• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11
  12. 12
    12
  13. 13
    13
  14. 14
    14
  15. 15
    15
  16. 16
    16
  17. 17
    17
  18. 18
    18
  19. 19
    19
  20. 20
    20
  21. 21
    21
  22. 22
    22
  23. 23
    23
  24. 24
    24
  25. 25
    25
  26. 26
    26

Counselling Case Study

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Counselling Case Study The following intervention analysis will utilise a planned verbal interaction, which occurred as part of ongoing care, during a 15-week placement on a Psychiatric Acute ward catering for Women aged 18-65. The client's informed consent was gained verbally, to use this conversation within my assignment. The client will be referred to as Carol. These measures are in accordance with the UKCC (1998) guidelines regarding consent and confidentiality. A client centred approach is to be employed as an aid to critical analysis of the intervention. It will firstly give a rationale for why this particular intervention was chosen and for the theoretical approach utilised. Biographical details of the client including events leading up to this point, previous conversations and incidents which are relevant to the chosen intervention, can be found in Appendix A. It will outline what a client centred approach involves. Firstly by defining its beliefs and essential core conditions, then by calling on the more practical micro-skills involved. The interaction will be analysed as each of these core conditions and skills are stated, thus helping in illustrating the helpful and not so helpful aspects of the interaction. Throughout the analysis, I will reflect upon how the intervention could have been more effective offering alternatives, which could have been more client-centred. Rationale The interaction, which is the focus of this study, is a prime example, in which I feel the need to offer a solution, in order to solve the problem, as I saw it. It was obvious to me that I did not have all the answers. This left me wondering whether a more 'realistic' approach would help. My practice up to this point has always been more directives and prescriptive, so logically I searched for an alternative, as my current practice was not having the desired effect. Therefore I chose to utilise a client centred approach and selected this particular intervention because I hoped firstly, to make sense of it and secondly, it could be inspiring to use a client led approach, as the prescriptive methods widely used in hospitals today (Morrison & Burnard 1990) ...read more.

Middle

Maybe it would have been more productive to focus on carols feelings, through reflection and recognition of her nonverbal cues. In 7, 11, and 17 I could have used this same technique to elicit further information. For example in 7 I should have said, "you said it was all right, you seem unsure" I would hope that she would respond to this by elaborating on what she means. This, as well as being reflective is also an empathy building statement. 3. Empathy building Burnard (1997) states that empathy building consists of making statements that show an understanding of the client's feelings. They should reflect what is implied as well as what is said overtly. Effectively this is an ability to read between the lines, allowing the client to disclose further as they see you understand them more. As seen above in 7 I could have been seen to be more empathic by noticing that although she implied it was okay, her non-verbal signals indicated otherwise. To notice this is a start but not enough, you need to state it within the conversation so that both parties are aware and the issue can be dealt with. To recognize this incongruence in a client can only help me, to recognize it in myself in the future. There was one point at which I attempted to be empathic. In 30 from her behavior I recognized her frustration with the situation, this seemed to appease Carol and consequently allowed us to continue. I feel that it would have been even more beneficial to have just said, "I sense your frustration, yet I'm confused at what it's with" again I see this statement as an aid to further exploration. Further illustration of my inability to build empathy is evident in 6 I lead the conversation to what I think is the root of the problem. If I am to be truly client centered here I would have to have faith in the fact that carol can lead herself to the root of her problem. ...read more.

Conclusion

I thought we were getting somewhere today. CLIENT: (Carol continues to walk to the door) (30) NURSE: You're obviously frustrated Carol, I can understand that, but walking away from it can't help, can it? CLIENT: (Carol says nothing but stops near the door and turns towards me) (31) NURSE: (There is a silence, which lasts for about 30 seconds) Please come back and at least set a time and date for the next meeting. CLIENT: (Carol returns to her original seat, she remains silent for about 30 seconds) Nothing is helping. (32) NURSE: (I remain silent, while maintaining good eye contact) the anxiety management pack I gave you, has it been useful or not? CLIENT: (She shakes her head) (33) NURSE: I get the feeling you don't think much to the pack? CLIENT: I don't understand it. It goes on about physical things. I don't want to know that I just want a list of thing's that will cure it (34) NURSE: Should we go through it together again, would that help? CLIENT: I don't know (She is dismissive in her tone of voice) (35) NURSE: Well, why don't you think about it and get back to me. I am more than happy to try alternatives. CLIENT: Yeah okay (36) NURSE: Do you have any ideas about what might help? CLIENT: Don't know (37) NURSE: There are other self-help packs around which you may find better, would you like me to get one of those for you? CLIENT: I don't really want to talk about it at the moment. (38) NURSE: Okay (I hold my hand up as to suggest that it is okay) shall we leave it there for now? CLIENT: Yeah (39) NURSE: Why don't you think about what we've talked about today, try to look at the positives, think about whether we should try a different approach and we can talk about it the next time we meet. CLIENT: There you go again talk, talk, talk, and talk. (Carol makes a gesture with her hand as if it were talking) (40) NURSE: I think maybe we should leave it there. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our University Degree Nursing section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related University Degree Nursing essays

  1. Nursing Case Study

    An idea shared by Schnyder et al (1999) who state this is a recognized reason for suicide. It was recognized since 1980 that she had suffered with varying degrees of depression. Possibly initiated by the death of her mother. In 1996 she deteriorated when having a hip replacement.

  2. This assignment looks at mental health and mental illness. It defines the differences ...

    Mrs White had been complaining of epigastic tightness from the previous morning, later that afternoon she and her husband noticed sudden pedal oedema. Mrs White normally lives independently with her husband and copes with everyday living as well as mobilising independently, but does have a medical history of type 2 diabetes, hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia.

  1. The aim of this essay is to critically evaluate the bio-psycho-social perspectives and influences ...

    The experience of loneliness is not just a social aspect it is correlated to physiological and psychological conditions that; included dietary inadequacies, overt alcohol consumption and depression (Pettigrew and Roberts, 2006). Since her husband had passed away Mrs Jones had not cooked much for herself she would share a small sandwich in the evening with Millie.

  2. A case study of a 68 year old patient admitted to undego a bowel ...

    It is now up to the nurse to reinforce the information he has learnt and help him to care for himself (Alexander et al, 2006). During the initial post operative period Mr Jones will be too unwell to care for the stoma and the responsibility will rest with the nurse (Borrett & McGrath, 2005).

  1. Law and Ethics in Nursing. The aim of this assignment is to reflect ...

    LoBiondo-Wood & Haber (1994) 'confirm that sample sizes in qualitative studies tend to be small, and suggest that interviewing should continue until 'data saturation' has occurred, that is, until no 'new' ideas or thoughts are identified by the respondents In this study, this occurred by the eighth interview, and the research continued until 12 interviews had been completed'.

  2. Gibb's Model of Communication - An Interaction

    By sitting squarely towards Mary, keeping my posture open, leaning in towards her, maintaining eye contact and having a relaxed posture, encouraged her to relax and feel less intimidated and therefore talk more openly about her concerns. Although clearly upset by her experience she soon opened up and the verbal communication was made easier.

  1. Research Awareness. As a student nurse, my research will be searching for articles ...

    The articles I have chosen are articles 1, 2 and 8, they are all very interesting and have a lot of information, and however it is information which will lead me to do further research, as it is very interesting.

  2. Reflective writing, I have decided to reflect upon the development of my confidence and ...

    I found it frustrating that I was spending more time trying to remember the phases of the assessment than actually performing it. Also, when it came to using the bird, the presence of a mask and high-flow oxygen was distressing to Mr A and at the same time made me

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work