to what extent is brutus the real tragic hero of the play?

To what extent is Brutus the real tragic hero of the play? In Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare, Marcus Brutus is a tragic hero in the play as he makes an error of judgement which brings in his downfall. As he is portrayed as noble and honourable general by many characters in the play, audience sympathises with him. Brutus is a man of high standing. Throughout the play, the audience sees Brutus as a noble and honourable man. In Act One Scene Two, the audience is hinted of the importance of Brutus when Cassius tries to persuade Brutus to join conspiracy. 'I know that virtue to be in you, Brutus, as well as I do know your outward favour.' Cassius believes that having him as a part of the conspiracy makes the assassination of Caesar look less bad and respectable because Brutus is known as a noble man to the commoners. When Brutus is about to make a speech in front of the people, plebian says that 'The noble Brutus is ascended. Silence!' showing that they think highly of Brutus. When he finishes they shout 'Let him be Caesar!' which suggests that they are all on his side. However, when Antony is doing his speech, he uses repetition of 'Brutus is an honourable man'. This repetition makes him and other conspirators seem honourable, but this serves opposite purpose making commoners feel they are not honourable. By using rhetoric speech, Antony makes plebians move from Brutus'

  • Word count: 976
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Why is Mark Antony's Speech so Effective in Persuading his Audience?

Why is Mark Antony's Speech so Effective in Persuading his Audience? Mark Antony's famous speech is a great example of a good speech. The ability of Antony to convince an audience, who at the beginning were against him, of his point of view is remarkable. I particularly love the way in which he is able to turn the word honorable around to in fact mean dishonorable. Antony confronts a crowd that is against him. In order to turn the crowd to his side he uses irony and rhetorical questions but without breaking his word, not to wrong Brutus, "I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke" Antony indirectly persuades the crowd that Brutus was wrong in killing Caesar and that Caesar's death should be avenged. The use of rhetorical questions in Antony's speech causes the crowd to question what they once thought. "You loved him once, not without cause What cause withholds you then to mourn for him?" This rhetorical question goes against Brutus by questioning his speech in which he so greatly demonized Caesar. Now the crowd is starting to turn against Brutus in favor of Antony. The audience question themselves. This in turn makes them question what Brutus once told them. 'Perhaps Brutus manipulated us to make us think along his lines', they may have questioned. He repeatedly states that "Brutus is an honorable man". The quote reveals much about the character of Brutus. Not only

  • Word count: 883
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Julius Caesar; Examine in detail paying particular attention to how the passage introduces key elements of the play

Examine in detail paying particular attention to how the passage introduces key elements of the play The following passage is taken from the first scene of the play 'Julius Caesar' by William Shakespeare. This first scene is vital as it introduces the two classes of people in the Republic of Rome and the relationship between them. Caesar is introduced in this passage to the audience but is not actually seen, which creates a figurative podium increasing the tension around his arrival and suggesting he is of great importance and standing. In this passage key elements such as: the relationship between the commoners and the tribunes, the fickleness of the people and Caesar's influence. These elements create a tumultuous mood; the Tribunes' worry and concern is juxtaposed by the general public who are rejoicing at Caesars arrival. The relationship between the commoners and the Tribunes are introduced in this play. The Tribunes use imperatives when speaking to the commoners, Murellus states "Answer me directly" this shows that he considers himself of a higher class then the people who voted for him. The Cobbler replies by using the title "...sir..." this shows that the class system in Rome is accepted universally. The Cobbler is witty and of a high intelligence. When asked "...what trade..." by Flavius he replies using a pun which is "...a mender of bad soles...". The Cobbler is

  • Word count: 865
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Comare and contrast the ways Brutus and Mark Antony use rhetoric to persuade the fickle plebeians of Rome

Ben Lander Compare the ways in which Brutus and Mark Antony make use of rhetoric to persuade the fickle masses Brutus and Mark Antony exemplify the use of in their manipulation of the fickle masses in Julius Caesar. After comparing and contrasting the way in which each speech causes the people of Rome to react, we can see that Mark Antony achieves the desired effect through his rhetoric, whereas Brutus is not able to manipulate the people. This is due to a number of factors, such as the fact that Brutus is noble man influenced by a malcontent in Cassius, leaving him out of touch with the people, whereas Antony, a physical specimen of masculinity and a great ally of Caesar, possesses the emotion to turn the people. Although Mark Antony’s use of rhetoric is more effective than that of Brutus, both men are able to influence the fickle masses. To start with, both Antony and Brutus use contrast, or antithesis to change the views of the amassed Romans. However, both men use this technique very differently; Brutus states that ‘not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more’ and this use of antithesis is done an attempt to convince the people of Rome that he did this not for his own sake but for the greater good of his country. After Brutus has left the Forum, Mark Antony states to the crowd, who’s opinion is swaying against Caesar ‘I come to bury Caesar, not

  • Word count: 800
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Shakespeare's famous Roman play opens to the scene of two Tribunes, Marullus and Flavius scolding Roman citizens for blindly worshipping Caesar. Their conversation reveals deep-seated fears that Caesar

Act I. Shakespeare's famous Roman play opens to the scene of two Tribunes, Marullus and Flavius scolding Roman citizens for blindly worshipping Caesar. Their conversation reveals deep-seated fears that Caesar is growing too powerful, too arrogant and must be stopped. Hoping to reduce the blind hero worship of Caesar, the two men remove ceremonial decorations off Caesar's "images" (statues) despite the obvious dangers of doing so... A little later, we see Caesar leading a procession through the streets of Rome. A Soothsayer or fortune teller tells Caesar to beware the "ides of March [the 15th of March]" a warning that Caesar will die on this day. It is ignored. Cassius, who fears Caesar's ever growing power, begins to recruit Brutus, a close friend of Caesar's; towards his conspiracy by implying that Caesar is becoming too powerful... We also learn that Marullus and Flavius, the two tribunes pulling decorations off Caesar's statues have been put to silence for "pulling scarfs off Caesar's images [statues]." Brutus is suspicious of Cassius' motives but tells Cassius that he will think it over... Casca, another conspirator, reveals information to Brutus that suggests Caesar may be getting more ambitious... Cassius' conspiracy gains momentum when he recruits a suspicious Casca to their cause against Caesar by pointing out that several recent strange occurrences are omens

  • Word count: 748
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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In Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare the conspirators are used by Shakespeare in highlighting the theme of friendship and betrayal as well as being the group of people who triggers the central conflict.

Discuss the Role and significance of the Conspirators In Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare the conspirators are used by Shakespeare in highlighting the theme of friendship and betrayal as well as being the group of people who triggers the central conflict. They are significant as it is through them Shakespeare examines the different forms of friendship and conveys the corruption of power. Shakespeare uses the manipulation between characters to highlight the theme of friendship and betrayal. Cassius being the mastermind behind the conspiracy is driven by envy and jealousy. He manipulates Brutus by appealing to his 'honour' and patriotism because 'our [the conspiracy's] great need of him' as 'he sits high in all the people's hearts'. The audience sees Cassius manipulating his brother out of ambition and lust for power. Similarly Decius also manipulates Calpurnia dream to lure Caesar to the capitol. He appeals to Caesars arrogance by flattering him 'most mighty Caesar' and claims that 'from you great Rome shall suck reviving blood'. The blood imagery is significant as it foreshadows the death of Caesar and to an extent the civil strife and madness of the plebeians. The moment is highly dramatic as Caesar is swayed by Decius through his rhetoric and challenge 'Lo, Caesar is afraid?' These two instances are significant and highlight the theme of friendship and betrayal.

  • Word count: 627
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Cassius' Persuasion Of Brutus

How does Cassius persuade Brutus to give him his attention and then begin to see things his way? Cassius first gets Brutus' attention through intuitive flattery as he says, "I have not from your eyes the gentleness and show of love as I was wont to have". This shows that Cassius is basing his persuasion on his friendship with Brutus because this almost gives him a level of trust, which he can use to make sure Brutus listens to him. He then suggests Brutus may be troubled in some way and Brutus says he does not know why he is in so much anguish. Cassius then says he will show Brutus himself as a mirror shows a reflection, "And since you know you cannot see yourself So well as by reflection, I, your glass, Will modestly discover to yourself That of yourself which you yet know not of." This is very clever as Cassius makes his offer sound as if he is not planting any new ideas in Brutus' head but merely exposing the thoughts already troubling Brutus. However, it is obvious that Cassius' intentions are to manipulate certain truths so that Brutus takes his point. Brutus then lets slip a crucial piece of information as he says, "I do fear the people Choose Caesar for their king". This is instantly pounced upon by Cassius who says, "Aye, do you fear it? Then I must think you would not have it so" as he sees this as a window through which he can pour his evil thoughts and work

  • Word count: 617
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Was Brutus right?

Was Brutus right? Brutus was considered as a noble man. Although he was Caesar's best friend he was forced to examine his conscience closely over the assassination of a man he loved and respected. Brutus believed in the Republic as the best form of government. Because of his love for Rome, he allowed himself to be drawn into the plot to kill Caesar, by Cassius. Brutus acted in what he thought were the best interests of Rome. The only way that Brutus could become leader was to kill Caesar. This was because in those days, the only way a leader could retire was either if they died, or someone killed them. In Roman times, the people were probably quite proud of their form of government and Caesar was not thought of too badly by the ordinary people. Therefore, his killing would have shocked them. As we see earlier in the play, the people of Rome were easily swayed; they followed anything that moved. This is shown when Caesar comes back after defeating Pompey in a war, and the crowd immediately accepted Caesar as they leader, as opposed to before Pompey's death, when they were all followers of Pompey. After knowing how the people reacted to Pompey's death, we can relate this to Caesar and Brutus. In this case, Caesar is just like Pompey and Brutus is just like Caesar, as they were also good friends. On the day of Caesar's funeral, Brutus delivered a speech to justify the

  • Word count: 549
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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