How does Shakespeare create the

Introduction A Midsummer night's Dream is a romantic comedy play. This play was written in the 1590s by William Shakespeare. The play consists of two pairs of lovers who run away into the wood on a midsummer's night. While sleeping in the wood the king of the fairies, Oberon tells his servant Puck to drop flower drops onto the eyes of Lysander and Demetrius. This causes confusion because both men fall in love with Helena. Also in the wood a group of workers are rehearsing a play for the wedding of Duke Theseus. Because Oberon's wife won't give him an Indian boy, he turns Bottom's head into an ass's head and makes his wife fall in love with him for revenge and amusement. In the end all the problems are worked out. The lovers are reunited and the mechanicals perform their play at the wedding ceremony. In this play Shakespeare creates three distinct worlds on the stage: the world of the court, the world of the mechanicals and the world of the fairies. He creates these worlds through his choice of language, settings and the characters themselves. Act 1 Scene 1 - The World of the Court In the world of the court we are introduced to some of the main characters and themes of love and enchantment. The people in this scene are upper class. The very first scene of the play is set in the palace of Duke Theseus, The Duke of Athens. Preparations are going underway for the Duke's

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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A Midsummer Night's Dream Plot Outline

A Midsummer Night's Dream Christen N. Barnette Shorter University English 1120 Drama Essay Stephen Barnes July 13, 2010 A Midsummer Night's Dream A Midsummer Night's Dream is a comedy written by William Shakespeare about three couples in love in Athens. The first couple is Theseus and Hippolyta. The second is Lysander and Hermia then Demetrius and Helena who are not yet a couple. There are fairies that mix up things and cause two men to fall in love with the same woman and fight over her. Some local men gather to work on a play for the upcoming marriage of Theseus and Hippolyta. In the end everyone has found happiness. Act 1 The first act starts at Theseus' court in Athens. Theseus is with his soon to be wife Hippolyta talking about their marriage in four days and how they cannot wait until then. They are then approached by a man named Egeus with concerns of his daughter Hermia who is in love with a man he does not approve of. She is in love with Lysander and he is in love with her but Demetrius is also in love with Hermia and her father approves of him and wants her to marry Demetrius and not Lysander. Theseus then gives Hermia until the next new moon to decide if she will marry Demetrius and make her father happy, or be killed for loving a man her father does not approve of or become a nun and have no man at all. She continues to tell of her love for Lysander and

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Key Qualities of Youth in a Midsummer Night's Dream

Key Qualities of Youth in A Midsummer Night's Dream The key qualities of youth differ on the time of age they are in because children of different ages behave in different ways. However, in Shakespeare's play, A Midsummer Night's Dream, the youth are shown to only care about their personal lives, which usually have a positive or negative effect in every situation they are in. The youth's most evident characteristics are honesty and recklessness. An analysis of Lysander, Hermia, Helena and Demetrius' actions displays the fact that they always tell the truth, but tend to go over the line of wisdom, with an indifference to the rules. Youth is a term that refers to adolescents. Adolescents are children or teenagers who have not reached full maturity. Honesty is a quality or trait which means to be truthful, frank and sincere. Recklessness, on the other hand, involves being daring, hasty and thoughtless. To be reckless means to be unconcerned about the consequences of any action. One of the key qualities of youth is honesty because the youth in A Midsummer Night's Dream never lie, and are often straight to the point with a disregard of other people's feelings. An example of Lysander being honest occurs when he is under the flower's spell, in the woods, and bluntly tells Hermia that he is in love with Helena with an indifference to Hermia's feelings. Ay, by my life; And never

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  • Subject: English
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To what extent is the mechanicals’ performance of Pyramus and Thisby a success?

Cerys Speakman, 10K To what extent is the mechanicals' performance of Pyramus and Thisby a success? 'A Midsummer Nights Dream' is a play about love, magic and comedy. At the start of the play, there are four days until the Duke Theseus and his lady Hippolyta get married. At the court, there are four young people; Hermia, Demetrius, Helena and Lysander. Hermia and Lysander love each other, Demetrius loves Hermia, and Helena loves Demetrius. Titania and Oberon are the King and Queen of the fairies. Oberon decides to play a trick on Titania because they are having an argument over a slave boy. Oberon gets his trusty slave Puck to use a "Love in Idleness" flower to make Demetrius love Helena. Puck gets confused and mixes up the people. Oberon uses the "Love in Idleness" flower on Titania, hoping that she will fall in love with something monstrous. When she wakes up she sees Bottom, who Puck had mischievously given an Asses head. She falls in love with Bottom. Oberon tells Puck to correct his mistakes, but he doesn't quite get it right. Now, Hermia loves Lysander who loves Helena. Demetrius also loves Helena. Helena doesn't love anyone and isn't happy because she feels that everyone is making a mockery of her. Oberon uses the love flower to make Titania love him again. Puck sorts out the mess and makes it so that Hermia and Lysander love each other and Demetrius and Helena

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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A Midsummer Night's Dream Essay

"A Midsummer Night's Dream" Essay "A Midsummer Night's Dream", one of Shakespeare's most beloved comedies, is generally thought of as a comical romance. A very important factor that makes the whole play a comedy, is magic, which is used to affect the lives of four Athenians: Hermia, Lysander, Helena and Demetrius. Bottom, also a simple human, falls victim of the fairies' mischievous magic. The magic reaches these characters by Puck, a naughty fairy, and Oberon, the king of fairies. Puck decides to cast a spell on Bottom, making him grow a donkey head, and Oberon decides to cast a spell on Titania, making her fall in love with Bottom. From a simple mistaken spell, a rollercoaster of emotions, conflicts and laughter emerge. Magic is a vital element in "A Midsummer Night's Dream" because it gives the four Athenians a new life after the two men get cast a spell on, and Titania, falling in love with an ass head. Magic also causes the lovers to find that love is no smooth enterprise as stated by Lysander; "The course of true love never did run smooth." (1-1 ll. 134). Their pursuit of love may not run smooth but most, although not all, of the lovers end up happy. Hermia and Lysander find that they cannot be together so they elope to the woods where they then become victims of Puck and Helena cannot seem to make Demetrius love her until Puck's interference, and then she does not

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Life Before Lysander

Life Before Lysander The news reports on the TV shortly before it happened showed the smiling faces of scientists in their crisp white coats, proudly congratulating each other for the creation of this new chemical, represented in the images before my eyes as a tiny cylinder filled with an evanescing yellow gas. It seemed harmless to me really, just an extra concentrated form of a new chemical compound. Developed secretly in America, its very existence had only just been officially declared by the U.S government, because it was deadly in smaller doses than sionide, and more easily spread than anthrax. Lysander 3, it was called. That was the first time I heard it. That name, those two little words which would change our world forever. It was April when it happened. Just a bright flash, that was all, just a white flash in the sky, no explosion and no noise. It all seemed to happen so fast, and from so far away, that I didn't even have time to jump, and no one really knew what was going on. For a few glorious hours, people just seemed to laugh it off, going about their daily lives, oblivious to their horrific and inevitable fates. But then it started. Emergency news reports slicing into broadcasts simultaneously on every channel, news reporters calmly explaining that a phial of Lysander 3 had been stolen by a new radical terrorist group called Avalanche. Their faces were

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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In What Ways Does Shakespeare Create Disorder And Confusion in Act 3 Scene 2?

Richard Taylor In What Ways Does Shakespeare Create Disorder And Confusion in Act 3 Scene 2? Here are many ways in which Shakespeare creates disorder and confusion in act 3 scene 2. One of the ways in which he does this is to bring in the supernatural aspect of the play into the scene. Such as the fact that an "outside force", which are Oberon and Puck, interfere with and control the affairs of the players (Hermia, Helena, Demetrius and Lysander). He brings the supernatural in with the fairies. While asleep, Puck squeezes the juice of a flower into the eyes of Lysander, thus making him fall in love with the first person he sees. He is woken by Helena who he then falls in love with and this begins the havoc. Every time the couples encounter there is always more confusion with their arguing. Soon the fairies realise their mistake, so Puck squeezes the juice into Demetrius eyes which also makes him fall in love with Helena. This confusion continues to spiral out of control due to the fairies intervention and Puck's mistake. Because Helena's love for Demetrius has previously been in vain and he now loves her also as Lysander, she believes that they are both mocking her as they are both suddenly mysteriously and madly in love with her. I can tell that she believes they are all mocking her because in act 3 scene 2 - line 168, Helena says "Never did mockers waste more idle

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A middsummer nights dream

How does Shakespeare use the two settings of 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' to explore the two sides of human conciousness This essay will be discussing the play 'A Midsummer Night's Dream', written by the popular playwright William Shakespeare. The play is a romantic comedy, it addresses many issues that were around in the period it was written. These issues include such things as women's rights and the dominance of male society and quite severe class divides. The play is set in two different places, the domestic and public sphere, represented by the city of Athens and the home, this is the waking concious world where there are rules and regulations and everyone has a set place, the other setting is the woods, this is the subconscious world ruled by fairies and full of magic, in this world anything can happen, people change roles in society and spells are cast. This essay will be discussing the importance of these factors and also discussing aspects of control and other topics that are visible throughout the essay. We see the first aspect of control in the play in the first act of scene one, when Theseus is talking to Hippolyta in his palace the day before the wedding: "Hippolyta, I wooed thee with my sword, And won thy love, doing thee injuries; But I will wed thee in another key, With pomp, with triumph and with revelling." This shows that Duke Theseus sees Hippolyta

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  • Level: GCSE
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How does Shakespeare make Act III scene I of A Midsummer Night(TM)s Dream dramatically effective?

How does Shakespeare make Act III scene I of A Midsummer Night's Dream dramatically effective? Introduction This scene is very important to the play as it is the point at which the two completely separate groups (the mortals and the fairies) are brought together. Before they had nothing to do with each other and were unaware of each others existence. This turns out to be a huge mistake that they come together, everything is turned upside down, mainly thanks to Puck. After this scene, everything is different: the groups have come together and the characters' situations change. The Actors Rehearse The play is not going as well as the actors thought it would. Quince seems to be in charge and directing the play but Bottom is not happy with this at all. He wants to direct himself. He butts in and wants to play every part 'let it be written in eight and eight' and he is not content with the way Quince is doing things so makes it as hard as he can for him. In Shakespeare's time the theatre was very different to nowadays. The stage was bare and they used very little scenery, with all performances taking place in the afternoon and in open air. This meant that the audience had to use their minds and imagine everything. The effectiveness of the whole play had to be portrayed through the language and the acting which was a lot harder than today as we have scenery, props and music

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How does Shakespeare present each group of characters in A Midsummer Nights Dream

The whole play revolves around four main groups: the fairies, the mechanicals, the royals and the lovers. These four groups all have their own reasons for ending up together in the same wood. The groups affect and entwine with each other. An example of this is when Bottom from the mechanicals is turned into a donkey as part of Oberon the fairy kings revenge on his wife Titania queen of the fairies. The lovers are affected because Puck under Oberon's command changes which of the lovers loves whom. The royals allow the lovers in the end to marry as they choose. The fairies are a magical race they can control the seasons and are very powerful. Shakespeare's language shows that the fairies are not human by using poetic, descriptive and light language with lots of alliteration, and onomatopoeia, "warbling". After every line the last two words rhyme in a rhyming couplet, "Now, until the break of day, Through this house each fairy stray." There are three main characters in the fairies; Oberon is the fairy king he arguing with his wife the fairy queen Titania over an Indian boy. Titania has taken it upon herself to raise and look after the Indian boy for a friend but Oberon thinks she has had another lover and that it is his child so he wants it for his servant. This argument means that the seasons change. Puck the other main character in the fairies is Oberon's "right hand man"

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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