Impact Alert

IMPACT ALERT- ASTEROIDS How successfully does the article "Impact alert- asteroids" persuade and warn the reader of the explosion of asteroids? The article "impact alert- asteroids" by Stuart Clark is written in the form of inform, explain, describe where the writer informs the world about a threat that is waiting to destroy the earth and explains and describes how and what would happen. He uses third person narration, involving all the adults and active participants of society to share this crisis together. The title creates the tone and mood of the article. The word "impact" relates to destruction, bringing about an alarming mood and the word "alert" creates a sense of urgency helping to grasp the reader's interest as the importance and risk of asteroids is highlighted. The writer presents details about asteroids, helping spread awareness about what these asteroids really are. The opening paragraph holds simple facts about asteroids, written in self explanatory language like "lump of rock", "they would weigh less than the moon" and "30,000 asteroid fragments fall on the earth every year". He also presents a couple of facts in between his explanation and description like "Tunguska was caused by an object no bigger than 100m in diameter", "they are the asteroids measuring about 1km across" which are an effective way of presenting his article. He doesn't just list down

  • Word count: 769
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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How do the pre-1914 poets accept or reject the stereotype of women in the era?

How do the pre-1914 poets accept or reject the stereotype of women in the era? Victorian women were stereotyped as weak timid and private however Victorian men were stereotyped totally different they were brave independent and public. In this essay I will discuss when the poets of the years prior to 1914 accepted the strereotype of women. I have studided many poems from this era including "First Love" by John Clare "Birthday" by Christina Rosetti, "How Do I Love Thee" by Elizabeth Barrett Browning, "Villegiature" by Edit Nesbit and "A Women To Her Love" by Christina Walsh. In the following pages I will discuss the pre 1940's acception and rejection of the sterotypes of women at the time in relation to Birthday, Villegiature How Do I Love Thee First Love & a Women To Her Lover. In the poem "Birthday" written by Rossetti by saying "my heart is like a rainbow shell" it makes me think she is accepting the stereotype of women as it is quoting she is shy also the author is accepting the stereotype as she is putting images that represents fertility. "Carve it in doves and pomegranates". Which means seeds meaning seeds make people fertile. Also when she says " raise me a dais of silk and down". Which means she would stay at home if she was raised properly. However she is not accepting the stereotype of women as she wrote the poem and women were not allowed to write in them days

  • Word count: 669
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Analysis of Poem 'Digging'

Analysis of the Poem 'Digging' The famous Seamus Heaney has yet again impressed us with his many meaningful and skillful poems. After having written the poem "Follower", which describes his childhood dream, he had written up "Digging", which explains the events that followed after. Digging is a metaphor for the work Heaney had done. When he was young, he was inspired to become a laborer like his father and grandfather, but then, things changed and he eventually became a writer. The last stanza: "Between my finger and my thumb the squat pen rests. I'll dig with it," shows that he would still continue his father and grandfather's tradition of skill and hard work by using a different kind of tool - a pen. Even though Heaney will make a living with by writing, he'll still be able to connect with his father and grandfather, for instead of using the spade to dig up earth; he will use a pen dig up words and express it in his writings. It is clearly seen, that the mood and effect the author wanted to project, should have a positive atmosphere. The author wanted to show a happy memory of him when he was admiring the works of his father and grandfather. It can be seen in the lines such as: "My grandfather could cut more turf in a day than any other man on Toner's bog. Once I carried him milk in a bottle corked sloppily with paper. He straightened up to drink it, then fell to right

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  • Word count: 618
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Method used in Limbo.

What methods are used in 'Limbo'? Limbo, by Edward Kamau Brathwaite, is a poem about slavery. In this essay I am going to be looking at the different methods that are used in the poem. Firstly, the layout of the poem. It is split into lots of short stanzas with some lines only containing one word. This is so that it keeps the rhythm. Limbo is a dance and this meaning of the word is shown through the layout. There is also a lot of dactyls. These are one stressed syllable followed by two unstressed syllables. 'over me', 'under me', 'calling me' etc. these add to the rhythm. The rhythm however is broken in the last line. This could show the end of the dance, the end of the poem or the end of the slavery. There is no punctuation in the poem. This is because the rhythm which you read it to forces you to pause in the correct places anyway so there is no need for it. There is a lot of repetition in the poem, this could be for a number of reasons. It could be like a chorus in a song which repeats a number of times. It could show how slavery was repeated until it stopped finally. Or it could be to emphasise the points, for example 'stick is the whip'. This could be to emphasise how they are being hit and it could also show how they are being treated like animals. Animals such as horses are whipped to make them run faster; they could be treated like animals and whipped to make

  • Word count: 607
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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The poem Limbo is an extended metaphor for the parallel stories of the slaves journey alongside the limbo dance. Throughout the poem, lines and stanzas can be interpreted in many different ways due to the many meanings of the overall message.

The poem Limbo is an extended metaphor for the parallel stories of the slave's journey alongside the limbo dance. Throughout the poem, lines and stanzas can be interpreted in many different ways due to the many meanings of the overall message. The title, "Limbo" itself has many different meanings. For example, the word stereotypically relates to the dance, made up by the slaves on board the ship in order to stay fit when attached to iron bars, in which the dancer has to go under the stick without touching it in order to stay in the game. The title also means a region on the border between Heaven and Hell, referring to the slave's journey on the ship as, in their eyes, India is Heaven and America is Hell, and they are in the middle of the two, journeying towards Hell. Alternatively, the word means a state of uncertainty or a state of imprisonment or confinement. The slave's were imprisoned on the ship with no means of escape, their future already mapped out in front of them. The poem is set out into 24 loose and rhythmic stanzas of varying lengths, giving the poem a beat as means to giving it backing music which the dance would involve. There are 7 repetitive choruses, making it seem more like a dance. These choruses are presented in italics to represent the echoing of the slave's replies to the guards. A lot of language devices have been applied in "Limbo". The word

  • Word count: 427
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Analysis Of the poem 'Limbo'

The Poem 'Limbo' is based upon slave trade. Men and women from Africa were captured and taken to America to become slaves. The term Limbo has three different meanings: a state of uncertainty, being on the borders of hell, and a traditional west Indies dance where the dancer has to bend over backwards to dance under a stick. All of these meaning are explored within the poem. The limbo stick in line 1 represents the sticks used to beat and whip the slaves in punishment, pushing them down both physically and metaphorically by breaking the slaves down psychologically by humiliation and subjugation. The poem is written in free verse and structured to a drum beat, like a traditional limbo dance as well as representing the drum beat in which the slaves had to work to and beaten to. The chorus 'limbo, limbo like me' is repeated throughout the poem representing the constant beatings and oppression which the slaves endured. In line 7 the term 'long dark night' represents the loneliness and despair of the slaves; they felt isolated and alone, in a state of darkness or uncertainty which is another meaning for the term 'limbo'. The slaves were also socially isolated due to being unable to speak English (line 7) 'the silence in front of me'. In line 16 alliteration is used to emphasise the slaves' anger and frustration of subjugation and oppression and the loss of their identity.

  • Word count: 415
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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How Successfully The Writer Of An Unknown Girl Presents Her Feelings About The Countries She Visited

An Unknown Girl – How Successfully The Writer Of ‘An Unknown Girl’ Presents Her Feelings About The Countries She Visited ‘An Unknown Girl’, a poem detailing an English women’s experience in India, focuses on the themes of cultural identity and the contrast of east and west. The Englishwoman whom this poem is centred around appears to be fascinated by the native Indian culture she encounters during her time in the country. The western invasion of the east is a key theme in this poem and is produced by regular contrast of tradition. For example the writer describes the dummies in the shop windows to have ‘western perms’. The dummies, which are designed to display desirable and new style, all have ‘western perms’ showing that this new style is now considered not only normal but fashionable in India, despite it contrasting with more traditional hair styles. The personification of these dummies also helps to further the point of the west invading the east. The infiltration of the west into traditional eastern society is portrayed in a negative light in this poem. The references made to western things are often things that are not natural such as the western perm of the beauty pageants where the competitors wear make-up. The presentation of the West as unnatural helps to reinforce the idea of the West ruining traditional Indian culture. Feelings of loss are

  • Word count: 408
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Ode To The English Exam

Ode To The English Exam So here is my ode To the English exam The one that I've dreaded And tortured, and crammed. I've honestly tried To faithfully study. But it's much more fun To laugh with my buddy. So early this morning Through red, bleary eyes I reach for my book And wearily revise. The exam starts at 9, A hot chocolate I drink I review all my notes As I start to think. I know that late night Was really not wise. Sometimes I am stupid I now

  • Word count: 94
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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