• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Streetcar Named Desire may be considered as much about being American and America, as about Blanche and Stanley. Consider this view with reference to at least one other text.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Streetcar Named Desire may be considered as much about being American and America, as about Blanche and Stanley. Consider this view with reference to at least one other text. Streetcar Named Desire is very much about both Blanche and Stanley, and Being American and America. Tennessee Williams shows us this by interrelating the two topics throughout the book. Williams raises important issues about what makes an American an American. He suggests that there is a divide that once existed, but has now crumbled and left a few people behind, such as Blanche. However he sets the play in a transitional stage, with the future of America being gown within Stella, her baby the representative of the America to be. The period of the play is one in which backgrounds and class structure means very little; America is now a land of equals. This leaves a rather large downfall for all those who live on the pride of their ancestry. This is part of Blanche's failure within this world, she very much prides herself on her heritage "Our first American ancestors were French Huguenots" Tennessee Williams shows us here that Blanche is very much part of Old America, and unlike her sister Stella, she is unable to change with the times. ...read more.

Middle

Financially, she is in a worse state than he, for she has had to turn to prostitution to make ends meet, and has even been forced to give that up. It is almost as if she has been unwilling to accept the change, and clings on to Old America as it slowly sinks. In comparison, we see Stella, who has effectively made the change from aristocracy to meritocracy and has begun to form the future of America with Stanley. She has realised the Dubois name means little in this world, either financially or status, and has left it behind in marring into the Kowalskis. Blanche appears to slowly destroy herself through the book. Her attitude is still very aristocratic, and she seems to be unable to get away from this. Within the great melting pot that she has been forced into she still suggests a sense of r****m. She refers to Stanley as a polack, and when talking about her time back in Belle Reve she mentions the maid "....couldn't we have got a coloured girl to do it?" ...read more.

Conclusion

within an environment that is unrelenting and unforgiving. His ideals are very much in the past, just like Blanche. Blanche feels unhappy that she is the last in the line for the Dubois family and that her family's legacy will soon be no more, and w***y struggles to deal with the fact that his sons have not reached the greatness he had strived for them to. He has been let down by the dream, as the New America has taken over. This is also shown with his house, enclosed by the modernisation of blocks of buildings of New America, leaving his little house (his last remaining element of Old America) blocked from view, of what can arguably be called, life. We often see the characters, similarly drift off into their own word of their pasts. w***y sees Uncle Ben and his boys when they were younger (in the good old days), and Blanche continuously hears the Varsuviana and towards the end imagines an old fling form the past coming back. They both fail to accept the reality in which they live and both end up in tragedy, with Blanche being committed and w***y taking his own life with no end gain. They both become victims of the failed American Dream. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level A Street Car Named Desire section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level A Street Car Named Desire essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    How much is Desire a force for destruction in the play 'A Streetcar Named ...

    3 star(s)

    Desire, even when it is more moral, still proves itself a veritable force of destruction. There is also the symbolic use of the streetcar called 'Desire' which delivered Blanche at the start of the play. Blanche has already been affected by the destruction of desire, but by moving (however temporarily),

  2. Marked by a teacher

    Many definitions of tragedy claim that at the end of the play positives have ...

    3 star(s)

    of her past, her alcoholism and her treatment at the hands of Stanley Kowalski. Blanche's final words summarise her own tragic flaw; dependence, on strangers, on men, on alcohol, on anything but herself. The flaw, it could be argued landed her in such a tragic position.

  1. How far do the Kowalskis and the DuBois different notions lead to a tragic ...

    The opening scene of the Poker night immediately captures our attention with significant visual elements such as light and bold primary colours showing the harsh masculinity of the men and how 'they are at the peak of their manhood'. His dominating colours are contrasted with Blanche's whites and pastels that create her 'delicate beauty'.

  2. A Streetcar Named Desire - scenes 2 and 3 reviewed.

    * Stella; 'Shhhh! Be still, Stanley!'- She is still defending Blanche- she does not like what he is implying. * Stanley; 'What's rhinestone?'- he is so dumb!!! * Stanley; 'I have an acquaintance that works in a jewellery store.' He always has an acquaintance, shady character.

  1. A streetcar named desire - Exploration notes context/structure/language/plot&subplot/visual aural spatial.

    We can also see tragedy behind these fallacies she creates. > 'Don't you just love these long rainy afternoons in New Orleans when an hour isn't just an hour - but a little bit of eternity dropped in your hands - and who knows what to do with it?'

  2. A Steercar Named Desire - Blanche's Psychological Breakdown.

    Already in New Orleans, once she meets Stanley, Blanche is driven to get out of the house. She needs get away from Stanley for she feels that a Kowalski and a DuBois cannot coexist in the same household. Her only resort to get out, though, is Mitch.

  1. What dramatic techniques and devices does Williams deploy in order to depict the different ...

    The characters seem to turn to bathing to get rid of sins as Stanley also showers after he beats Stella. He believes the shower will get rid of his violent temper and in some way it does. After leaving the shower he feels remorseful for what he has done.

  2. Form and Structure of ‘ A Streetcar Named Desire’.

    This literally shows the antagonist up against the protagonist. This is the moment, where Blanche 'loses' power over Stanley. In the previous scenes, Blanche used her intelligence successfully to dominate Stanley, at the end of scene10, Blanche 'let's her guard down'.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work