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Mental Health and Helping Skills.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

BSc (Hons) Community Health Care NURSING (Health Visiting) Mental Health and Helping Skills Claire Margaret Ramsden Submission Date - 6th June 2002 Word Count - 2,989 Contents Page 1. Introduction ...................................................... 1 2. The development of a helping relationship .......... 2 2.1 The Ante-Natal Visit ............................................... 2 2.2 The Birth Visit ........................................................ 4 2.3 The Second Post-Natal Home Visit ........................... 5 2.4 The Third Post-Natal Home Visit .............................. 6 2.5 Developing the Care Plan ........................................ 8 2.6 The First Listening Visit .......................................... 10 2.7 Continuing Care ..................................................... 11 3. Conclusion ......................................................... 13 4. Appendices Appendix 1 - The EPDS explained ............................ 15 Appendix 2 - Edinburgh Post-natal Depression Scale (EPDS) 16 Appendix 3 - EPDS - Scoring ................................... 17 Appendix 4 - The Stages of Change Model .................. 19 Appendix 5 - EPDS - 19/02/2002 ............................. 20 Appendix 6 - EPDS - 25/02/2002 ............................. 21 Appendix 7 - Post-natal series of events ..................... 22 5. References ......................................................... 23 6. Bibliography ....................................................... 29 1. Introduction "Mental health: is the emotional and spiritual resilience that enables us to enjoy life and survive pain, suffering and disappointment. It is a positive sense of well-being and an underlying belief in our own worth and the worth of others". Holland (2000) This assignment identifies a client I have been visiting as part of the BSc (Hons) Community Health Care Nursing - Health Visiting, within a large inner city area. The assignment describes how the client's mental health needs were assessed and a negotiated plan of care was offered to support the client. An outline of the Health Visiting role is addressed along with the role of others involved in the care. A critical reflection of the experience is addressed with its implications on the role of the specialist practitioner within the wider picture of mental health practice in primary health care. The assignment is a reflective incident, it is therefore written in the first person singular. ...read more.

Middle

2.6 The First Listening Visit The first organised listening visit aimed to reduce Joanne's feelings of low self-esteem and inability to cope with her present situation. The visit was structured and time managed allowing Joanne to talk at length. Joanne explained that she had seen a female G.P. and the appointment had been useful. Joanne had been prescribed a month's course of anti-depressants, and felt that these were beginning to take effect. Within the visit, feelings were discussed. She expressed feelings of joy at the birth of Kelsie and was able to discuss her home life and relationships in more detail. The visit concluded by discussing Joanne's progress, she felt that significant progress would be achieved with the help of the listening visits and the anti-depressants. This visit proved to be successful, with the unexpected outcome of Joanne wishing to take Oliver to a playgroup. I gave Joanne a list of playgroups in the area and agreed that this would be beneficial for herself and Oliver. During this visit, Joanne was able to express her feelings in more detail, I felt that Joanne was prepared to take further action; this indicated that she had moved to the preparation stage of the model (Prochaska and Diclemente, 1982). The visit concluded by Joanne repeating the EPDS. Her score was 14 out of a possible 30 (See Appendix 6). I was pleased that, Joanne had moved forward in a positive direction and, thought that I had played a small part in her progress. Unfortunately, until this visit it had not become clear to Joanne that there was an identified health need and a reason to change. Joanne described her mood as very low, recognised that she was obsessed by housework, and expressed concerns of not being a 'good mother'. On reflection, this visit provided a structured framework for future visits helping Joanne build up her confidence and resolve issues linked with low self-esteem and disempowerment. ...read more.

Conclusion

Hardly at all ? 3. I have blamed myself unnecessarily when things went wrong: Yes, most of the time ? Yes, some of the time ? Not very often ? No, never ? 4. I have felt worried and anxious for no very good reason: No, not at all ? Hardly ever ? Yes, sometimes ? Yes, very often ? 5. I have felt scared or panicky for no very good reason: Yes, quite a lot ? Yes, sometimes ? No, not much ? No, not at all ? 6. Things have been getting on top of me: Yes, most of the time I haven't been able to cope at all ? Yes, sometimes I haven't been coping as well as usual ? No, most of the time I have coped quite well ? No, I have been coping as well as ever ? 7. I have been so unhappy that I have difficulty sleeping: Yes, most of the time ? Yes, sometime ? Not very often ? No, not at all ? 8. I have felt sad or miserable: Yes, most of the time ? Yes, quite often ? Not very often ? No, not at all ? 9. I have been so unhappy that I have been crying: Yes, most of the time ? Yes, quite often ? Only occasionally ? No, never ? 10. The thought of harming myself has occurred to me: Yes, quite often ? Sometimes ? Hardly ever ? Never ? Appendix 7. Post-Natal Series of Events Joanne described the following in detail explaining that these were negative thoughts - 1. Labour experience - No pain relief and experience too quick - Gavin was not at the birth as he was working and did not get to the hospital in time. 2. Oliver had to be left with a friend as the labour began quickly. 3. Gavin did not appear interested in the new baby. 4. Gavin did not appear to want to share in the day-to-day housework. 5. Joanne had not breastfeed Oliver and breastfeeding Kelsie was much more difficult, than Joanne had expected. 5. ...read more.

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