• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Animal Farm - analysis of Satire

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Animal Farm The main purpose of satire is to attack, and intensely criticise the target subject. This is superbly carried out in the classic piece of satire, Animal Farm. The main targets at the brunt of this political satire are the society that was created in Russia after the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917, and the leaders involved in it. George Orwell successfully condemns these targets through satirical techniques such as irony, fable, and allegory. The immediate object of attack in Orwell's political satire is the society that was created in Russia after the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. The events narrated in Animal Farm obviously and continuously refer to events in another story, the history of the Russian Revolution. In other words, Animal Farm is not only a charming fable (A Fairy Story, as Orwell playfully subtitles it) and a bitter political satire; it is also an allegory. The main target of this allegory is Stalin, represented by Napoleon the pig. He represents the human frailties of any revolution. Orwell believed that although socialism is a good ideal, it could never be successfully adopted due to uncontrollable sins of human nature. ...read more.

Middle

A fable is a story, usually having a moral - in which beasts talk and act like men and women. Orwell's characters are both animal and human. The pigs, for example eat mash - real pig food - but with milk in it that they have grabbed and persuaded the other animals to let them keep (a human action). The dogs growl and bite the way real dogs do--but to support Napoleon's drive for political power. Orwell never forgets this delicate balance between how real animals actually behave and what human qualities his animals are supposed to represent. Let's just say Orwell hadn't used the technique of storytelling, and had painted an objective picture of the evils he describes. The real picture would probably be very depressing and extremely boring. So instead, he offers us a travesty of the situation. The primary reason for this abstraction was to move readers from the concrete reality. So whilst entertaining us through a fantastic setting, he provides us reader with a critical vision towards his targets. It is written for entertainment, but contains sharp and telling comments on the Russian revolution and it's leaders, offering `imaginary gardens with real toads in them'. ...read more.

Conclusion

You are expecting the story to be like every other fable you've read. Complete with cute characters, predictable plotline, and happy ending. But because of the nature of the content in Animal farm, the content is completely incongruent to the style. Another irony that occurs in Animal Farm is when pig becomes man. In that Old Major at the beginning assumes that man is the only enemy of the animals. He emphasises that animals must never imitate man, especially his vices. Gradually in their life-style and their indifference to the animals, the pigs exploit the animals much more than Jones ever did. This irony particularly depicts how low the pigs had actually become, and how Stalin had made things much worse than it had originally been under the Czar's rule. This further enhances the satirical aim of condemning the target. Through satirical techniques such as irony, fable, and allegory, George Orwell paints a vivid picture of the evils in Stalinist Russia in his book Animal Farm. He is very effective in doing so and condemns his targets through every thread of his book including the characters, the themes, and even the style. He does so simply, yet poignantly, and is very successful in achieving the satirical aim of condemning his targets. ?? ?? ?? ?? Waseem Hussain 11A English ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Animal Farm section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Animal Farm essays

  1. Compare and contrast the themes of revolution in Animal Farm by George Orwell and ...

    Then the Marquis rides onward. On the way to his chateau, he is stopped by a woman who wants a gravestone for her husband and a road-mender who says he saw a man swinging from the bottom of his carriage.

  2. Animal Farm.

    By the end of the novella, after Squealer's repeated reconfigurations of the Seven Commandments in order to decriminalize the pigs' treacheries, the main principle of the farm can be openly stated as "ALL ANIMALS ARE EQUAL, BUT SOME ANIMALS ARE MORE EQUAL THAN OTHERS."

  1. Animal Farm - Critical Analysis

    Each time that Napoleon and the other pigs wish to break one of the Seven Commandments, they legitimize their transgressions by changing the Commandment's original language. Whenever the farm suffers a setback, Napoleon blames Snowball's treachery - which the reader, of course, knows is untrue.

  2. An analysis of Eric Arthur Blairs writing

    Stalin's tyrannical rule and eventual neglect of the founding principles of the Russian Revolution are represented by the pigs' turn to violent government and the adoption of human traits and behaviors, the trappings of their original oppressors. Although Orwell believed strongly in socialist ideas, he felt that the Soviet Union realized these ideas in a terribly perverse form.

  1. Animal Farm: About the Author; Overview; Setting; Themes and Characters; Literary Technique; Historical and ...

    As a work by a relatively unknown author, the book received unusually high praise from critics, but it was commercially unsuccessful and Orwell found the experience disheartening. Undaunted, he earned his livelihood as a journalist while continuing to publish both fiction and non-fiction.

  2. 1984, and Animal Farm.

    This short novel was rejected twice, mainly on the grounds that it was only 35,000 words and used only a moderate part of all of the notes, journals and other things that he had collected and intended to use. In despair he asked a friend, Mabel Firez to "destroy the script, but save the paper clips."

  1. Animal Farm is a story of betrayal; a fable which uses animals to represent ...

    Napoleon continued to do this, until there was only one rule left: ?All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others? All the animals endure these disasters silently, until the ultimate betrayal. Boxer, (who represents all the dedicated but tricked communist supporters)

  2. Explore the ways that the writers use contrast within a character or between characters ...

    difficult and Snowball set up a school for them to learn how to read and write. Napoleon shows irony when he says that there will be a ?spontaneous demonstration?, this is irony as demonstrations take a long time to plan and they are never spontaneous.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work