• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

"Compare and contrast Orwell and Atwood's presentation of dystopian societies so far in Gilliard and Oceania"

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

"Compare and contrast Orwell and Atwood's presentation of dystopian societies so far in Gilliard and Oceania" Both Atwood and Orwell's novels are based in a dystopian societies, a society of a negative and undesirable nature. The novels both alert us to the economic, political and social affects this dystopia has on a society and the characters. In both books there is an immediate contrast between the living standards of both characters and their immediate surroundings. In Gilliard, Offred is living in a clean, simple white room, "A chair, a table, a lamp." Using ellipsis and a simple asyndetic list, Atwood has represented the room through language. In Oceania however Winston is living in filth, "...a swirl of gritty dust..." Orwell appeals to the senses here for us to understand how he lives. These living conditions are in very stark contrast even though they live in societies that restrict them; their restrictions are in different ways. Winston does not have a clean living space and Offred has nothing to do in hers, the in-depth description of her room immediately shows us how bored she is already. ...read more.

Middle

In Oceania, Winston has already rebelled and keeps a diary, "To mark the paper was the decisive act." He is taking a huge risk here; if the thought police were to catch him doing this he would face death. "He was already dead..." His own thoughts against the government are wrong. In both Offred and Winston's societies, language has been a way of oppressing them, but in different ways. In Gilliard, Offred isn't able to speak as she wishes; she is often left saying things which is deemed as the "expected response". "How I used to despise such talk. Now I long for it." Offred does not actually seem to have a truthful or even a full length conversation with anyone up to this point in the novel; she depends upon the trivial conversation to keep her sane. On the other hand in Oceania, there is a whole new language called 'newspeak'. This language was to make any 'thought crime' or alternative thinking impossible by removing any words or possible constructs which describe the ideas of freedom, rebellion and so on. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, we do not know as of yet who these people are, especially Luke. The past for her is not a nostalgic memory, "Such freedom now seems almost weightless." It just reminds her of how she used to be and how she is now. Winston on the other hand can barely remember his past; he can remember vague visions of his mother, father and sister, "He must, he thought, have been ten or eleven years old when his mother disappeared." He does not know where his family went and probably never will. This suffering extends throughout both novels, under the regimes which are in place; everyone in society suffers, whether they know it or not, not only the main characters, and this may be the most prominent theme of dystopian societies. Everyone is oppressed or brainwashed under this change in rule and culture, no one in neither '1984' or 'The Handmaid's Tale' is truly happy. In conclusion, Gilliard and Oceania have so far presented many problems being dystopian societies. They oppress those living in them; take away rights, individuality and freedom. Not only political but social restrictions have been emphasised in the two novels and most importantly how the characters are affected. ?? ?? ?? ?? Laura Williams ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level George Orwell section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level George Orwell essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    The English Patient

    5 star(s)

    Alm�sy, for example, though Hungarian by birth, is educated in England. His speech and mannerisms are so shaped by his education that many people simply assume he is English. However, Alm�sy rejects all national identity, choosing to shed "the clothes of his country" in the desert, where nationality does not matter nearly as much as character.

  2. Compare and Contrast the presentation on Edmund and Edgar in Sheakespeare's King Lear

    Unlike Edgar who is living outdoors as 'Poor Tom' and doesn't ask anyone for help even though he does not deserve to be in the position he is in. One of the main themes that Shakespeare explores in King Lear is betrayal.

  1. Compare and contrast the presentation of sex and sexuality in The Color Purple by ...

    In letter 77 Celie is "so happy...got love...work...money, friends and time". Her business meets with success and this emphasises both her self confidence and economic freedom which facilitates her freedom from patriarchy as she can earn how own living and not be dependent on Albert.

  2. How are women portrayed in The Millers Tale, The Handmaids Tale, and The Crucible?

    husband, who had committed one of the worst moral crimes that a husband could do to his wife. She is evidently very hurt by it, and it would have taken a lot of strength for her to forgive him and move on.

  1. Compare and contrast how Atwood and Orwell use language in their regimes as a ...

    "The Bible is used to justify the new way of life, but only those in power have access to the Bible, and there is no one correct interpretation of its meaning" 2 In effect, society is ruled by abusing the faith of its people and distorting the words of their holy book.

  2. Compare the disparate nature of colonial and post colonial societies in "Heart of Darkness" ...

    Moreover, the general and non specific names that the women in heart of darkness are given shows the treatment of women being poor and men clearly believing that they are more superior to women. 'The intended'. 'The aunt', 'native mistress'.

  1. How are dystopias portrayed in The Handmaids Tale and 1984?

    Of course, quotes such as ?Nothing was illegal anymore, since there were no laws.? demonstrates both male and government abuse of power, particularly during the war, and how unstable society is because of the frequent changes. Of course this leads to the peoples of both novels being somewhat ignored and ?[they are] like a child.? in how they are treated.

  2. The dehumanisation of a specific and manufactured social community is the most appealing characteristic ...

    make tragedies without social instability? epitomises the level of meditation that crafted the World State. A 1930?s reader would possibly find Mond?s manipulation of religion more frightful; the Great Depression at the time saw a resurgence of the church, due to the spiritual peace it could offer America.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work