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In this experiment I aim to find a value for the Young's Modulus of a piece of cassette tape. Young's Modulus is a way of expressing how much a certain material is stretched or compressed.

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Introduction

Physics A-S level Coursework                Matthew Lloyd

Young’s Modulus Investigation

A.

In this experiment I aim to find a value for the Young’s Modulus of a piece of cassette tape. Young’s Modulus is a way of expressing how much a certain material is stretched or compressed. For the same material the Young’s Modulus is always the same, this can be explained by looking at the way in which we calculate it.

Young’s Modulus = Stress  ÷ Strain

The amount of stress exerted on a material can be calculated by: -

Force ÷ Area

Strain is calculated by: -

Extension ÷ Original length

To find the Young’s Modulus of the cassette tape, I will attach certain weights to the end of the tape and measure the extension caused by each weight. I will also have to determine the cross sectional area and the length of the tape before I attach any weights to the cassette tape.

...read more.

Middle

  1. Measure width and depth of the cassette tape in order to find the cross-sectional area.
  2. Add weight holder to tape and measure the original length.
  3. Add a 50g weight and then measure the extension .
  4. Measure the reading from part 3 twice more.
  5. Repeat step three and four only adding an additional 50.00g each time until reaching 500.00g total.
  6. Gather results into a table so they can be easily compared.
  7. From the readings, plot a graph of force x extension.
  8. Find the gradient of the graph and use it to find the Young’s Modulus for the tape, by using the below formula: -

Young’s Modulus = Gradient x lengthimage06.png

                                Area

There are many externalities, which could affect the results from this experiment. The length of the tape, temperature of the room, cross sectional area of tape, material that the tape is made from and even the pressure in the room, are all factors that may distort my findings. Some of these factors however will have little if not no effect on my results, so I will class them as being constant.

...read more.

Conclusion

>There are a few areas I need to be aware of errors and in some cases take precaution with. Here is a list of the main areas in which errors can occur in my experiment: -
  • Measuring the Depth of the tape.
  • Measuring the width of the tape.
  • The actual weight of the weights used.
  • Measuring the extension of the tape.

Results

Force (N)

Length (cm)

Extension (cm)

Reading 1

Extension

(cm)

Reading 2

Extension

(cm)

Reading 3

0

77.10

0

0

0

0.49

77.40

0.30

0.30

0.30

1.00

77.60

0.50

0.50

0.50

1.49

77.70

0.60

0.60

0.60

1.99

77.90

0.80

0.80

0.80

2.49

78.00

0.90

0.90

0.90

2.97

78.40

1.30

1.30

1.30

3.47

78.60

1.50

1.50

1.50

3.97

79.00

1.90

1.90

1.90

4.46

79.20

2.10

2.10

2.10

4.96

79.50

2.40

2.40

2.40

...read more.

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