• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

AS and A Level: Language: Context, Genre & Frameworks

Browse by

Currently browsing by:

Meet our team of inspirational teachers

find out about the team

Get help from 80+ teachers and hundreds of thousands of student written documents

  • Marked by Teachers essays 32
  • Peer Reviewed essays 6
  1. Marked by a teacher

    Class and Gender conflict in Pygmalion

    4 star(s)

    Henry Higgins represents the upper class of society, those that are expected to be both educated and wealthy. He is profoundly aware of his status and is not particularly sympathetic towards those of the lower class. This is revealed as he is first introduced to Liza and refers to her as a 'squashed cabbage leaf.' (Shaw, 2003:18) This first scene is important as it establishes the class differences that are evident within the language contrasts of each of the characters. Higgins plays an important role in establishing this theme as he places great emphasis on phonetics. He has the ability to place an individual within the geographical location of their place of origin.

    • Word count: 1519
  2. Marked by a teacher

    Representation is governed by perspective. For this reason composers will attempt to manipulate their construction of events and characters, to bring to the fore of public discussion, their own esteemed perspective. This becomes evident in texts of, T

    4 star(s)

    The powerful and emotive tone used by Robertson to convey Michael X, coupled with the historical dialogue from the trial, humanizes and elevates the convicted criminal thus the audience is positioned to have an empathetic reaction to the Character as Robertson presents Michael, as a paradigm for all individuals on death row, positioning him as a hero, "token black." Thus he convinces his audiences to see the need to abolish the death penalty, for such a "changed man." Robertson acknowledges the opposing perspective giving credence to his own argument.

    • Word count: 1336
  3. Marked by a teacher

    Summary of "Critical period effects in second language learning - The influence of maturational state on the acquisition of English as a second language", by Jacqueline S. Johnson and Elissa L. Newport,

    4 star(s)

    The hypotheses tested mainly focused on the effects of age on second language attainment. Two studies were done on immigrants who were abiding in the U.S. for approximately five years. According to the interviews conducted by Patkowski in 1980 and the language facts studied by Oyama in 1978, results inferred that the earlier the subjects arrived, the more knowledgeable and well rounded they were on the use of English. The topics pertaining to this research are as follows and are further discussed in the methods section: "1.

    • Word count: 1217

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • "All human thoughts come into existence by grasping the meaning and mastering the use language" Polanyi - Do you agree? Discuss what the author means in the quotation and from a language perspective discern how it relates to knowledge.

    "Now at the end of the day, I can come to the conclusion, that everybody has his or her own definition of thought, meaning and mastering the use of language, and this might affects whether one agrees with Polanyi or not. I myself do not think that human thoughts only come into existence when grasping the meaning and mastering the use of language. I just have many thoughts, which are kept in my head, without using the language I would define as something used to communicate with others. As I am a human, and I constantly think, I believe that I do have human thoughts, and I know that some of them do come into existence, but they often stay in my head the way they are. Without being transformed into "real" language so others can understand me."

  • "If thought corrupt language, language can corrupt thought" Discuss

    "In conclusion to ascertain as to if thought corrupts language, language can also corrupt thought, I totally agree. But I don't take the statement as serious as George Orwell does. He gives many examples of bad writing in the essay Politics and the English language, but I think I speak for everyone that one of those examples we use in our language every day. Does this make us bad writers? According to Orwell we are. I know it's just his opinion but he defiantly takes extremes and basically says that all essays, novels, political speeches that don't look like his own style of writing, are bad language."

  • "In order to find out how things really are, one must understand the filters through which one perceives the world." Discuss and evaluate this claim.

    "In my final conclusion I would argue, that it is nearly impossible to understand how things really are and perceive them in the same way that others do, as everyone perceives the world differently. On the other hand, by becoming aware of their filters, one might understand each individual perception and the way of gaining knowledge. Words: 1628 This is not including the title, footnotes and poem example. 1 John Berger, Ways of Seeing (BBC and Penguin Books, London, 1983) 2 (Albert Einstein) 3 The enterprise of knowledge, John L. Tomkinson 4 stated in 1978 by the Nobel Laureate in Literature winner Isaac Bashevis Singer 5 (Hume) Amelie Kuster ToK - Long Essay 1"

Marked by a teacher

This document has been marked by one of our great teachers. You can read the full teachers notes when you download the document.

Peer reviewed

This document has been reviewed by one of our specialist student essay reviewing squad. Read the full review on the document page.

Peer reviewed

This document has been reviewed by one of our specialist student document reviewing squad. Read the full review under the document preview on this page.