A midsummers nights dream Act 3 Scene 1

Explain how you would communicate the roles of the main characters and give examples from Act 3 scene 1. In this scene the mechanicals are in a forest rehearsing for the play for The King and Queens wedding. We see that the mechanicals are obsessed with keeping in line with the realism of the play which could be connected to the overall theme of the play: the contrasts of realism and imagination, between the magical world and the human world. In this scene the character Peter Quince, gets caught up in the minute details of the play and as the theatrical organiser, does his best to keep the "bully" Bottom under control. Since peter Quince seems to be the head of the acting group, I would say that he would be more upper class than the rest. Translating this to the way in which he would walk, speak and re-act. Quince would speak with a slight accent to show his upper side roots and he would have a soft tone, to emphasis bottoms electrifying personality as he tends to interrupt and speak over people. But when the Bottom pronounces a word wrong, Quince would erupt and in a firm and also nervous tone correct him. At this point we see Quince almost having a nervous break down as he gets caught up in the minute details of the script, to show this I would shake all over and use precise hand movements at the script. Quince at all times would have a worried or stressed look on his

  • Word count: 801
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Drama
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Discussing The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark by William Shakespeare.

Jessy McMahon CU Senior English 2 21 Oct. 2008 Hamlet Dialect Essay It is understood that in The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark by William Shakespeare; Hamlet, in his famous soliloquy in scene one of act three ("To be or not to be..."), is considering suicide. Hamlet in actuality is only questioning the thoughts of death and in turn has no real intent on actually committing suicide, this can be inferred by the observations made in the soliloquy. Many of the statements that Hamlet say through the text, draws people to the conclusion that Hamlet is suicidal. The reason why Hamlet is not contemplating suicide, is that he makes the overall decision that it is not gods will and he would not go to heaven and that death is not a proper way out of the hardships in life. Hamlet is also in truth thinking whether or not to act on the ghosts' directions to get revenge on Claudius or not. It seems as though Hamlet is considering suicide when he uses the words in the expression, "To be or not to be" (3.1.56) inferred by several as whether to live or not to live. This in turn creates the tone for the rest of the soliloquy to be all about Hamlets existence and meaning to life. Hamlet also speaks of death in which he relates to sleep, "To die, to sleep," (3.1.64), he then contemplates what really happens during sleep and what might occur in 'eternal sleep', "...To sleep, perchance

  • Word count: 799
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Drama
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Shakespeare.

Shakespeare was born in Stratford-Upon-Avon on April 23rd, 1564. John Shakespeare, William's father, was a Glover and a Whittaker. He was a highly successful and respected man of high status. His father held many public official positions: mayor, town council man, and justice of peace. Shakespeare's father could not write. In 1576, John's business went down. He stopped attending meetings and social events. Shakespeare was twelve at this time. Shakespeare's mother was Mary Arden. She came from a wealthy family who paid a handsome dowry to marry her off. While living on Henley Street, she had eight children with the Shakespeare name. Shakespeare went to Stratford Grammar School where he studied classics written in Greek and Latin. His teachers gave him the incentive to read. He was taught by two Oxford graduates, Simon Hunt and Thomas Jenkins. Shakespeare had an unusual keen observation of both nature and mankind. His education was said to have ended here. On November 27, 1582, Shakespeare married Ann Hathaway who was twenty-eight years old. On May 26, 1583, Ann bore their first daughter, Susanna. In 1585, a set of twins were born, Judith and Hamlet. Hamlet died at the age of eleven in 1596. No evidence was found of Shakespeare between the years of 1585-1592. These years of Shakespeare's life were called "The Hidden Years". During Shakespeare's Hidden Years, many people

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Drama
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Shakespeare Biography

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE: A BIOGRAPHICAL SUMMARY William Shakespeare, surely the world's most performed and admired playwright, was born in April, 1564 in Stratford-upon-Avon, in Warwickshire, about 100 miles northwest of London. According to the records of Stratford's Holy Trinity Church, he was baptized on April 26. Since it was customary to baptize infants within days of birth, and since Shakespeare died 52 years later on April 23, and -- most significantly -- since April 23 is St. George's day, the patron saint of England, it has become traditional to assign the birth day of England's most famous poet to April 23. But as is the case with most sixteenth century births, the actual day is not recorded, so we cannot be absolutely sure. Shakespeare's parents were John and Mary Shakespeare, who lived in Henley Street, Stratford. John, the son of Richard Shakespeare, was a whittawer (a maker, worker and seller of leather goods such as purses, belts and gloves) and a dealer in agricultural produce. He was a solid, middle class citizen at the time of William's birth, and a man on the rise. He served in Stratford government successively as a member of the Council (1557), constable (1558), chamberlain (1561), alderman (1565) and finally high bailiff (1568), the equivalent of town mayor. At around about 1577 John Shakespeare's fortunes began to decline for unknown

  • Word count: 769
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Drama
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Are we meant only to laugh at Bottom in A Midsummer Night's Dream, or does he express some more serious wisdom?

Terence Landman Drama Exercise Student Number: A Midsummer Night's Dream 605L2621 Friday 12 August Are we meant only to laugh at Bottom in A Midsummer Night's Dream, or does he express some more serious wisdom? In this exercise there will be an in depth analysis of Bottom the weaver and to what extent his folly may morph into wisdom of various sorts. This exercise will attempt to describe how Bottom is both foolish and wise (wise in his foolishness and foolish in his wisdom). The exercise will also analyse the parody found within the texts spoken by Bottom and that of Corinthians and the possible implications it might have on the level of wisdom to which Bottom can be judged. Bottom's monologue in act 4.1.211 line 205- 207 states the following: " The eye of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen, man's hand is not able to taste, his tongue to conceive, nor his heart to report what my dream was!" If we compare this to the King James version (1611) of 1 Corinthians 2: 9-10 we can see, to a large extent, that they are extremely similar and is indeed a parody: "Eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, neither have entered into the heart of man the things which God hath prepared for them that love him. But God hath revealed them unto us by his spirit: for the spirit searches all things, yea, the deep things of God" The Geneva Bible (1557) however

  • Word count: 736
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Drama
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The Globe

The Globe It was a hot summer day in 1602. I was only a young boy that didn´t know much of the world, but I had dreams. One of these dreams was to see a play at The Globe. The Globe was a wooden structure in the heart of London right next to the Thames. We lived pretty close, so every time a play was set up I could hear the audience cheer. Of course, if the play was bad they would boo, but that didn´t happen very often. This particular day the show "Hamlet" was to be preformed for the first time. The rumours said that this play was going to be something very special. It was written by a man called Shakespeare. I didn´t know much about him, but i had heard that he wrote incredible plays. I couldn´t afford a ticket but I couldn´t resist going there anyway; I just wanted to hear the cheers and be able to taste the atmosphere. As I stood among the people who were fortunate enough to own a ticket, I saw the guard having a quarrel with an intoxicated man. I saw my chance and thought like all brave and mad people; "You only live once". I ran past the guard and through the gates. I passed through the wooden exterior, filled with excitement, into the actual theater. Must have been my lucky day since the guard didn´t saw me, or at least he pretended that he didn´t. I came out in the middle of the globe. When I looked around me all I could see was people with smiles on their

  • Word count: 712
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Drama
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Sonnet 2 Analysis

The sonnets by Shakespeare convince a young, handsome friend of Shakespeare's to have children to forever keep his beauty alive. However this changes after a number of sonnets. Shakespeare stresses that this beauty will not last, and that it is selfish and foolish for him not to prepare for the loss of his beauty and youth. The only way he can truly prepare is to rear a child so that his son can carry on his name and all his wonderful qualities, including his unsurpassed beauty. Shakespeare has made it very clear to show his opinion about his friend greediness and not sharing his beauty with the world. The usage of language techniques are used to show his inner thoughts about his friend's actions. Sonnet number 2 is another poem of Shakespeare's in which he tries to convince his friend. At the start of the poem it starts of and describes the effects of time to his friend's beauty. This is unusual as he usually describes his friend's beauty and compares it to something else. From line 1-9 Shakespeare describes the damage time could do to his beauty. Line 1 describes as "forty winters" pass and then in line 2 there will be "deep trenches in thy beauty's field" meaning wrinkles on his face. Wrinkles will wreck his friend's beauty and time will form the wrinkles. In lines 3 and 4 Shakespeare tells us that look at the beautiful face while it lasts, when it's young, but

  • Word count: 710
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Drama
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“Look again at ‘Shall I Compare Thee….?’ By William Shakespeare, compare this poem with one other of your choice”

Stephen Kent 17/5/02 "Look again at 'Shall I Compare Thee....?' By William Shakespeare, compare this poem with one other of your choice" In this essay I will be comparing "Shall I Compare Thee...?", and "The Flea", by John Donne. These two poets both have the same ambition; they are trying to get a woman. Shakespeare is trying to earn the women's love and respect, while Donne is just trying to get the women into bed. The main difference between these two poems is that "Shall I Compare Thee...?", is a love poem and "The Flea", is not. William Shakespeare wrote more than 150 sonnets, one of them being "Shall I Compare Thee...?". This poem is very rhythmic giving it a sort of a love poem feeling. This poem is rhythmic because it has a good Iambic Pentameter. Shakespeare compares the women to a "summers day". The first line of the poem "shall I compare thee to a summers day" is a rhetorical question. This poem is split into four parts, in the first part Shakespeare is asking questions and answering them himself. In the second line he is starting to say, "Thou art more lovely and more temperate", I think Shakespeare is saying in the first part really there is now comparison, she is too beautiful and wonderful. Shakespeare used a lot better known loving imagery such as heaven, summers day, darling

  • Word count: 594
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Drama
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Shakespeare bullet point notes

* The average Shakespeare play had 30,000 words in it - more than the average person could need in their lifetime. He invented 1,700 new words - he turned verbs into nouns and nouns into verbs. * 100 years earlier Chaucer was writing the Canterbury Tales in English, while the upper classes spoke French and Latin. * Caxton invented the printing press in 1470. * Shakespeare wrote about foreign places a lot, but he was only transported by his imagination. E.g. in the entire Merchant of Venice he never mentions it's built over water. * Language in Shakespeare's plays is a mixture of vulgar and sophisticated. In 1592 he was said to have been stealing others' works. * Shakespeare and Marlowe were born in the same year. Marlowe went to University at Cambridge, Shakespeare didn't - however he was an actor and Marlowe wasn't, so Shakespeare had the advantage of knowing what it would be like for an actor delivering these lines. But, Marlowe is the only playwright who can match him. * Shakespeare NEVER invents any new plots. * The "Chronicle of England, Scotland and Wales" of 1587 is a source of many events in a lot of his plays, e.g. King Lear. * There is a rhythm in Shakespeare - the "iambic pentameter". When he wanted to make the audience feel uneasy he reverses the rhythm, e.g. in Macbeth. * When the plague arrived in London all the theatres closed down by law, so

  • Word count: 556
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Drama
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William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare's father, John Shakespeare, moved to the town of Stratford-upon-Avon in the mid- sixteenth century, here ha became a successful landowner, moneylender, wool and glover. In 1557 he married Mary Arden. The town records indicate that William Shakespeare was John and Mary's third child. He was born on the 23rd April 1564, he had several sisters and at least one brother. Shakespeare grew up in the Tudor market town of Stratford-on-Avon, a lovely village surrounded by extensive, unspoiled woods. His father, John Shakespeare, served as a burgess on the local municipal council, and it was because of his father's status as a town official that Shakespeare was able to attend Stratford Grammar School. When William Shakespeare was eighteen years of age he was married to Anne Hathaway, while she was twenty-six years old. The first of their children, Susanna, was born six months after the marriage and was, therefore, conceived out of wedlock. In conjunction with the substantial age difference between Shakespeare and his mature bride, it is often suggested that the future playwright married Anne Hathaway because he had gotten her pregnant, that he was, in fact, forced into a marriage with this older woman. After Susanna's marriage, William and Anne had two more children, the twins Hamnet and Judith. Shakespeare spent a great deal of his time with his family in

  • Word count: 550
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Drama
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