Analyse the presentation of horror in Frankenstein

Analyse the presentation of horror in ‘Frankenstein’. To understand how horror is presented within a gothic horror novel we must first understand the aim of such, its purpose, it should “speak to the mysterious fears of our nature, and awaken thrilling horror- one to make the reader dread to turn around.” ‘Frankenstein’ is one of the definitive novels of the Gothic horror of the 18th century. While many of this genre focused on ghosts, ghouls and the paranormal, Mary Shelley focuses on the paranormal, the impossible, and the (at the time) unknown, to evoke a sense of terror and dread. “People fear what they don’t understand and hate what they can’t conquer.”- Andrew Smith. ‘Frankenstein’ creates horror through fear endorsing atmospheres and imagery. “By the glimmer of the half extinguished light… morning, dismal, wet... although drenched by rain which poured from a black comfortless sky.” Darkness is used to create a sense of dread and foreboding, leaving the reader wondering, “What is hidden in the shadows?” This is psychological torment for both the reader and Victor, rather than physical torment. The weather is used through pathetic fallacy to allude to, or reference things to come, “then, for an instant everything seemed of a pitchy darkness” the weather instantly shifts, to prepare the reader for the appearance of the creature; it

  • Word count: 918
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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This essay will focus on the way Walton's letters bring out the main themes that will increase the reader's understanding of the rest of the novel

This essay will focus on the way Walton's letters bring out the main themes that will increase the reader's understanding of the rest of the novel. In Walton's letter, an important character is introduced, Victor Frankenstein. In the second letter, Walton regrets his lack of friends. He feels lonely and remote, unable to find a space in this world for him. When Walton meets the stranger, he picks him up as a friend he always wanted to have. Walton's desire for companionship resembles the monster's desire for a friend throughout the novel when he realizes he doesn't speak the same language as the other people he meets. This parallel between Victor and Walton seems to show that the two have things in common The desire for knowledge and its impacts are important in these letters. The stranger tells Walton, "You seek for knowledge and wisdom, as I once did; and I ardently hope that the gratification of your wishes may not be a serpent to sting you, as mine has been." Walton, like Frankenstein is captivated by the desire to learn, and try to find answers to things no one knows about: "What may not be expected in a country of eternal light?" Finally, Victor and Walton both have very loving family backgrounds. The beginning of the book starts with Walton sending letters to his sister Margaret to update her tells her that he is safe. Victor, on his side, is very loving to

  • Word count: 908
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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To what extent do you agree with the view that, in Frankenstein, Mary Shelley is exploring 'the dark side of the human psyche'?

To what extent do you agree with the view that, in Frankenstein, Mary Shelley is exploring 'the dark side of the human psyche'? Shelley explores the dark side of the human psyche in her novel Frankenstein through her characters and their actions. By this I am referring to the actions of Victor in the novel, his creation of the monster and then his hatred towards it and also the monsters actions in the crimes he committed throughout the text. I believe that Shelley explores the dark side of the human psyche by creating a very thin line between humanity and becoming a monster again through her characters, who are very closely linked, Victor and his monster. At the beginning of the novel Shelley presents Victor as having a very positive attitude towards life, he and his family live together in an almost 'perfect' existence, "much as they were attached to each other, they seemed to draw inexhaustible stores of affection from a very mine of love to bestow them upon me." Shelley includes this quotation in the novel as she is laying the groundwork for the reader, she wants her readers to understand the two sides of Victor, the beginning when he is very loving and happy, compared to the rest of the novel where he becomes distraught and bordering on mad, "nothing is more painful to the human mind..." This quotation shows the reader that Shelley meant Victor to be very hyperbolic,

  • Word count: 888
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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comparison, victor and monster

Compare the characters of the creature and Victor Frankenstein, and consider the importance of this comparison. In Mary Shelly's Frankenstein, she draws a flow of contrast within the characters of the creature and Victor Frankenstein. She manipulates the differences and similarities in an effective way. Most of these she presents through their words, expressions, thoughts and emotions throughout the novel. The first presentation of contrast between the two is that they are both 'alike', by mentioning this word, I do not refer to physical resemblance as one may think, infact I am looking at the characteristic likelihood of Victor and the creature. Victor creates the monster to be like himself, he did not however, plan his creation to become like him, but it did indeed. The monster does not resemble Victor physically however; instead they share the same personalities. For example, they are both loving beings, they both want to help others and want what is best for them, even though they do not manage to accomplish that. As the character of the creature, Shelly provides us with some information about the monster before it has even been created. Things such as that he is being created from parts taken from morgues and graves. We also know that his limbs have been stitched together as we also told that he is going to be eight feet tall. These facts show that his physical

  • Word count: 873
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Frankenstein. The creature in Frankenstein plays an important role in the novel. Mary Shelly writes good and bad aspects of the creature, that makes the audience sympathise for it

Frankenstein is a Gothic horror novel written in 1816 by Mary Shelly. Shelley had set Frankenstein in the year of 1794 - the turn over of the century - the era of scientific advancements. Mary Shelley describes a portrayal of the monster in Frankenstein and comments on her time throughout her novel. Shelley explores the conflict of science and religion, and uses this idea in her own novel to describe the advancement of science in her time, and how the idea of religion and "playing God" had a significant impact in the book. During the time when Mary Shelley was writing her novel, she was reading a book called "Emile" written by Rousseau. In this book he argues that man's nature is harmless but that men are made evil by society. Men become monsters; by the way they are treated. However, he says that a man abandoned to himself in the midst of other men from birth would be the most disfigured of all. This debate is at the heart of the book: the monster is born good but becomes wicked because people abuse and reject him. Worst of all, his creator Victor Frankenstein refuses to grant him his natural right of freedom, equality and fraternity. The creature in Frankenstein plays an important role in the novel. Mary Shelly writes good and bad aspects of the creature, that makes the audience sympathise for it. The monster was at first described ugly by the creator himself Victor

  • Word count: 867
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Frankenstein: "Irony is what drives the plot." Discuss.

Transfer-Encoding: chunked This is an unfair assessment as irony in the novel is used by Shelley to enhance the plot, and not as a driving force of the storyline. Irony is used in the novel to highlight how monstrosity is not defined by one’s outward appearance, but by one’s actions. Irony does not drive the plot but rather enhances the plot development, as it essentially challenges our judgement of an individual’s appearance in relation to our perception of his intentions. For example, the creature’s interaction with the drowning girl, where he “saved” her and “dragged her to shore” paints a striking picture of the moment, where he risks his life to rescue the girl without hesitation. This portrays the creature’s apparent willingness to put aside his will for self-preservation to jump into the water to save the helpless girl. The monster’s selflessness and compassion for the humans around him is contrasted with his ragged physical appearance, where his “watery eyes”, “shrivelled complexion” and “straight black lips” serves as a reminder of the presence of death in his complexion. His existence thus is ironic as his gentle treatment of the girl is inconsistent and the opposite of his distorted, deathly physical appearance. The creature’s kindness and sacrifice are not acknowledged in lieu of his monstrous appearance, where the companion

  • Word count: 852
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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What views of 'mankind' does the Romantic writer, Mary Shelley, present in Frankenstein?

What views of 'mankind' does the Romantic writer, Mary Shelley, present in Frankenstein? Mary Shelley was writing shortly after the French Revolution and at a time when numerous scientific theories were being put forward. She was the daughter of two radical thinkers Mary Wollstonecraft and William Godwin, married to the romantic poet Percy Shelley and she was very well read. Hence it was inevitable that her view of 'mankind' would incorporate many different aspects. At the start of the book we see the romantic character Walton preparing to set out on a journey of discovery to the North Pole. Walton exhibits many aspects of the romantic - he is self-educated, has a love of nature, he is ambitious wanting to discover a passage to the North Pole: 'I am going to unexplored regions to 'the land of mist and snow'; but I shall kill no albatross.' and he sees the importance of friendship and feels the lack of it has a serious disadvantage 'I bitterly feel the want of a friend'. Shelley has used the epistolary style of writing in this part of the novel and this enables the reader to quickly get into the story and creates an air of realism. Walton's ambitions are a mirror of Frankenstein's and we see two characters who have become obsessed with the pursuit of knowledge believing that they are doing it for the good of mankind rather than any material wealth. Walton's 'insanity' being

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  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Many critics have commented that the creature is ultimately a character with whom we can sympathise. Explore Shelleys presentation of the creature in the light of this view.

Many critics have commented that the creature is ultimately a character with whom we can sympathise. Explore Shelley’s presentation of the creature in the light of this view. The way Mary Shelley presents Frankenstein’s monster challenges society and their views on morality. Her aim seems to be to make the creature seem as human as possible and lack in the things that humans would take for granted. For example, something as simple as a name, giving an identity, something the reader takes for granted but the monster so desperately wishes to have. The first time we hear the monster speak articulately is when I think the reader’s sympathy begins to be provoked. We have previously only heard of his hideous form from Frankenstein, his prime enemy. Frankenstein’s instant dislike to the creature once his creation is finished, is a shock to the reader as he previously describe it as ‘Beautiful!’ with such enthusiasm and excitement. His hatred for the monster could easily sway the reader to feel the same way as we have gained trust in Victor’s narration. Despite this we have not yet heard the creature’s voice and are simply making a judgement on his appearance. This presents the question of who really is the monster. Human nature for being so judgemental and corrupt, or the creature because of his huge form and frustration. In the first Volume Mary Shelley then

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  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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In What Ways Is The Creation Episode In Frankenstein Important?

Beulah-Rose Priddy 2 THA In what ways is the Creation episode in Frankenstein important The Creation episode is naturally narrated solely by Frankenstein and describes the zenith of all of Frankenstein’s work, the “Immaculate conception” of the “Creature” and ironically his revolted reaction to his handiwork. The episode gives insight into the nature of the natural order within the novel as well as into the workings of Frankenstein’s mind. The creation episode in Frankenstein is important because it profoundly emphasises how imprudent one would be to toy with nature. Frankenstein in all his blinded exuberance does not realise till much later that his desire to circumvent the female body as the source of life only boomerangs and instigates some very calamitous tribulations for him. Moreover his appalled and deleterious response to his actions act as symptoms to others who may want to overextend into the scientific field. Within the creation episode there is a resilient contrast : between Frankenstein’s self- inflated view of himself and what he actually is like. There is a period in time when Frankenstein speaks of the “power in his hand” and refers to himself as a “creator”, in describing himself so highly Frankenstein himself inadvertently shows just how supercilious he is. “ I doubted not that I should ultimately succeed” shows how confident

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  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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To what extent can the reader sympathise with the creature in Frankenstein?

To what extent can the reader sympathise with the creature in Frankenstein? The cruel and heartlessness of monsters are often used in Gothic fiction to create a feeling of horror and terror in the reader. In Frankenstein, Shelley takes the creature further than this by providing him with human qualities making him more abhuman. Sympathy is created for the creature by centring him as the victim of the novel as he is rejected by his creator and society making him relatable to the reader and provoking pity. However the creature’s monstrous turn in using violent behaviour, and initial bias already set up by Victor’s descriptions make it difficult for the reader to sympathise with him. Shelley directs sympathy to the creature by placing him as the victim of the novel. Victor takes on the role of a typical Gothic monstrous mother by rejecting his creature at ‘birth’. Upon seeing his creature Victor sees it as a ‘catastrophe’ to have ‘miserably given life’ and instantly flees. Shelley emphasises the feeling of rejection the creature felt by his intertextual reference to Adam in Paradise Lost, saying ‘I remembered Adam’s supplication to his Creator. But where was mine?’, it demonstrates to the reader how the abandonment of Victor has not only hurt the creature but left him confused which provokes the readers sympathies. Throughout the novel the creature is

  • Word count: 742
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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