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University Degree: Healthcare

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  • Marked by Teachers essays 22
  1. A Comparative Analysis of the UK and US Healthcare Systems

    This reflects the ideological underpinnings of the UK system in the Beveridge model. The National Health Service Act, passed in 1948, stipulated accordingly that access to healthcare be available to all regardless of wealth. These inherent structural differences manifest themselves in several other features of the two healthcare systems. This essay will analyse these differences by exploring the cost, quality, efficiency, and equity of the two healthcare systems, in order to evaluate their relative merits. Cost The greatest contrast between the two healthcare systems is their respective cost structures. In order to compare these structures, it is first necessary to outline the components of total healthcare expenditure.

    • Word count: 2183
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"From caring comes courage."

-Lao Tzu

If you're a warm, practical person who has always been interested in protecting the most vulnerable, then a university degree in health care could be a good next step for you. There are a number of specialties to choose from, including cardiac physiology and audiology, or you can opt for a more general degree like Health and Social Care. Health care degrees are vocational in nature, so many will include hands-on experience within the three year structure.

Students of health care should be prepared to write eloquently on a range of issues within health policy and social care, especially for the more theoretically inclined degrees. If you need help with the written portion of your coursework, visit Marked by Teachers' collection of student-submitted essays on subjects allied to medicine. Study the teacher-marked examples, and before you know it, you'll be able to re-shape your own work into something excellent.

Due to the vocational nature of the degree, most graduates from will seek out care jobs, although some may go on to use their skills for roles withinresearch, consulting, teaching and management.

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Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • Identify the kinds of information that a frontline manager needs to carry out their role. Discuss some of the issues that they will need to handle to be effective when managing information

    "Conclusion It is clear from working on this assignment and within health and social care that a great deal of a manager's time is taken up with dealing with information. In the course reader (Mintzburg, (2003), p.291) Mintzburg identifies, during a study on this subject, that a chief executive could spend 40% of their time on duties associated with the transmission of information, I feel that this percentage could actually be higher for frontline managers. It is also clear that soft, informal information can be just as important as hard, more formal information and that both are needed to do the job of managing successfully. However, all information can become muddled, can be mismanaged and can be abused. A great deal of power comes with the holding of information and a manager needs to have good ethics in order to deal with information in the correct way. All health and social care workers, at every level also need these good ethics as information can be abused by anyone, not just managers. Health and social care still needs to move forward with regard to information technology and the use of databases but still needs to be mindful of the fact that we work with people rather than machines. We also need to be more forthcoming with regards to training in these areas."

  • Identify a health issue related to module content and discuss its impact on an individual/group from biological, social and psychological perspective. Discuss strategies to overcome the problem.

    "In conclusion it can be seen that alcohol produces a range of biological, psychological and social effects in adolescents. These effects combined with an individual's underlying personality and immediate environment can result in antisocial behaviour. There is clearly a need for more research on the effectiveness of prevention programmes if a national strategy is to be developed. The research into the effectiveness of brief interventions is encouraging and therefore Health Care Professionals should give out appropriate advice to at risk patients whenever possible."

  • Review and discussion of 1993 meeting between the United States President Bill Clinton and Italian Prime Minister Carlo Ciampi to discuss US-Italian cooperation on a variety of domestic and international affairs.

    "In conclusion, the Italian and American Constitutions created provisions limiting authoritative and centralized rule but, also, hindering massive national welfare programs like health care. The nature of limited government makes implementing large welfare overhauls difficult because representative governments open the doors to a variety of different interest groups. Furthermore, the legislative process in such governments creates systems prone to inefficient compromises. Large welfare programs such as national health care are marked by their need to be well organized and planned out, and such compromises too often impede such meticulous arrangements. Other political institutions further cramp the legislative process, like the party systems, lobbying, and regionalism. Simply stated, the nature of health care butts heads with the nature of weak, decentralized governments found in Italy and the United States. Despite their countless historical and cultural differences, Italy and America fall victim to a common enemy when it comes to significant health care reform: themselves. Without changing their institutions that impede comprehensive national welfare program legislation and implementation, meaningful advances to both their health care systems is doomed."

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