Self, Body and Portrait

Self, Body and Portraiture Portraiture has always been a central point of visual art. As a western society do not let the idea of body slip from our mind, in fact it is perfectly plausible to say a human being, typically, by modern day nature will think of self from minute one to the last minute. We do not ignore ourselves. As a species we are self involved, fair to say vain, and conscious of body. Whether we are concerned with our own bodies, wrinkles, fat, size, shapes, marks, etc, you name it; we have it and are perfectly aware. We compare, we copy, we despise, we laugh, we cry, and all because of body. It is most certainly the biggest obsession in the world today. This obsession will continue, and take over lives and minds as it is already doing. One of the most fascinating art forms is, and always will be - portraiture, family, fame, regal, poor or rich. An artist's most mysterious ideas come from within portraiture. A passage written by John Berger, in his book "Ways of Seeing" states, "in portraiture an artist can put across personality traits and characterisations. The penetrating characterisations seduce us into believing that we know the personality traits." John Berger The body has always been an important aspect of portraiture. In the past the gestures and disposition of the body vary in many different ways. The face is seen to be a marker of identity and as

  • Word count: 4086
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: Art & Design
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Art as Commodities

Art as Commodities Trading in art is similar in some ways to dealing in other commodities; one is subject to the market pressures of supply and demand. Although art prices often vary more then commodities according to arbitrary, factors such as aesthetics, authenticity, condition, rarity and provenance.1 Yet even with such variances in value the popularity of art as a commodity remains. In all realms whether it is the artists, the dealers, the auction house or the collector's the art market is clearly flourishing. From 1987 through 1991, Japanese buyers alone spent more than $8.7 billion on art, and these are only the official trade figures.2 Nevertheless even with such vast amounts being spent on art there remains an uneasy relationship between art and money. The controversy laying in the question of what makes one piece more valuable than another and who decides such a value. This insistent need to reconcile both art and money is made apparent by Paul Alexander in his article Murky Image: The Question of Warhol's

  • Word count: 4042
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: Art & Design
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An early pop artist was Andy Warhol, who is known for his drawing of a can of soup.

"Pop art" is a term used to describe popular art, the word popular meaning everyday life. Pop art also varied greatly, from soup cans to comic book art to abstract art. Pop artistis often have "satirical or playful intents." This would mean that a pop artist tries to express himself through humorous art. An early pop artist was Andy Warhol, who is known for his drawing of a can of soup.He was American and was born in 1928. He died in 1987. His works can be found at the Whitney museum of American Art and at the Museum of Modern Art. Another American pop artist was Roy Lichenstein. He was born in 1923 and is still living. His work can also be found at the Whitney Museum of modern art and the Museum of Modern Art. Another pop artist was James Rosenquist. He, too, was American. He was born in 1933 and has yet to die. His works may be foundat the Museum of Modern Art and at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Yet another American pop artist was Larry Rivers. He was born in 1923 and still lives. His work may be found at the Metropolitian Museum of Art. Robert Rauschienburg was also an American pop artist. He was born in 1925, and, like most of the other artists in this essay, still ives. His work may be found at the Whitney Museum of Art and at the Modern Museum of Art. I chose to describe As I Opened Fire, by Roy Lichenstein. It was made in 964 and is the the third

  • Word count: 4038
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: Art & Design
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Design a poster to promote transport

Introduction Posters in the 1920s signalled a new age of travel and leisure. With motor cars, aeroplanes and boats coming to be used by the people posters were required to advertise the fact that your travels can be made shorter and more enjoyable. It also showed through its messages that distant destinations were also potentially accessible. Poster designers like Adolphe Mouron Cassandre, E. McKnight Kauffer, Edward Wandsworth and F. C. Herrick were among the first to create such posters thriving on the spirit of travel. Each one of them developed a personal response to their own distinctive style. The graphics needed to support holiday programmes, travel documentaries and any of those related to the organisation of the finer points needed to assist the actual journey might be used for designing. The design of brochures, tickets, aircraft livery etc. can all be related to this theme In the following project I will use my ability of graphics in relation to the theme of 'Journeys' and try to develop a personal response to the designer's styles. I will firstly show my understanding about the 1920s art movement, study each artist and their styles and make comparisons. I will also create a poster for my time advertising the fastest train in the world - The Bullet Train. The Constructivist Movement The above model displays the ideals of abstraction, functionalism and

  • Word count: 3942
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: Art & Design
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How far do you think that the Kleophrades Painter's use of red figure gave him an advantage over the Amasis Painter who worked in black figure?

James Morris-Cotterill Classics Coursework Mr. Brinded How far do you think that the Kleophrades Painter's use of red figure gave him an advantage over the Amasis Painter who worked in black figure? The full black figure style emerged by the mid-7th century and the red figure technique emerged around 530 BC. The Amasis Painter worked in the black figure style, using a red background and black figures, and the Kleophrades Painter in the red style, using a black background and red figures. The differences in techniques afforded differences in quality between the two painters. It is true to say that the Kleophrades Painter's works are superior to that of the Amasis Painter's, however, whilst the advantage granted through the use of the red figure technique is evident, it is not the only reason for the Kleophrades Painter's superiority. The black figure technique, as noted above, used a red background and black figures. Details were cut (incised) into the black slip, and the vase was then fired. The Amasis painter mainly portrayed real life on vases, as opposed to mythological scenes, which are often undramatic and difficult to interpret, due to the lack of written inscriptions. His works show a trend towards a central figure/ object around which the scene is organised. There is little or no physical contact between the figures and little overlapping. Gesture is the

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  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: Art & Design
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FantasyArt.

Fantasy Art "The fantasy illustrator takes the pictorial conventions of realistic portrayal and then manipulates and inverts them to create marvellous worlds for which there can be no earthly analogy" 1 Introduction Fantasy art has been a part of all human society throughout history. It is found in 'abnormal' forms, folklore, mythology, fairytales, religion and science fiction. Fantasy art is a genre that has evolved through the past centuries. Many could say the start could be found in surrealism, however mythological stories are based in fantasy, as it helps you tap into your unconscious mind and explore meanings to things you could never imagine. This essay will help us understand what leads us to present fantasy art factors such as films, media ... etc. may have effected this. Fantasy has always existed in people's thoughts throughout time. All ideas and stories of fantasy have been developed and shown through art and fantasy literature both have always been and still are very strongly linked. With recent hits of 'new age' themes and a high interest in fantasy. Fantasy art is now one of the most profitable areas in art. Fantasy artists, great modern artists enjoy the great fame inside their field, yet they are often unknown and unnoticed outside it. Fantasy art looks really easy and fun but it is one of the most challenging genres to depict successfully. To create a

  • Word count: 3647
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: Art & Design
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Line " the essence of art, the language of free expression.

"Line - the essence of art, the language of free expression." - Foundations of Art & Design, Lois Fichner-Rathus, 2008, Thomas Wadsworth, Belmont, CA Line is one of the basic elements in art as it is one-dimensional and can differ in terms of width, length and direction. It is used in various ways; straight or curved, thick or thin, horizontal, vertical or diagonal therefore can be used to create form. Line can be used to help the eye to see around the compositions and somewhat convey a story or message. Line is used everywhere in our lives. We can see it in everything from dirt to the sky. This essay will study the use of Line in Expressive Art because it is believed that line is one of the best elements used by any artist to express their feelings, emotions onto an artwork. It will study the different art movements that elaborate expressiveness through various techniques and media. In art, expression and line are fundamentally linked. With no expression, the Line we draw would mean nothing as Line are created through the connection of points and are defined as the side-by-side placement of an infinite number of points. In other words, line is infinite; line has no endpoint, and is ever going. The length of the line may become longer if the point moves on. However, a line has no measureable size because they have no width. Therefore, for Line to perceive in the world of

  • Word count: 3626
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: Art & Design
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Abstract Fantasies.

As this is a 'personal study' I thought to begin I would give a quick insight into the reasoning behind me studying the two different art forms, as an artists I obviously have some passion for the Arts and find fascinating the variety and skill of art in the world, from pop artists such as Andy Warhol to the great surrealist Salvador Dali, (a personal idol of mine). I love exploring the art forms and trying as many mediums and techniques as available, if time would permit I would love to compare and contrast a endless array of great artists, like the mind boggling and revolutionary cubist work of Piccasso showing multiple emotions and sides of a person in one piece , the bold and beautiful modern art of Lichenstein showing the world in his own unmistakeable way, the awe inspriring work of Cezanne and countless other artists who have made this area of our culture a fascination of mine and undoubtedly masses of people throughout the world in all times. But as time isn't infinite and the list of amazing artists could take me to a ripe old age I have concentrated on two artists, neither the Monet's or Da Vinchi's of the art world, but who's work has caught my imagination and gave me a urge to learn there ways and the way of their work. The first artist I am studying, as mentioned in my introduction, is my uncle Kevin Phillips a Durham born artist who produces abstract pieces

  • Word count: 3615
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: Art & Design
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Discuss the extent to which the international art market is a regulator in the post academy art world. To what extent does the market limit the supply of art and antiques and separate good art from junk art?

Marta Queiroga de Sousa Cabral MA Museum & Gallery Management; 2002, full-time Art Markets Module Professor Dr. Iain Robertson 5th June 2003 Discuss the extent to which the international art market is a regulator in the post academy art world. To what extent does the market limit the supply of art and antiques and separate good art from junk art? CONTENTS Introduction 3 Analysis of the art market 5 Conclusion 13 Bibliography 15 INTRODUCTION The present assignment has the purpose of showing elements, which can contribute, in a general view, to the development of the art market and also falling on responsibilities with all those participants of the art market. It will be the result of critical reflection that it will turn into a training moment. The main aims of this review are to acquire an understanding of the conditions of the art market and to develop a critical knowledge of the commercial art world and the relevant international market. The idea that the international art market is a regulator in the post academy art world has implications on the formation of prices and values in the art market, due to the macroeconomic reality, political and cultural changes of this period.

  • Word count: 3603
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: Art & Design
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Is Graffiti Art?

Is Graffiti Art? Graffiti has loomed between the borders of true art, mindless trash and a way of solely getting your name around, and more people seeing it. Is Graffiti the everyday scrawlings of misdirected teenagers or the well-laced masterpiece by a keen eye? For years the opinions have changed and shifted. Currently there is not a consensus about whether graffiti can yet be classed as art. Art to some people would be the great works of Michelangelo, Da Vinci, Bottachelli, Matisse, Van Gough, and Monet but in today's world anything can be classed as 'art'. Different forms and styles have arisen and most people have an opinion on what is art. A splatter of paint on canvas; art? Brush strokes on a page; art? A collage out of rubbish; art? Who decides what is art and what is not? How can someone say "that is not art" when the creator believes it to be exquisite? Why do some people perceive graffiti as nothing but paint on a wall and not the true masterpiece that others believe it really is. The many forms and styles of graffiti make it hard to distinguish the meaningless strokes from those that are clearly art if you choose to see them. Can some writers go over the top and do too much? Or not do enough for it to be classed as art? To understand this we have to look back at the history of graffiti. Graffiti originated with the Romans when they started to write on the

  • Word count: 3497
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: Art & Design
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