Lord of the Flies: The Darkness of Man's Heart

Lord of the Flies: The Darkness of Man’s Heart William Golding’s Lord of the Flies is more than a tale about a group of boys stranded on an island during World War II. Life free from rules of society and adults seems like paradise, but it quickly turns into hell on earth. The boys face the ultimate challenge of remaining civilized without supervision or guidelines. Many elements are found within Lord of the Flies: breakdown of civilization, avoidance of truth, and assumed innocence. These elements appear to be the message Golding is trying to convey. However, carefully analyzing the novel, the reader is able to detect symbolism. The author hides powerful messages behind his characters and other objects on the island. Through the use of symbolism, Golding reveals that humans detached from society’s rules allow their innate evil to dominate their existence. By introducing the characters of Ralph and Piggy, Golding shows his first use of symbolism. He introduces them as well-bred British boys and uses them to reflect man’s nature within society. Ralph represents civilized man, and Piggy symbolizes the intelligence of civilization. Ralph is elected leader because he has the appearance, common sense, and his possession of the conch makes him respected (Golding 22). Since he has been elected leader, he is able to enforce rules to govern the island. These rules include:

  • Word count: 2677
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Lord of the Flies Close Reading Analysis

Lord of the Flies Close Reading Analysis Leading up to the passage, Ralph’s former followers have either abandoned him or been killed. The rest of the boys are now under the rule of Jack. To obtain full superiority over all of the boys, Jack feels that he must kill Ralph. As Jack and the rest of the boys hunt down Ralph, Jack sets fire to the island. A passing naval ship sees the smoke from the fire and heads toward the island. Ralph runs out of the jungle and falls on the sand beach, closely followed by Jack and the hunters, and immediately Ralph finds himself at the feet of a naval officer. Throughout the passage, Golding creates a contrast between the images of the boys and the officer. The boys are described as savage and wild messes, while the officer is described as orderly and clean. Despite these different visual images both have the same underlying quality: a violent human nature. The author provides detailed visual images of the boys when they are found on the island by the naval officer. Golding describes Ralph as being “filthy.” Later, he is compared to a “scarecrow” and is thought by the officer to be in need of a “bath,” “haircut,” “nose-wipe,” and “ointment.” The other boys are also described in great detail by Golding. As Jack’s boys come out of the jungle yelling, their screams are described as “ululations.” As

  • Word count: 1064
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Summary of The Spire

Summary. Jocelin, Dean of a medieval cathedral, has had a vision which he believes reveals that he must add a four hundred foot spire to the cathedral. The decision is a controversial one, especially as the work proves disruptive and the master builder, Roger Mason, discovers that the building lacks the requisite foundations to support the spire. Jocelin is insistent that faith will be sufficient and accuses the master builder of being timid, and of playing for time in order to keep himself and his men in employment. Jocelin is maintained in his belief that the spire will stand by the news that his bishop is sending a Holy Nail (from the crucifixion) from Rome to protect the spire. The cathedral's caretaker, Pangall, hates the disruption and the workmen's mockery which he suffers. There are early hints that he is impotent. Jocelin is horrified when he notices that Roger and Goody, Pangall's wife, are sexually attracted to each other. However, he realises that, if he does not intervene, their adultery will prevent Roger from leaving. Roger's wife Rachel reveals that she and her husband are childless because she finds sex makes her laugh. Jocelin climbs to the roof to inspect the work and finds it exhilarating. However, he has what is eventually revealed to be tuberculosis of the spine, and this illness gradually becomes worse. He is also increasingly troubled by sexual

  • Word count: 1191
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Lord of the Flies Summary

The Lord of the Flies Précis After a plane crash, two boys, Piggy and Ralph, find each other on a deserted island. Piggy discovers a conch shell on the beach, and tells Ralph he could use it to call other survivors. Soon, young boys begin appearing out of the woods, including a choir led by a boy named Jack. The group of survivors elects Ralph as there leader, and Ralph allows Jack to become the head of a hunting party. The boys explore the island, finding no signs of civilization. On their way back to the beach, they come across a pig, but Jack is unable to bring himself to kill it. Ralph uses the conch shell to call the boys to another meeting, where they decide that each boy may only speak while holding the conch. They decide that a fire signal must always be maintained at the top of the mountain to increase their chances of being rescued. Piggy agrees to allow them to use his glasses to start the fire. However, after neglecting to monitor their first fire, part of the island is sent up in flames. and one of the younger boys goes missing. Ralph and another boy, Simon, construct huts for the survivors to live in, and Ralph is irritated when all of the other boys spend their time playing rather than helping. After attempting to express this problem to Jack, Ralph finds that although Jack's hunting party is not making any progress, hunting is all Jack cares

  • Word count: 1054
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Higher - Lord of the Flies - Character not in harmony with his society

Section B - Q8: Choose a novel in which one of the main characters is not in harmony with his society. Describe the character's situation and go on to discuss how it adds to your understanding of the central concern of the text. In the novel "Lord of the Flies" by William Golding, Jack Merridew, one of the principal characters, is not in harmony with his society. He is a strong-willed, egomaniacal boy, who is the novel's representative of the instinct of savagery, violence, and brute power. From the first glimpse of his meeting with the other boys on the beach, to the very end of the novel where he sets up his own society, we can see that he conforms neither to the rules by which our society lives, nor to Ralph's rules when he attempts at recreating such a society on the island, letting his primitive urges take over. After the boys' plane has crashed on the island, starting the novel, Ralph and Piggy realise the need for the boys to gather and work together to help each other and try to be rescued. Ralph blows the conch to summon the others, and Piggy tries to learn the names of the boys who come. Then, the choirboys come, commanded by Jack, in a regimented group. Jack immediately queries Ralph's authority: " 'We'd better all have names,' said Ralph, 'so I'm Ralph.' 'We got most names,' said Piggy. 'Got 'em just now.' 'Kids' names,' said Merridew. 'Why should I be Jack?

  • Word count: 1152
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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What do you consider to be the key message of 'The Spire', and how does Golding present this?

What do you consider to be the key message of 'The Spire', and how does Golding present this? Since Golding is writing about the human condition, there are a great many 'messages' that could be considered. However, a recurring theme that follows Jocelin is that of cost and sacrifice - most particularly, is it worh sacrificing lives in order to achieve something like the spire? The element of cost is one Jocelin keeps returning to, and it plays a large part in his realisations at the end. As a man of faith, sacrifice is clearly a large part of his life. If Jocelin was not the dean, or not a priest at all, he would be unlikely to have such undying faith and willingness to sacrifice for it. Jocelin is the sort of man who can easily become obsessed, and so sometimes the moral implications of what he does do not seem important. What I think Golding is attempting to show is that all elements of an action must be carefully considered before it is carried out. All possible consequences should be thought through and fully accepted. From the very beginning, Golding mentions sacrifice, sometimes in more subtle ways than others. On the first page, a reference is made to 'Abraham and Isaac'. At surface level, this story seems irrelevant - Jocelin is exultant, convinced he is finally able to do the will of God, and thr story of Abraham could be seen as a tragic one. Abraham is told by God

  • Word count: 1413
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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What does chapter one of "The Spire" reveal about Jocelin and his attitude to other people? How does Golding's language reveal the extent to which he deceives himself?

What does chapter one of "The Spire" reveal about Jocelin and his attitude to other people? How does Golding's language reveal the extent to which he deceives himself? The first chapter of William Golding's novel "The Spire" reveals much about Jocelin's attitude to the people around him and also the contrary view that others hold about it. The language Golding uses highlights Jocelin's delusions and shows the reader just how much he deceives himself. Throughout the first chapter we are introduced to many of the people that Jocelin encounters on a daily basis. One of the first characters to appear is Goody Pangall, who Jocelin views as his 'daughter in God'. This phrase shows how much Jocelin admires Goody and, at first, appears to simply demonstrate more of Jocelin's loving nature. However, after reading the following paragraph where he watches her walking away from him 'with love and a little disappointment', it becomes clear that the sentence holds more meaning than just showing his fondness. It shows up Jocelin's somewhat obsessive character, suggesting he views Goody as being flawless and that he has idealised her to the point where he can imagine her as God's daughter. As Jocelin thinks 'my daughter' it becomes apparent that he has deceived himself into thinking that he loves Goody as if she were just his daughter but Golding makes it clear to the reader that this

  • Word count: 1725
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Lord of The Flies Web Quest

Lord of The Flies Web Quest SURVIVAL MANUAL Tuna Özoguz Yagmur Kan 9/C (16.04.2007) THE CONCH Tibia Insulaechorab How the conch's used & its significance o The leader will be chosen every Sunday so that everyone will be able to experience how to be a leader o There will be a conch ceremony while changing the group leader. The leader will wear the conch with its chain all week long. o The conch will be used by the leader to gather everyone, to quieten the group and to let somebody speak. o The conch symbolizes leadership and authority. The person who has it is different from the others. The leader with his conch has to organize all the stuff related to the island and people. MAP OF THE ISLAND Ways to get food & water * A group of 3 or 4 people will be fishing three times a week. The fisher group will be changed every week after the conch ceremony so that just one group of people won't be fed up with fishing during the life on island. Also, fishing group will be responsible for getting other types of seafood. * Water will be kept in holes which are covered with leaves and rocks -so that the water won't be absorbed- Purification tablets may be used . * The food will be cooked on fire made by using a magnifying glass. * Other kinds of food will be fruits and vegetables.(if possible) The fisher group will be responsible for hunting for the rest of the days

  • Word count: 377
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Elliot Stretched out his arms as he woke up from a restless night of sleep

A day in the Life of a littl'un - Lord of the Flies Elliot Stretched out his arms as he woke up from a restless night of sleep. Poor Elliot was too afraid to sleep, afraid of the mysterious beastie. In the night he could hear a continuous whispering coming from outside the shelter, the whispering turned into nightmares. After rubbing away the sleep from his delicate eyes with his grubby hands he remembered all the bad dreams from the darkness of the night. These brought a tear to his eye as he remembered the comforts of home. Memories were slowly fading as time went on in the jungle. Slowly he made his way out of the shelter and was greeted by another boy shouting "El! El!" Without thinking about helping the bigguns with the fire or even hunting he just went and joined with the others. The boy, who had called him over, Mikey, greeted Elliot with a playful punch. "I'll race ya!" screamed Elliot as he began running towards he luscious sea. Mikey ran after him. As they dived into the water and were splashing each other a loud came from the conch they reluctantly wondered back to the shelters. Ralph greeted them as the rest of the children flocked in. Most of the Littluns just stand there and do not listen unless it is about the beastie. Today Ralph was trying to explain certain matters of which Elliot just did not take in, Jack kept on interrupting and after a while the

  • Word count: 658
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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The Spire

Explain how Golding establishes the main themes of The Spire through his portrayal of Jocelin in the first five chapters of The Spire. The bent and twisted hunchback Jocelin is the cornerstone for interpreting and bringing forth the multitude of interesting themes within the novel. Through Golding's experience of World War II, he established many scathing criticisms of humanity in his literature. In The Spire this is represented by the character of Jocelin, a Dean of a nameless cathedral obsessed with the vision of erecting a four-hundred foot spire. Jocelin is the penultimate antihero, the introduction of the story tells us how "He was laughing chin up, and shaking his head. God the father was exploding in his face." It defies the expectations of what context a Dean would place God into, especially in humour, so very early on into this novel are these very slight and gentle implications of corruption, this is also exacerbated when the slight phallic pun of "Eighteen inches" is joked by Golding, and we get a sense of..."expecting the reverse" in the chapters to come. Jocelin later lustfully examines Goody Pangall, what is interesting to note is to note is how Jocelin refers to her while looking at her, he mentions her only as "Pangall's wife" which is incredibly reminiscent of Steinbeck's Of Mice And Men where the female of the story is only referred to as "Curley's

  • Word count: 1540
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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