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Elderly people in Residential Care.

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Introduction

Elderly people in Residential Care The New Labour Government is committed to raising the care service standard for elderly and children. On taking office in 1997, the government acknowledged there are many problems and failures in the care service left by the Tory legacy. Labour decided to modernise the service to counter the problems and crisis faced in the care service. Policy consultants of the Better Service Task Force are reviewing a wide-ranging of current welfare provisions in the UK. This report aims persuade the government as part of the modernisation programme there is a need to bring a change in the Residential Care for elderly as there has been a growing concern at the poor level of service provided in institutional homes. Care homes should provide a quality of service meeting the needs of the residents as in a normal setting. However, the institutionalised nature of the care has many negative impacts on the residents' as they perceive it is as negative form of care and a service denying independence, autonomy, privacy, power and other principle of human rights. Elderly are abused and neglected in some care homes while large proportion of staff caring for them are untrained and incompetent in caring. Funding for elderly care is major issue, on one extreme elderly are being forced to pay for care and on the other local authorities struggle to manage service within their budget. This report addresses theses issues as key concerns in the service, then suggests a particular change to make in the service and the last section provides a synopsis of the ways in which users can be involved in service delivery and planning. A brief resume of current provision Residential care is highly an important source of accommodation for old people, who even with domiciliary support cannot manage to live in their own homes, but who still do need intensive nursing care. ...read more.

Middle

Although local discretion allow flexibility, it means that there is inconsistency between authorities, leaving providers uncertain about what they need to be registered, and leaving service users unclear about what standards they can expect as a national minimum standards. The current government has introduced the Care Standard Act in 2000 set promising regulation to enhance standard but however, like any other legislation and policy initiatives for improving care service the public will be sceptical as whether it be implemented effectively (www.doh.gov.uk >2003) A case for change The current government is trying to improve the quality and has introduced a number of policy and initiatives to regulate standard and monitor consistency and coherence. The long term care charter 'Better Care, Higher Standards' 1999 and the Care Standard Act 2000 was brought to improve the quality and efficiency of the service. The remit of this report is to suggest a particular case for change, however, as the last section have shown there are numerous number of problems and concerns in the service thus it is difficult to pick out one particular aspect of the service as many concerns and causes of the problems are interlinked such as insufficient resources, inadequate care, lack of accommodation, untrained staff are indictment of lack of funding. Abuse and neglect could occur by untrained staff or staff shortage if there is more demand than workers can cope with. The concerns with regard to principles of human rights such as autonomy and independence are to do with a lack of user empowerment. There are a number policies and programmes from the past the and present government to improve care service tough Labour is doing more than the Tories but problems and crisis still persist. It is not lack of legislation, regulation, supporting bodies or providers of service, it is the issue of funding that needs to be addressed and challenged. Despite the Labour government's attempt to modernise social services and giving extra �3b for SSD up to 2002 an annual increase of ...read more.

Conclusion

Care management process should adopt person-centred planning involving the users assessments of needs. The tendency of planning care around a perceived 'quota requirements' cannot effectively meet the needs of all residents, some may require specific responses not just a standard allocation of beds, served food and so on. Going back a case in section 2 of an elderly being forced feed despite the woman's inability to move her neck. Issues like these cannot be ignored under any circumstances. Conclusion This report has highlighted residential care is perceived negatively by the users due to the institutional nature of the service. However, it is important to note that this form of provision is very important for those who do not have alternative accommodations. The impacts of institutionalised nature of provision are not often addressed in service planning and delivery otherwise residents would not be so reluctant to go into residential care. Care staff, play a vital role in the life of residents and it is equally important for them to be trained and qualified to meet the needs of the residents. The Modernisation programme and the Care Standard Act 2000 should bring some improvements to the care but however, to improve the quality of life of elderly living in residential care more funding is needed. More money into residential care service would solve many of its problems and enhance the life residents such having facilities and clubs for leisure activities, promoting independence and normality. The quality of homes is also determined by how much the LA can afford to pay to private and independent sectors. Involving users in planning and delivery is equally important as the service itself. Elderly people in residential homes want to be heard and seen. Person-centred planning and self- assessment of elderly must be at the centre stage of care planning and delivery in order to meet individual needs. Consultation with users and voluntary agencies working to represent old people is a must in planning care at all levels. 1 1 ...read more.

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The writer is right to state that clients should be involved in their own care planning, but it would be useful for the writer to explain why. What are the benefits to the clients as well as the Home? While funding of residential care is definitely an issue, there should be some acknowledgement that money is not as

Marked by teacher Diane Apeah-Kubi 05/09/2013

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