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AS and A Level: F. Scott Fitzgerald

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  1. Marked by a teacher

    How do Scott Fitzgerald and Hunter S thompson portray the villain in 'Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas' and 'The Great Gatsby'

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    obviously a tested and proved theory that has worked in the past and so is likely to work again. This can be seen as Thompson portraying Gonzo's awareness of Raoul's submissive nature and weakness to succumb to a life of grotesque self indulgence; and also his unfailing ability to manipulate this. Tom Buchanan is presented as a hypocritical bully, and in some respects Dr Gonzo can also be seen as one. Tom and Daisy can be likened to Raoul and Dr Gonzo, when Nick says that they leave other people to pay for the consequences of their actions. Raoul and Gonzo leave a path of destruction everywhere they go, and it can be argued, so do Tom and Daisy.

    • Word count: 3074
  2. The American Dream is what drives the characters in Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby.

    Another character who believes he deserves more power and influence is Tom Buchanan. Tom is already powerful, rich, and has a beautiful daughter and wife. Tom is not satisfied with that. The American Dream to him means he deserves more. One woman is not enough for Tom, he wants two. He also feels that he gets more power because of his mistress Myrtle. Because Myrtle is of a lower class he has complete over her. Myrtle depends on Tom to get her into a better society, closer to The American Dream. Tom knows this and he eats it all up, but he never lets Myrtle rise above her station.

    • Word count: 4492

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • Discuss the presentation of Gatsby's character through Carraway's narrative perspective

    "In conclusion, Gatsby is presented by Carraway's Narrative Perspective as being an isolated figure, who is initially shrouded in mystery, which soon fades, leaving the hollow, superficial nature of Gatsby exposed to Carraway and reader alike. The narrative then reveals that in fact Gatsby's wealth, although acquired through shady deals during the Prohibition, was all done in pursuit of Daisy. This infatuation is presented by Carraway's narrative as Gatsby being a 'man in love' who 'came alive' in his love for Daisy. However, whether or not his pursuit of Daisy is true love is questionable. It is certain that Carraway admires, even idolises Gatsby, despite his reservations, because of something 'beautiful' he sees about Gatsby. Harry Dayantis"

  • To what extent and in what ways is Fitzgerald purely critical of Gatsby?

    "Due to Fitzgerald's seeming disregard for Daisy in the novel, I believe that he is critical of Gatsby's dream to be with her. However, I believe the other aspects of his presentation linking to dreams in a wider context prevent this view from seeming as if he is purely critical of it - the way that he suggests dreams are important to human nature and separate Gatsby from the crowd imply that Fitzgerald finds dreaming admirable, to an extent. For him to be purely critical I believe that he would have to feel purely critical of dreaming in general, which I believe not to be the case. Therefore, I believe the conclusion that Fitzgerald is critical to an extent is far more feasible and takes into account the more positive aspects of dreaming that he seems to incorporate and believe in."

  • Discuss the presentation of Gatsby's character through Carraway's narrative perspective

    "In conclusion, Gatsby is presented by Carraway's Narrative Perspective as being an isolated figure, who is initially shrouded in mystery, which soon fades, leaving the hollow, superficial nature of Gatsby exposed to Carraway and reader alike. The narrative then reveals that in fact Gatsby's wealth, although acquired through shady deals during the Prohibition, was all done in pursuit of Daisy. This infatuation is presented by Carraway's narrative as Gatsby being a 'man in love' who 'came alive' in his love for Daisy. However, whether or not his pursuit of Daisy is true love is questionable. It is certain that Carraway admires, even idolises Gatsby, despite his reservations, because of something 'beautiful' he sees about Gatsby."

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