• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Fighting Talk - Compare and contrast the three newspaper articles, explaining carefully what you like and dislike about them.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Fighting Talk Compare and contrast the three newspaper articles, explaining carefully what you like and dislike about them. by John East There is a large range of daily newspapers available across the country, aimed at a variety of different audiences. Roughly, these papers can be divided into two general categories - broadsheets and tabloids. Broadsheet describes the large pages of newspapers such as 'The Times' or 'Independent'. On the other-hand, the tabloid is the 'small, condensed, sensational newspaper', such as 'The Sun'. The newspapers, and the broadsheets in particular, can also be divided into different political camps. For example, 'The Daily Telegraph' is largely conservative, and has been nicknamed as 'The Daily Tory-graph'. Broadsheets are considered to be the more reliable of the two, presenting the facts as they are and the information unbiased. The tabloids, however, give brief, opinionated news stories that are printed alongside celebrity gossip. As a result, the tabloids have a lower reading age than the broadsheets. The three newspapers from which these articles are taken are 'The Star, 'The Guardian' and 'The Daily Mail'. 'The Guardian' is a liberal broadsheet, aimed at younger, executive people. 'The Star' and 'The Daily Mail' are both tabloids; however, 'The Daily Mail' has tendencies towards the spheres of the broadsheets, with more complex articles and stories, and has a slightly rightwing political stand. ...read more.

Middle

The opening paragraph, indeed, is a metaphor (relating to the headline BRUNO LEFT IN A WASTELAND), and the opening line is a simile 'Frank Bruno was like an intrepid explorer trekking the icy waste'. The reporter continues in this vein, describing losing the fight as slipping 'into a crevasse'. The media compares him to an 'intrepid explorer' because an explorer pursues victory for the sake of glory for his country; in a similar way Bruno's bid for the title 'raised the hopes of thousands'. In a different way, 'The Star' also compares Bruno to something else. Although the evidence is unreliable, the writer of BRAVE BRUNO FALLS maintains that the theme from The Greatest Story Ever Told was being played in Bruno's dressing room after his defeat. This would imply to a reader of 'The Star' that Bruno was as great as Muhammad Ali, but also that all great heroes will peak, and then fall from grace at the end of their life. It seems, to Bruno, that this is the end of his life as a boxer. All three of these articles adopt a similar attitude to Bruno - they are proud of him, and do not think of him as a failure. 'The Star' hero-worships the boxer, indeed, it seems that the whole article is devoted to appraisal for the loser. ...read more.

Conclusion

'The Guardian' reveals that there were no press present in Bruno's dressing room, but the writer for 'The Star' makes out that he was present, comforting Frank Bruno, whilst listening to melancholy music and offering advice. As a piece of sports commentary, BRUNO LEFT IN A WASTELAND is very well structured, providing perfectly the right balance of straight facts and description of the men and their conflict. Beginning with a metaphoric simile also sets the article apart from the others, which are more straightforward. It also includes a rather more reliable quote from Witherspoon, which suggests that this reporter had good access backstage. FANS HAIL BRUNO AS TITLE BID FAILS, the third and final article, is a combined mixture of the previous two. It does not contain all the traits of the tabloid, but neither is it highbrow enough to be a broadsheet article. The reporter is clearly a very knowledgeable person when it comes to boxing, but it does mean that the writing becomes a little stilted and dull to read. The description of the fight, though detailed, does have the feeling of reading a shopping list. Collectively, these articles provide good contrast with one another, and an interesting insight into the different styles of newspapers and articles. Nevertheless, they were not the most thrilling read of all time. - John East, Sunday February 22, 2004 John East Page 1 5/7/2007 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Newspapers & Magazines section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Newspapers & Magazines essays

  1. Comparing two newspaper articles, one from a tabloid and one from a broadsheet will ...

    Hate is displayed by showing the kidnapper as an animal when it uses the phrase 'catch the beast'. It also shows the kidnapper as a violent person by saying that he 'snatched' Sarah Payne. To make the first sentence affective, 'The Sun' has rhymed snatch and catch in one sentence.

  2. A Comparison OF Newspaper Articles- Four Editorials

    Unlike the other articles it gives us a clearer picture of what the article is about because it is the only one that mentions the adverb 'Boxing' The Sun, Daily Star, and the socialist worker, context are less detail, they have short simple facts about the fight and so therefore is aimed at a very broad audience.

  1. Compare and contrast the two newspaper articles: Consider the way each handles the subject ...

    The tabloid uses 'post code lottery' which is a very harsh anger raising way of putting the situation because when the word lottery is mentioned you think it is a remote chance that you can receive the help needed. In the broadsheet it is less rationally put because it only

  2. Compare and contrast the three newspaper articles, explaining carefully what you like and dislike ...

    The Guardian also ends on a high note. This is the person that has just beaten Bruno saying that he could come back. This is a good point for all fans of frank Bruno. The Daily Mail finishes by giving details about the end of the fight. It tells us how Frank Bruno's manager, Terry Lawless, threw in the towel.

  1. My two articles I have chosen to compare are from the The Sun and ...

    Further more, the sentence is short and simple. There is a low level of technical jargon like 'eliminated' and 'distributed'. Lastly, emotive language is frequently used in tabloids through words such as 'beast', 'snatched', 'hunting', 'nail', 'loves', 'boosted', 'vanished' and other similar words produce emotional feelings. On the contrary, broadsheets are there to inform than to provoke emotions and so will use detail in their text.

  2. I have decided to compare two newspaper articles, one from the tabloid "The Daily ...

    hundreds injured, despite Saudi attempts to prevent stampedes that have plagued the annual event." This single complex sentence forces the reader to endure a brief but informative sentence about the incident and then makes them want to read further as it shows the article will contain useful knowledge of the

  1. Compare and contrast the treatment of the killings at DunblanePrimary school by The Sun ...

    However in another sense they did not take the overpowering sadness of the parents and relatives in to consideration because they used photos that exploited the children's innocence and happiness (the class P1 photo that showed them smiling and looking very happy like angels)

  2. The two articles we have looked at for analysis have a common theme - ...

    This has connotations of distress and remorse. In the picture, she appears to have eye make-up on to draw attention away from the rest of her face. The blank background seems to be a window, which she is leaning against and looking out of.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work