• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Pacncreatitis Case Study. This paper summarizes the publishings of Doenges, Moorhouse, and Murr (2010) and Christenson and Kockrow (2011) which describes the disease process pancreatitis. Christenson et al. (2011) discusses common signs and sympt

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Pancreatitis PFC Bell ABSTRACT This paper summarizes the publishing's of Doenges, Moorhouse, and Murr (2010) and Christenson and Kockrow (2011) which describes the disease process pancreatitis. Christenson et al. (2011) discusses common signs and symptoms patients experience with pancreas disorders. Doenges et al. (2010) discusses the most common diagnostic techniques and the most popular medical and nursing management procedures that are practiced today. Christenson et al. (2010) defines the abbreviation AST as Aspartate aminotransferase and ALT as alanine aminotransferase. Both of these publishing's have the same definitions of pancreatitis and both suggest that lifestyle changes, medications, and surgical intervention may be necessary to decrease the chance of more acute episodes. On Wednesday September 28 CS 51-year-old man, with recent laparoscopic cholecystectomy, presented to the emergency department with complaints of severe abdominal pain. The episode started around 1100 and was initially mild. He was able to eat normally, but around 1400, the pain became much worse to the point that he had difficulty breathing. He took an oxycodone, which provided little relief. CS found that flexing his hips and staying still helped relieve the pain. He described the pain as cramping and wrapping around to his back, worse on the right side. ...read more.

Middle

In chronic pancreatitis with loss of pancreatic functions, Doenges et al. (2010) stated that replacement enzymes, such as pancreatin (Dizymes) and pancrelipase (Protilase and Cotazym) can be prescribed to correct shortages to promote digestion and absorption of nutrients. On Wednesday September 28 CS, 51-year-old man, with recent laparoscopic cholecystectomy, presented to the emergency department with complaints of severe abdominal pain. The episode started around 1100 and was initially mild. He was able to eat normally, but around 1400, the pain became much worse to the point that he had difficulty breathing. He took an oxycodone without relief. Flexing his hips and staying still helped relieve the pain. He describes the pain as cramping and wrapping around to his back, worse on the right side. He has associated nausea, but no emesis. In the ER he was given diluadid, which broke the pain and now feels like his normal self. He has had 4-5 episodes like this since June and has not seen improvement since the cholecystectomy. In CSs' case he is believed to have chronic pancreatitis. CS described his severe pain as a cramping and twisting sensation, which radiates to the right side of his back. ...read more.

Conclusion

Meals given too early may worsen symptoms. Risk for unstable blood glucose level related to pancreatic impairment. Patient will maintain glucose in normal range of 80-100 until discharge. Assess for signs of increased thirst and urination or changes in mental status and sight. This may indicate the developing of hyperglycemia. Perform and monitor results of bedside fingerstick glucose testing and dipstick testing of urine for sugar. Early detection of inadequate glucose utilization makes it easier to manage. Monitor serum glucose levels closely, as this can indicate the need for insulin because hyperglycemia is frequently present. Discharge planning begins the moment the patient arrives on the floor. Patients' pain should be relieved or controlled at a reasonable level such as a 3/10 on the pain scale. They should be stable, meaning they are within normal limits concerning vital signs. The patient should understand the disease process of pancreatitis, potential complications, and therapeutic regimen understood. The patient was not discharged home with any new medications. Patient should also understand that alcohol can increase chances of re-occurrence. A referral to a support group may be needed. The patient should let his wife know that she will need to be there to take him home when he is discharged. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our University Degree Nursing section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related University Degree Nursing essays

  1. Nursing Case Study

    Table 1. Common signs of acute anxiety � Feelings of fear or dread � Trembling, restlessness, and muscle tension � Rapid heart rate � Light-headedness or dizziness � Perspiration � Cold hands/feet � Shortness of breath As mentioned earlier carols primary source of socialisation when at home comes from spending time with her daughter.

  2. Observation and reflection. Measuring vital signs - Temperature, Pulse, Respiration and Blood Pressure.

    The beep sound is an indication that temperature would have been recorded. Normal body temperature should range between 36.5 & 37.7 Degrees Celsius (Weber and Kelly, 2003). After the temperature l had to measure pulse. For adults the radial pulse is the site for assessment while for infants & young

  1. A case study of a 68 year old patient admitted to undego a bowel ...

    Patient Assessment & Pre-operative Care The assessment of Mr Jones is required to identify any special needs, highlight potential problems and provide a baseline against which post-operative measurements can be made (Alexander et al, 2006). This is usually done using a nursing model such as Roper, Logan and Tierney's activities of daily living (Holland et al, 2003).

  2. HOSPITAL CASE ANALYSIS. This case study takes place at a hospital and is based ...

    Floor A Get rid of Smith * N- lose an experienced worker * N- employer disrespect for new head * N- possibility of losing older experienced nurses Empowerment * P- builds confidence * P- motivation (because this gives subordinates more say)

  1. The Endocrine System

    Pituitary Located in a bony cavity just below the base of the brain is one of the endocrine systems most important parts - the pituitary gland. This is often described as the body's master gland, and it secretes several hormones that regulate the function of the other endocrine glands.

  2. Free essay

    Patent-care study. Kirsty is a seventeen-year-old young lady who was diagnosed with Crohns Disease ...

    and the ward is split to accommodate the primary nursing framework: the double side room, the bottom side room and the Day Room is one allocation, the top side room and the male bay is another and the last one is the female bay.

  1. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

    Chronic can be defined as, pertaining to a health-related condition, disease, state, disorder, or set of symptoms that lasts and/ or frequently reoccurs over a long period of time (Petty, 1999). The U.S. National Centre for Health Statistics (http://www.medfriendly.com) defines a chronic condition as one that has lasted for three months or more.

  2. Case Study. This essay will examine the nursing process involved in managing chronic venous ...

    17, No. 2, pp. 147? 152. Available at: http://gcal.summon.serialssolutions.com/search?s.q=Venous+ulcers%3A+A+reappraisal+analyzing+the+effects+of+neuropathy%2C+muscle+involvement%2C+and+range+of+motion+upon+gait+and+calf+muscle+function [Accessed 22nd November 2012]. Bland, J.M., Cullum, N., Franks, P.J., Mole, T., O'Meara, S., Scriven, M. et al. 2009, ?Four layer bandage compared with short stretch bandage for venous leg ulcers: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials with data from individual patients?, BMJ: British Medical Journal (Overseas & Retired Doctors Edition)

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work