• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6

Compare 'Macbeth and 'Romeo and Juliet' as tragedies - which do you find more effective?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Compare 'Macbeth and 'Romeo and Juliet' as tragedies - which do you find more effective? Intro Admirable qualities Fate and supernatural Tragic hero Tragic flaw combined with a certain set of circumstances Undeserved suffering Conclusion Aristotle suggests in his definition of a tragedy that the downfall and destruction of the protagonist and tragic hero is due to a character flaw combined with a certain set of circumstances which causes them to act a certain way. I will now examine to what extent the two plays comply with his theory. A tragic hero or heroine should have admirable qualities, which encourages the audience to pity them. Romeo and Juliet are likeable characters in the play, young and caught up in a web of love, which the audience may feel that they can relate to. The story line of 'Romeo and Juliet' is also very gripping. This is because of the fact that it is love at first sight and the play was made to build up sympathy in the audience, and during the course of 'Romeo and Juliet' the love between Romeo and Juliet is a hard situation for the both of them. Already at the start the families of Romeo and Juliet are ancient rivals and enemies, but if that wasn't hard enough Romeo was banished from Verona. Juliet is unable to visit him because her father, Lord Capulet, is possessive, and she has to ask for leave if she is to exit the Capulet household. In the days in which the play Romeo and Juliet was written by William Shakespeare different views where set on marriage and how people where treated. Her father treats Juliet throughout the play as a possession. Juliet is told exactly whom she is to consider marrying and she isn't expected to disagree with the choices made. Again this brings about sympathy, but even more sympathy in the modern day because in those days people accepted the ways that people were treated. ...read more.

Middle

We're all sort of like the puppets below the puppeteer. He's asking for that puppeteer to direct his "sail," or his life, in the right direction. Romeo and Juliet throughout the play have dreams or visions of their deaths. Juliet for example in 3.5.55, she says, "Methinks I see thee, now thou art so low, as one dead in the bottom of a tomb." She sees Romeo dead in a tomb, which is where he eventually ends up in the end of the play, beside her. This why she talks about Romeo being s o low in a tomb, he's dead, and she has foreseen it, before it has even happened. How could she have seen the future if it wasn't already decided for her? The answer is, she probably couldn't have. During this part of the play, after Romeo has killed Paris and himself but before Juliet has done the same, the Friar comes rushing in, trying to persuade Juliet out of the tomb before more arrive. He says to Juliet 5.3.159, "A greater power than we can contradict hath thwarted our intents." It can be interpreted that he is talking of fate, telling Juliet that a power beyond their control has spoiled their plans. This power must be fate. Nowadays, a tragic hero is a person who has a talent or skill, is a great character and has usually achieved something momentous. They also may have died tragically, often for mankind. Whichever way you look at him, Macbeth is contemptible, even if you think he was just an instrument of the witches, and unable to escape his fate. However, he often challenges fate, as he believes he leads a 'charmed life'. This is because he was told that 'none of woman born shall harm Macbeth' and that he cannot be vanquished until 'Great Birnam wood to high Dunsinane hill shall come'. Unfortunately for Macbeth though, Birnam wood does seem to move toward Dunsinane. ...read more.

Conclusion

In that case he is still loathsome because of the weakness he exhibits with Lady Macbeth and the unnecessary murders of Lady Macduff and all her household. Macbeth achieved nothing terribly momentous in his life, apart from his success as a soldier. But his latter behaviour ruins any favourable impression you might have formed of him. Macbeth did not die in tragic circumstances; he was killed by the husband and father of people he had murdered without a cause. He was defending his unlawful position as King against the claims of the true heir to the crown, and he died as he lived his life: selfishly and thoughtlessly, without putting right or seeming to regret any of the vile acts he has committed or the self-interested pain he has caused. 'Macbeth' fulfils my expectations of a Shakespearean tragedy as it follows all the factors given by Aristotle. 'Macbeth' leaves a feeling of catharsis in its audience as I felt upset by the events of the story yet was left with a feeling that it was for the better as evil had been defeated (Macbeth) and good had overcome it (Malcolm). Scotland was a happier place after Macbeth had been defeated. Order was restored and Malcolm brought harmony back to Scotland as he was rightfully king because he was the son of Duncan. I personally found 'Macbeth' quite a tragic story as there is a lot if suffering and many people are killed. 'Romeo and Juliet' has elements of tragedy. Young, innocent lovers die, through no fault of their own. The play does not show the common pattern of tragedy, a person of high rank falling to death. Instead it shows the deaths of two protagonists, young and hasty, caught in a web only partly of their own making. But if it were not for the sombre Prologue, Romeo and Juliet would seem very much a comedy until the unexpected, almost accidental death of Mercutio. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Romeo and Juliet section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Romeo and Juliet essays

  1. To what extent is Romeo a tragic hero?

    The prologue tells you that the play will end with death "a pair of star-crossed lovers take their lives". You also find out that the two families have been feuding for so many years, "from ancient grudge break new mutiny" that the love between the children of these families will find it hard to survive and it will end badly.

  2. To what extent did Shakespeare make us believe that the Friar was to blame ...

    his true feelings - if he is acting on impulse or if it is true love - "So soon forsaken? Young men's love then lies/ Not truly in their hearts, but in their eyes." In this way, the Friar does do the right thing and does seem to respond to

  1. How is Romeo and Juliet an effective tragedy?

    hinting on the impending tragedy, saying that, yes, there will be more trouble, and the price is death, or something close. The Prince states that banishment is a punishment for a fight. Banishment was considered to be a fate worse than death, and banishment plays an important part when the tragedy unfolds.

  2. didn't think I would ever fall in love, come to think of it I ...

    "Ok mum, anything else?" I asked with no patience at all "Yea, there's ten pounds in the draw I expect change and don't forget to lock the door" "Ok bye mum" and with that I hung up. d**n she's so annoying.

  1. Who is responsible for the deaths of Romeo and Juliet?Romeo and Juliet is one ...

    The marriage led to their deaths because they had to see each other in secret away from their parents and without them knowing and them being married is what made Romeo break the law and return after his banishment to see Juliet and made him commit suicide.

  2. Who or what is to blame for the tragedies in the final scene of ...

    Therefore, 'bumping' into Capulet's servant was the fateful coincidence that starts the tragedy. Romeo blames fate when he kills Tybalt, and there is also a warning that something bad is going to happen before he does this. The fore event is the weather drastically changes, and it becomes dark and gloomy.

  1. Shakespeare Coursework Macbeth and Romeo and Juliet DUNCAN, MERCUTIO AND TYBALT; A COMPARISON ...

    there is a battle in which Macbeth and Banquo are involved in. In this battle the King (Duncan) is betrayed by the Thane of Cawdor and sentences him to death. He then wishes to give the title to his bravest warrior who is Macbeth, but Macbeth does not know this.

  2. To what extent do you consider Friar Laurence to be responsible for the tragedy ...

    The irregularity develops when he is very quick to highlight the inconsistencies of Romeo's behaviour, yet he too acts irregularly. Furthermore, I think that this suggests he is quite a pompous man, who criticizes others and is ignorant as he fails to notice his own faults, and superciliously uses his wisdom.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work