• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The purpose of the study is to examine how electoral behavior is affected during elections based on one of the long term factors of voting: focusing on the voters party identification. In this case, it contributes to the study of turnout decline and re

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Research proposal for British Politics: Party Identification. Introduction The purpose of the study is to examine how electoral behavior is affected during elections based on one of the long term factors of voting: focusing on the voter's party identification. In this case, it contributes to the study of turnout decline and relating it to the general decline in party loyalty recently. I would like to test how likely a voter or an individual tends to support a specific political party during electoral periods in addition to long term effects. I find this aspect of the study interesting as it gives an insight to how people in different environments are brought up to 'support' a certain party. According to Jones and Kavanagh, 'strong supporters are likely to vote for the party in spite of misgivings about particular policies or leaders. But the proportion has fallen from over 40 percent in 1964 to 12 percent in 2001' (2003 p.85) and this can reflect what the electoral activity is like currently to us. ...read more.

Middle

Data will hopefully be able to help us in understanding and perceiving the steadiness of a political support among voters along with information on how long they tend to keep up with the support. Methodology: As for a methodology, I believe in order to get clear reliable statistical results, the most suitable and appropriate way to measure one's party identification is during the period of national elections through surveys that could be done with the cooperation of the BES. Surveys will be done through asking brief questions in three different phases- one that is three months before the elections to see if there was a specific preference; two, during the elections to also grasp the idea of non-identifiers, three, after three months of the election results to study any changes in opinions. Asking participants will have to be through email, telephone and/or by person. Anyone who is registered to vote would be contacted in order to get the maximum number of participation and a reliable valid result for the data that will be collected. ...read more.

Conclusion

How much are you likely to go and vote during the next election period? (0-not at all, 5-very strong) 0 1 2 3 4 5 2. Will you vote for the same party as you did last time? Yes/No/I do not know) 3. Do you have occasional doubts about the party that you support? (Yes/No) In order to calculate the data, we have to use a sophisticated statistical formula. Instruments that are recommended for usage: would have to be a i.e IBM's SPSS product software with the help and guidance of the BES for guidance thus a computer is a necessity and so is a telephone. In conclusion, due to the fact that elections occur in specific period of times, it needs thorough research. I estimate for the survey to take around 6-8 months to be completed and hopefully with previous studies, the questions and answers could be looked into and also be studied in order to provide additional data that could be very useful. Party identification should always be an important dynamic in electoral behavior as it has always been sociologically and psychologically present as it revolves around based on the environment people are place in. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our University Degree UK Government & Parliamentary Studies section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related University Degree UK Government & Parliamentary Studies essays

  1. Why did turnout decline substantially between the British general elections of 1997 and 2001, ...

    and this is confirmed by MORI who found that people were 9% likely in 2001 to think the result of the election was unimportant than in 1997 (MORI, 2010). If less people think that the result of the election is important then we would assume that voter turnout be lower.

  2. Britain and the Eurozone. Britains May 2005 parliamentary elections produced some very telling ...

    The level of integration between US and UK companies can be seen in both the financial services sector and oil companies. Britain's economy is heavily service laden much like the United States and this helps to promote transatlantic partnerships because of comparative advantages in these sectors.

  1. UK Voting Behaviour

    That was at the time when only a single polling organisation existed. Since the 1970s, the number of polls published in the media has increased sharply.

  2. British politics - analysing the reasons for low electoral participation.

    He goes on to discuss that it is difficult to explain how individuals conceptualise themselves. (Axford et al 2002, 77) The public s interests may not be the same as the power elite when they live in a different area, thus feel affected or unrepresented by the political parties with

  1. Voter Turnout in UK General Elections 1997 2005

    there are; 'two broad attitudes towards participation in contemporary democratic theory; the proponents of representative government ... and the champions of participatory democracy'. In a representative democracy, such as the UK, political participation can be achieved in a number of ways including protesting, campaigning or joining sectional or cause groups,

  2. What are the advantages and disadvantages of different electoral systems?

    In SV only two people are chosen, a first and second preference. If no one on first preference gets 50%+1 of the vote, then second preferences are factored in, and so on downwards until someone gets 50%+1.

  1. To what extent does social class continue to affect voting behaviour in Britain?

    It also indicates that the conservatives did not attract the votes needed from the two upper groups. In fact, the data shows that more workers from the salariat group preferred Labour over the Conservatives, even though Labours policies would

  2. Finance & Public Expenditure - A case study

    It was only in 1901 that Scotland experienced a better good deal when it comes to the allocation of funds. (McLean, 2003) The Impact of Devolution Over Scotland's Finances The problem with regard to the inequalities in the allocation of funds for England & Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland required

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work