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A Dolls House- Act 1 and Act 2

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Introduction

A Doll’s House- Act 1 and Act 2 1. In the play, “Doll’s House” by Henrik Ibsen, portrays the protagonist, Nora as a very child-like character who understands a man’s world better than she will let on. She is treated very similarly to a doll; she is played with and treated like a child. Her husband Torvald Helmer does not believe that Nora understands the world of money and business. Nora doesn’t let on that she does, and she plays along to this façade of being someone with no knowledge on the outside world. It is evident that she is aware of the world of business when she says “” In business, you know things called quarterly payment and …. I couldn’t save much out of the housekeeping money” (Ibsen, 161). From this quote, it is evident that Nora is very much aware of the borrowing system in the business world. She understands the system of borrowing money, and paying it back in quarterly payments. By her knowing this information, it is clear that Nora is not just the puppet of Torvald, but an intelligent woman who is informed of the world’s events. Furthermore, Nora proves that she knows about the world of men by saying, “Last winter I was lucky enough to get a lot of copying to do, so I locked myself in and st writing-often till after midnight. ...read more.

Middle

Nora suggests that they can borrow money, and when Torvald warned that the people they borrowed from will come looking for them, Nora said ? Them? Who bothers about them? They?re just strangers? (Ibsen, 149). In reply to this, Torvald had said, ?Nora, Nora! Just like a woman? (Ibsen, 149)! This demonstrates Nora?s acting skills as a typical woman. She doesn?t let on that she is aware of the matters in a man?s world. She explains the importance of her playing this role of the innocent, helpless wife when she tells Kristina, ?Besides, Torvald has his pride-most men have- he?d be terribly hurt and humiliated if he thought he owed anything to me. It?d spoil everything between us, and our lovely happy home would never be the same again? (Ibsen, 161). From this, it is evident that Nora only puts up with this act just to please her husband. She does not show her true, intelligent colours to her husband, but acts as the damsel in distress wife that he wishes her to be. In conclusion, Nora merely pretends to be a doll-like character in front of her husband. In reality, she is a very intelligent, well-informed woman who has a lot of knowledge on the business world, but never shows that she does to her husband. ...read more.

Conclusion

I must just tell you one thing, though. Do you know we?ve just had the most wonderful stroke of luck- only the other day? (Ibsen, 155). In this, Nora first says that she will listen to Mrs. Linde, but then she ignores that and carries on with her life story. Nora was too excited and happy that she just told Mrs. Linde about the new bank manager post, being inconsiderate to her feelings. She was being too hyper and peppy that she could no longer hold that piece of information within herself. This further demonstrates Nora?s childlikeness. Since Nora receives everything she desires, and is treated similar to a pet, she acts very childlike for a grown woman. Compared to Mrs. Linde, Nora has not faced many tragedies. Nora did have to save her husband?s life, yet she is so subtle about it. She does not use this as an advantage and become arrogant like Mrs. Linde. Instead, she hides the fact that she too has worked hard for someone else, and pretends to be childish instead. Mrs. Linde has openly faced many challenges, and overcome them, which made her haughty. On the other hand, Nora is seen to have not faced many problems; however she has secretly overcome many challenges. She hides this and acts childish, proving that she is humble. In summary, it can be said that the different experiences of the world one has, shapes the personality of oneself. ...read more.

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