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AS and A Level: F. Scott Fitzgerald

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  • Marked by Teachers essays 6
  • Peer Reviewed essays 6
  1. Peer reviewed

    Symbolism in the Great Gatsby

    5 star(s)

    These parties were a corruption of 'The American Dream' because 'The Dream' was no longer about achieving a better life than your parents, however in the eyes of money americans 'better' translated to 'richer', so the thirst for money depicted in the novel, is symbolic for the attitudes of both men and women in 1920's America. Nick explains in chapter 9, that the American Dream was originally about discovery, individualism, and the pursuit of happiness. However it has been changed by the rise of the residents of West egg (the "new money"), and with them came their relaxed social values.

    • Word count: 938
  2. Peer reviewed

    Was Gatsby Great

    5 star(s)

    It could also symbolise the act of Gatsby's life in the novel. Fitzgerald presents Gatsby as living a luxurious life, with plenty of friends, no worries and an honest man. Yet by the end of the novel his whole illusion unravels and the reader discovers that he has many problems, he is dishonest and has no true friends. One of the ways in which Gatsby is 'great' is the fact that he is extremely wealthy and owns many material items such as a yellow station wagon and a "Rolls-Royce". Fitzgerald uses descriptive words such as "hulking patent cabinets', "massed suits" and "shirts pilled up like bricks in stacks a dozen high" to emphasise Gatsby's luxurious lifestyle.

    • Word count: 554
  3. Peer reviewed

    What literary techniques does F. Scott Fitzgerald use to present Gatsby's party in Chapter III of the novel.

    5 star(s)

    The chapter opens up with a very descriptive and detailed introduction given to us by Nick. He seems to give us a lavish description of one of Gatsby's summer night parties, Nick seems to be looking on from his house watching the party in his usual voyeuristic fashion. It's possible that he's maybe slightly envious of the guests, possibly wishing to be there himself; it seems to give the reader that impression as the chapter goes on. This could be a good reason for the extra amount of descriptiveness.

    • Word count: 981
  4. Peer reviewed

    What do you think of the view that obsession with money and the new consumer culture of the 1920s dominates human thinking and behaviour in The Great Gatsby?

    4 star(s)

    Daisy and Gatsby were together in the past and before she hears Jordan mention his name she doesn't appear to have shown any interest in contacting him. She is also hesitant to go to Gatsby's house without Nick, who she then allows to leave after she's been shown around and seen what wealth Gatsby has. Gatsby associates wealth with Daisy, "Her voice is full of money". This suggests that Daisy produces a sense that she has always been provided for, and educated around rich people, so she speaks as they would, in a carefree manner that those who do not have a lot of money don't have.

    • Word count: 611
  5. Peer reviewed

    Discuss the presentation of Gatsby's character through Carraway's narrative perspective

    4 star(s)

    drift casually out of nowhere and buy a place in Long Island Sand'. Here, the narrative tone is assertive, and the reader is being told outright that such a thing just didn't happen. The perspective here is perhaps a little suspicious of Gatsby, and is certainly curious; Carraway is questioning how Gatsby acquired his wealth and, in doing so, influencing the reader to do the same. Fitzgerald releases little rumours about Gatsby via guests at Gatsby's parties; due to Carraway's perspective, the reader is unable to ascertain which are true instantly, thus enhancing the mystery that seems to surround Gatsby; one persistent rumour is that 'he was a German spy during the war', another that 'he killed a man'.

  6. Peer reviewed

    Myrtle's Tragic Achievement - The Great Gatsby.

    4 star(s)

    This all will lead to her "tragic" achievement. The affair between Tom and Myrtle has spoiled her. On a visit to New York City, Myrtle "let four taxicabs drive away before she selected a new one, lavender-colored with grey upholstery" (Fitzgerald 31). During the taxi ride, she spotted a man selling a dozen puppies in a basket hanging from his neck. She demanded that Tom purchase her one. He bought her an Airedale for the outrageous amount of ten dollars. Tom also bought Myrtle her own apartment in the city.

    • Word count: 597

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • Discuss the presentation of Gatsby's character through Carraway's narrative perspective

    "In conclusion, Gatsby is presented by Carraway's Narrative Perspective as being an isolated figure, who is initially shrouded in mystery, which soon fades, leaving the hollow, superficial nature of Gatsby exposed to Carraway and reader alike. The narrative then reveals that in fact Gatsby's wealth, although acquired through shady deals during the Prohibition, was all done in pursuit of Daisy. This infatuation is presented by Carraway's narrative as Gatsby being a 'man in love' who 'came alive' in his love for Daisy. However, whether or not his pursuit of Daisy is true love is questionable. It is certain that Carraway admires, even idolises Gatsby, despite his reservations, because of something 'beautiful' he sees about Gatsby. Harry Dayantis"

  • To what extent and in what ways is Fitzgerald purely critical of Gatsby?

    "Due to Fitzgerald's seeming disregard for Daisy in the novel, I believe that he is critical of Gatsby's dream to be with her. However, I believe the other aspects of his presentation linking to dreams in a wider context prevent this view from seeming as if he is purely critical of it - the way that he suggests dreams are important to human nature and separate Gatsby from the crowd imply that Fitzgerald finds dreaming admirable, to an extent. For him to be purely critical I believe that he would have to feel purely critical of dreaming in general, which I believe not to be the case. Therefore, I believe the conclusion that Fitzgerald is critical to an extent is far more feasible and takes into account the more positive aspects of dreaming that he seems to incorporate and believe in."

  • Discuss the presentation of Gatsby's character through Carraway's narrative perspective

    "In conclusion, Gatsby is presented by Carraway's Narrative Perspective as being an isolated figure, who is initially shrouded in mystery, which soon fades, leaving the hollow, superficial nature of Gatsby exposed to Carraway and reader alike. The narrative then reveals that in fact Gatsby's wealth, although acquired through shady deals during the Prohibition, was all done in pursuit of Daisy. This infatuation is presented by Carraway's narrative as Gatsby being a 'man in love' who 'came alive' in his love for Daisy. However, whether or not his pursuit of Daisy is true love is questionable. It is certain that Carraway admires, even idolises Gatsby, despite his reservations, because of something 'beautiful' he sees about Gatsby."

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