How is the theme of Childhood presented in The Lyrical Ballads?

How is the theme of Childhood presented in The Lyrical Ballads? The Romantic era ushered in a whole new way in which children were perceived. Romantics did not believe in the "Seen but not heard" attitude towards children. The Romantics often busied themselves trying to understand what made a man, what shaped a person's personality to create the adult. Three poems in The Lyrical Ballads, all by Wordsworth, deal exclusively with the theme of childhood. They are We are Seven, Anecdote for Fathers and The Idiot Boy. A famous quote by philosopher Jean-Jacques Rosseau states that "Man is born free, but everywhere he is in chains". By this he meant that we are all born without any laws or morality and that these are ideals we gain only as we age and get exposed to them by society. This sentiment is reflected in the aforementioned poems, as this belief is one of the reasons children were so celebrated by the Romantic movement, they were untainted by the societal rules forced upon them, and so were a part of nature in a way an adult could not be. In We are Seven, Wordsworth relates a conversation between the poem's narrator and a young girl. The young girl claims to have sixth brothers and sisters, however she says that two of them are dead. Despite the narrator's attempts to convince her that makes only four brothers and sisters, five overall, he eventually concedes that is

  • Word count: 1024
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Analysing closely three or four poems which we have read, say what seems to you to be typical of 'Lyrical Ballads'

Laura Summers English Literature Analysing closely three or four poems which we have read, say what seems to you to be typical of 'Lyrical Ballads' The group title of the set of poems written by Wordsworth and Coleridge presents an interesting starting point of analysis. The phrase 'Lyrical Ballads' is a paradox as the genres of 'lyrics' and 'ballads' can be defined as in opposition to each other. A 'lyric' is 'a poem about feeling... addressed to the reader in a manner of private and intimate conversation'. A 'ballad' is 'a narrative poem from an anonymous point of view, often relating to characters from public or historical events, such as war.' Therefore the two genres are combined under the title 'Lyrical Ballads', signifying an unexpected and unusual style from Wordsworth and Coleridge. This is further evidenced by Wordsworth, who said the 'Lyrical Ballads' should be seen as 'an experiment', consisting of 'poems... materially different from those under the general approbation... present bestowed' and that they may be read by some with a 'common dislike'. One aspect of the style of 'Lyrical Ballads' that caused much contempt at the time of publication is the simple language, an important characteristic of the poems. Wordsworth tries to avoid the 'falsehood of description', instead preferring to record reality in ordinary language rather than attempting a poetic

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  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Romantic Poetry

Romantic Poetry Romanticism was an artistic movement that originated in the late 18th century. It helped people express strong emotions and rebel against the industrial revolution in Britain. This caused poor living conditions and unhappiness among the people at the time. People therefore, looked to nature for beauty and improvement in society. Another factor that contributed to the development of this movement was the French Revolution, which celebrated individualism and freedom of expression. Romantic poetry was concerned with ordinary people in everyday locations, therefore the majority of society could relate to it. It focused on imagination, and relates to the 'Power of God', and philosophy. The poets were able to catch 'a moment in time' and elaborate on it with imaginative words and phrases. Of the several poems I have studied, the two Romantic poems I have chosen to represent a typical Romantic style are, 'The Daffodils' by William Wordsworth and 'I am' by John Clare. Firstly, I will look at the titles of the poems. In both poems the writer has used a simple title, indicating directly what the poem is about. This enables a larger audience to be engaged to the poem, as less literate people could find the title easier to understand. Both poems are mostly similar because of their links to the Romantic genre, in their theme and style although still continue to have an

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  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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William Wordsworth

Wordsworth is adressing the soul of the John Milton, he sees the dead poet as an idol for comtemporary British nation, and in order to give his virtous manners to society, he thinks that the poet must be alive ' at this hour'. Wordsworth is highly critical of England, the institutions such as the church, the military and especially monarchy, which lost its connection with its legendary historical value. The poem is structured as a sonnet, the octave is starting with a cry for 'Milton!' and emphasises that he should be living at this era. The reason of the existence of such a necessity is explained at the following lines, and the specific choice of John Milton is clarified at sestet. The poem has an enthusiastic tone, it starts with an outburst and ends with praises for John Milton, it is a tribute for John Milton and a critic for contemporary British nation. England describes as 'fen' and this metaphor is valid for 'altar, sword and pen', the speaker suggests that all these institutions are in a fen and waters are 'stagnant ' therefore there is no change, this situation is permanent. 'Fireside' and 'hall and bower' presumably points out houses and the British royalty with its 'heroic wealth'. The poet claims that the Monarchy 'forfeited' their heritafe of happiness, the rhyme at 'bower' and 'dower ' drawing the words together in meaning as in sound, and with the rhyme at

  • Word count: 639
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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How does Wordsworth portray real people in The Lyrical Ballads?

How does Wordsworth portray real people in The Lyrical Ballads? Lyrical Ballads, and in particular the Preface to Lyrical Ballads, is considered a central work of Romantic literary theory. In it, Wordsworth discusses what he sees as the elements of a new type of poetry, one based on the "real language of men" and the work itself avoids the poetic diction of much eighteenth-century poetry, whose most famous exponent was John Milton in Paradise Lost, which benefitted from drastic overuse of verbose Latinate vocabulary. He felt this wasn't an accurate reflection of real people, and sought to portray them through using language which they used. In the Preface to Lyrical Ballads, Wordsworth famously described poetry as the "spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings from emotions recollected in tranquility", and wrote to justify - in theoretical terms - his practice of writing a new and "experimental" poetry, one whose language is "fitting to metrical arrangement a selection of the real language of men in a state of vivid sensation." He rejected the Miltonic approach to poetry, and instead favoured much more Anglo-Saxon words, for their gritty implications - appropriate for a publication in which most of the poems are focused around everyday people and situations. Unsurprisingly, these are very pastoral poems, many of which solely include narrative. Although this may seem mundane

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  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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The Romantic Turn in Poetry; Mimeticism vs. Expressivity in William Wordsworth's "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud"

The Romantic turn in poetry; Mimeticism vs. Expressivity William Wordsworth's "I Wandered Lonely As a Cloud" The different forms of literature can be categorized according to a model by M. H. Abrams. universe work artist audience The dominant relation between these terms at various times defined what was considered literature. If literature was defined by the relation work-universe, it was called Mimeticism; if it was work-artist, is was called Expressivity; if it was work-audience, it was called Pragmatism. There is also a fourth category concentrating only on the text itself, called Objectivity. Of these four forms of literature mentioned, we are going to focus mainly on the first two. Mimeticism The oldest conception of literature and the most enduring one is Mimeticism. Mimeticism can be defined as the imitation of already existing things in nature and literature. Therefore epics and drama were considered the highest forms of literature. It was first defined by Plato, who used it derogatively to describe all kinds of art and literature as mimetic and therefore not useful for finding truth. It was Aristotle who made Mimeticism one of the most important features of poetry. Thus poetry became equal with history and philosophy. In the Renaissance poets mainly focused on Ancient Greek epics and again put focus on Mimeticism. In the middle of the 18th

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  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Wordsworth and Coleridge saw themselves as "worshippers of nature." How is this demonstrated in Lyrical Ballads?

Wordsworth and Coleridge saw themselves as "worshippers of nature." How is this demonstrated in Lyrical Ballads? (an exam-style essay) Themes relating to nature are instrumental in the poetry collection Lyrical Ballads by William Wordworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge. As part of the Romantic movement, both poets strongly believed in a power and supreme beauty of nature and the education it can impart onto man, and their works in Lyrical Ballads demonstrate this. In 'The Dungeon', Coleridge demonstrates his view that nature has healing properties and that it would be a more effective method of rehabilitating criminals than the usual method of locking them away in prison would be - an elevated view of nature and its power. He justifies this opinion using glorious imagery describing nature as he sees it, with the intent of portraying its complete beauty. Thy sunny hues, fair forms, and breathing sweets, Thy melodies of woods, and winds, and waters, Coleridge also uses a direct contrast and juxtaposition with this and the dark imagery used in the first stanza to emphasise the beauty of nature. He also does this to demonstrate that the dark and horrible dungeon and the free and beautiful nature are polar opposites, and ultimately to come to the conclusion that they have similar effects on criminals. Circled with evil, till his very soul Unmoulds its essence, hopelessly

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  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Form and meaning of The Daffodils by W.Wordsworth and Miracle on St.David’s Day by G.Clarke. Pre and Post C20th Poetry Comparison.

Caroline Piggott Compare and Contrast the language, Sep 2001 Form and meaning of The Daffodils by W.Wordsworth and Miracle on St.David's Day by G.Clarke. Pre and Post C20th Poetry Comparison. William Wordsworth wrote the poem "The Daffodils" in 1804, two years later after his experience with the Daffodils. The poem "Miracle on St. David's Day" was written by Gillian Clarke around 1980. Miracle on St. David's Day was written one hundred and seventy-six years after The Daffodils was. The poems are very similar in the way that they both look like poems, having a regular structure. In "Miracle on St. David's Day" each stanza apart from the last one has five lines that are all about the same length. In "The Daffodils" each stanza has six lines that are all about the same length. The poems are different in the way that "Miracle on St. David's Day" was written like a story, sentences starting in one stanza and finishing in another. Also this poem does not rhyme, it looks like a poem but sounds like prose. "The Daffodils" is written as a poem with a regular rhyming pattern. Line one and line three rhyme, line two and line four, and line five and six are a rhyming couplet. This is regular throughout the poem. Both poems are similar as they are true experiences of the writers, and they are written in Modern English. Also the poems are both narrative poems. William Wordsworth

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  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Compare how the two poets handle their subject matter in the poems To Daffodils by Robert Herrick and The Daffodils by William Wordsworth.

Compare how the two poets handle their subject matter in the poems To Daffodils by Robert Herrick and The Daffodils by William Wordsworth. In this essay I am going to look at two poems written by Robert Herrick and William Wordsworth called "To Daffodils" and "Daffodils". At first it is useful to look at the biographical details of the poets studied. The two poems are very similar in topic they choose to write about but they handle their material differently. The content of Robert Herrick's poem is about the short life span of daffodils and relating it by saying that the human race life is also short. The poem is quite depressing as it is mainly about the passing away of the daffodils/humans. The poem also describes how time passes away quickly (the word 'haste' appears a few times) and eventually we all get old and die. I think that the daffodils in his poem relate to people-perhaps he got some inspiration as such from the civil war when he could of possibly lost friend(s) and/or family, making him realise that life is too short and he expresses his emotions using the daffodils instead of people as daffodils live for little time (approx. 1 season). The content of William Wordsworth poem is relating to a wide range of thoughts. Wordworth's poems are not depressing like Herrick's but have a light, optimistic sense to them. Robert Herrick was born in London in 1591 and

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  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Compare the theme of loneliness in the 'The daffodils or the inward eye' and 'miracle of saint Davids day'.

Loneliness is a blissful thing in the 'The Daffodils or the inward eye' however it is horrific in the 'Miracle of saint David's day'. In the 'miracle o.s.day' it uses short sentences but in 'Daffodils' it uses long sentences, there is a brief quote to show my point, "They stretched in a never-ending line along the margin of a bay." This quote clearly shows how long the sight is, the thousands of daffodils, this is called an enjambment. It is very effective. 'Daffodils' is written in an iambic tetrameter, but the 'Miracle o.s.day' has a free rhythm. The 'Daffodils' rhythm is like a dance; this is called a hypnotic rhythm. The poet feels lonely and wants to be a part of the dance. We feel lonely and know this as the poetry is in a hypnotic rhythm, there is a brief quote in the poem telling us as readers that the daffodils are dancing, it gives us an image in our heads that the daffodils were dancing and so was the poet. "Ten thousand saw I glance, tossing their heads in sprightly dance." Both 'Daffodils and 'Miracle' has a person, and relives what he has seen and allows the person to break out. Both poem's are in the past tense, and are writing about a person or something else. In the 'Miracle o.s.day' there is a use of an oxymoron together but has been used together are 'sun' and 'cage'. "In a cage of first march sun a woman sits not listening, not seeing, not feeling." By

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  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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