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Women victim of globalization

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Introduction

Women victim of globalisation Over the past 200 years a large amount of different local economies around the world have opened up their foreign trade and investment. This complex process of globalisation affects various countries, regions and the people who live in these globalising places. To some, this is a positive move that will reduce poverty in developing countries. To others, it is a process with both 'winners' and 'losers' and they examined the divide between the 'haves' and the 'have-nots'.1 Even though the positive critics see a current wave of globalisation that promotes equality and reduces poverty, they have to admit that not everyone reaps the benefits of globalisation. ...read more.

Middle

This is even less than they were ten years ago.5 Although organisations like the United Nations and Amnesty International try to reduce women's poverty and bad place in society, policies are sometimes not changed enough or not at all. Shah even argues in her article about women rights that equality between men and women are not getting better and even get worse.6 The globalised world has made a change to more knowledge intensive production and has created new jobs. Nevertheless, women increasingly have to challenge with vulnerable forms of employment. The opening up of the market to foreign trade has meant a loss of the rights of the socialist state system. ...read more.

Conclusion

26-259 United Nations, 'Women at a Glance' (1997), at http://www.un.org/ecosocdev/geninfo/women/women96.htm, accessed 21 August 2010 United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Passific, 'Women and globalisation', at http://www.unescap.org/esid/GAD/Publication/women-globalization.pdf, accessed 21 August 2010 1 David Dollar and Aart Kraay, 'Spreading the wealth', Foreign Affairs (January/February 2002) 2 Anup Shah, 'Women's Rights' (2010), at http://www.globalissues.org/article/166/womens-rights, accessed 12 August 2010 3 United Nations, 'Women at a Glance' (1997), at http://www.un.org/ecosocdev/geninfo/women/women96.htm, accessed 21 August 2010 4 United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Passific, 'Women and globalisation', at http://www.unescap.org/esid/GAD/Publication/women-globalization.pdf, accessed 21 August 2010 5 Anne Summers, 'The end of equality: work, babies and women's choices in 21st century Australia', Random House, Milson's Point N.S.W., 2003, pp. 26-259 6 Anup Shah, 'Women's Rights' (2010), at http://www.globalissues.org/article/166/womens-rights, accessed 12 August 2010 ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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