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Anger and Violence Portrayed in Of Mice and Men.

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Introduction

Anger and Violence Portrayed in Of Mice and Men In Steinbecks Novel of Mice and Men, anger and violence is a common occurance. Anger either envoked by fear , jealousy or anxiety. Lennie is always the source of this anger, whether it be toward him , because of him , or from him. All anger revolves around him. One of the first characters to portray anger in this Novel is George, Lennies partner. From very early on anger is being shown towards Lennie. Georges anger is at the fact Lennie wants something that they do not have, yet because it is Lennie who is asking, they are expected to have it. This is probably due to the innocence of Lennie. George tells him "Well we aint got no ketchup!", his anger is clearly envoked out of frustration, as he goes on to talk about how he could do "Whatever the h**l " he liked if Lennie wasn't around. ...read more.

Middle

Lennie is punched by Curley because Curley thought Lennie was laughing at him, when infact he was laughing at the thought of tending the rabbits on a little plot o land him and George where gonna get. Yet again Lennie is persecuted for his innocence. Perhaps not only for the fact that Lennie was laughing, but "Curley hates big guys, being a little guy". Ever since George and Lennie arrived on the ranch ,Curley has had a mean spot for Lennie. Curley likes to think he is the unspoken boss around the workers, and the arrival of a strong , very tall man is a threat almost to Curley. This could have been the bigger reason for Curley punching Lennie. The anger envoked by Lennie is almost because of jealousy in Curleys case, jealousy of not being as big and as strong as Lennie is. ...read more.

Conclusion

Crooks realises then the Lennie is not like normal people and quickly amends to clam him down, reassuring him that George will come back. Lennie straight away forgets the matter and resumes his dreams of "tending the rabbits". His innocence again is shown. Like a child who had its dummie taken away then given back to it he calms down straight away and resumes his passive mood. Unlike a child however he possesses great strength, perhaps a better analogy would be a grizzly bear who had its salmon stolen from it then returned. Throughout the story there is many , many instances of anger, but I have tried to keep the main instances. In conclusion, Lennie is often the cause and fuel of the characters anger, mostly indirectly. Lennie himself behaves like an animal would. He angers for aslong as he thinks he is going to lose something, but asoon as he is reassured his anger dissipates completely. By Kerry Byrne ...read more.

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3 star(s)

An interesting title that allows for interesting analysis of the text; in this case analysis needs to be developed in further detail, in particular interpretation of language and structure.
I would like to have seen further exploration of Lennie's anger and its effects - the crushing of Curley's hand and the killing of Curley's wife. These would have been interesting points as Lennie's angry reactions in both of these instances contrast with his normally very calm demeanor.

3 Stars

Marked by teacher Laura Gater 20/05/2013

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