Puck. From my interpretation of the character, Puck, I have concluded that he is mischievous, but not malevolent. In an earlier scene, he states that he is a mischief-maker,

Puck. From my interpretation of the character, Puck, I have concluded that he is mischievous, but not malevolent. In an earlier scene, he states that he is a mischief-maker, and his love for mischief is evident from many things he says in 3:2. For example; "Then will two at once woo one; That must needs be sport alone; And those things do best please me That befall preposterously." He is saying that when two men love one girl, it will put things in a whirl, and the things that please him happen in a ridiculous way. So he will find the Lysander-Demetrius-Helena love triangle highly amusing. I would not play Puck in a malevolent way, because as jester to Oberon, and a "mad spirit" as Oberon calls him, he is likely to find the entire situation of 3:2 extremely funny and entertaining, because he loves mischief and ridiculous situations so I as Puck, I would chuckle to myself, like a child would at some parts of the scene. As a costume for Puck, I would use earthy colours; browns and greens, because he is very at home in the forest and blends in very well. I would use different colours for Puck then to the rest of the fairies, who would be dressed in generally lighter colours, for example, white. I would have Puck to be very hairy, because he is so earthy and natural, and perhaps give the character a small pair of horns, to represent his cheeky devilish streak An

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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How does Shakespeare present Bottom as a humorous character

A Midsummer Night's Dream How does Shakespeare present Bottom as a humorous character in Act 3, Scene 1? In his play 'A Midsummer Night's Dream', William Shakespeare is presenting his character Bottom, as one of the somewhat witty characters. That is especially to be seen in Act 3, Scene 1, in which Bottom has his head transformed into a donkey's head. One of the first things that clearly show the idiocy of Bottom is how he always thinks, that he the greatest of all; his pompous attitude. It's like he wants everyone to look at him, he wants to speak more, such as when he wants the prologue, to be in eight and eight instead of eight six, which is actually what Shakespeare used to write his prologues in. - Shakespeare makes Bottom, who is a fictional character that he invented himself, show a discrepancy with what Shakespeare usually does. - It's like he's telling his own creator, that "You don't know how to carry out a good play, why don't you just sit down, while I tell you how to do it the right way". He keeps on saying: "I'm the best, I'm the best!" while, as shown by his constant slip-ups, it's clear that he's definitely not the brightest, like when he's shouting some sort of sonnet, to show that 'he knows what he's doing' but he says a lot of it wrong and uses some of the words mistaken. - A thing Shakespeare does deliberately to make Bottom even more humorous, which

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Midsummers' Night dream

Discuss the importance of magic in A Midsummer Night's Dream. A Midsummer Night's Dream is one of Shakespeare's well known romantic comedies written sometime in the sixteenth century. The play is an adventure of four young Athenian lovers and a group of laborious and graceful actors in a forest. These amateur actors are attempting to stage their play at the wedding of The Duke of Athens, Theseus, and the Queen of Amazon, Hippolyta. The play is set in a moonlit forest where the world of the 'fairies' collide with the lover's world. These fairies cause all the magic in the play and the consequences of it are chaos, comedy and resolution. Why did Shakespeare write this supernatural comedy? This play was first played at a wedding during the Elizabethan when comedies were very popular. All comedies contained five elements which were essential. These are wit, verbal jokes, mistaken identity, music and poetry. Wit was seen as a silly argument and the first example of it is when the two men fight over Hermia. For example Lysander describes Demetrius as a 'spotted and inconstant man'. This is also an example of a verbal joke which is seen throughout the play. An example of mistaken identity can be seen when Bottom has been transformed into an ass by Puck's magic. When snout says to Bottom 'Thou are changed' we see this. Poetry is used by all characters apart from the mechanicals who

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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A Midsummer Night's Dream - How might the staging of Act IV Scene I emphasize the influence of the spirit world on the human world?

A Midsummer Night's Dream How might the staging of Act IV Scene I emphasize the influence of the spirit world on the human world? Note: My essay is going to explore the ways of staging this scene in the Globe, London. At the start of this scene, the conflict between Titania and Oberon over the Indian child has made Oberon embarrass Titania by magically making her fall in love with bottom. Puck had earlier turned Bottom into an ass to make an even bigger fool of Titania. For this scene I will drape brown and green cloth down the rear of the stage to create an image of a forest. I will also have two very tall and wide wooden pillars. These will be painted to look like trees and decorated with similar, but glittering, cloth towards the top. These will be the platforms for some of the fairies later in the scene. I will launch the scene with Bottom sitting at the front-right of the stage with Titania and the other fairies around him. Puck, who cast the spell on Titania and Bottom, is up on the right pillar looking down on them. The flower he used should be prominently displayed on stage when characters under its spell are performing. On stage, Titania should be dressed in a long shimmering dress, possibly in shades of purple and red to portray her as a regal but magical character. She should, in addition to this, be acting at a higher level than the fairies to

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Discuss Pucks role in A Midsummer Nights Dream.

Discuss Puck's role in A Midsummer Night's Dream. In A Midsummer's Dream, Puck is a 'sprite', a creature with magical powers, similar to a pixie or an elf. He is Oberon's jester and henchman. He also serves another role in the play by interpreting it for the audience and commenting on the action of the play. Puck explains why the King and Queen of fairies are quarreling, ' she as her attendant hath a lovely boy, stol'n from the Indian King. She had never had so sweet a changeling, And jealous Oberon would have the child... But she perforce withholds the loved boy...', this enlightens the audience about Oberon and Titania's quarrel. It gives the audience some background information and helps them understand the plot better. Puck is also a very critical character, he calls the craftsmen ' Hempen homespuns' and the lovers as 'mortals... fools be'. These might also represent what the audience themselves think of the characters especially the craftsmen and lovers. Therefore, Puck signifies an important role in explaining and commenting on the play and their characters. Puck also plays a humorous role in A Midsummer Night's Dream. He causes some of the most comical moments of the play, example when Puck transform Bottom's head into that of an ass(donkey), and when the craftsmen saw Bottom with an ass hear, their reaction was hilarious. They scrambled to get out of the woods and

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  • Level: GCSE
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A Midsummer Night's Dream. The play is mainly about the madness, lawlessness and laughableness of love. Discuss.

The play is mainly about the madness, lawlessness and laughableness of love. Discuss. A Midsummer Night's Dream, Shakespeare shows many different kinds of love. However, despite the mature and rational love of Theseus and Hippolyta , the more frantic, passionate and unstable love of the young people ultimately reflects the madness, lawlessness and laughableness of love in the play. Madness of love is the theme that ties together various sections of the play, from Demetrius' transfer of affection from Helena to Hermia and then back to Helena, to Titania's temporary love for Bottom. It is this madness that often cause the lovers to seem lack of senses and judgment. Love is a kind of madness, in which the victim may be intellectually aware of his illusion but is unable to resist it. Love in the play has no basis of reality. Though they are entirely devoid of judgment, the victims of love are ironically under the delusion that their choice is full of reason. The parental love Egeus has for Hermia seems to consist madness too. His strong sense of patriarchy overrules his love for Hermia, so much so that he 'beg the ancient privilege of Athens. As she is mine, I may dispose of her Which shall be either to this gentleman Or to her death'. It seems ridiculous and unbelievable that a father would rather let his daughter die than allow her to marry the man she loves. Indeed,

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Role of the Craftsmen

Describe the function of Bottom and his fellow craftsmen in the play. Bottom and his fellow craftsmen are bubbly, animated and optimistic to a fault. With their amiable exuberance and whole-hearted cheerfulness, they are often seen as the most likeable characters in 'A Midsummer Night's Dream'. In terms of function, their presence serves to create humour and act as a foil to the upper echelons of Athenian society. With their play-within a play, Shakespeare also creates a parody of youthful impassioned love and a sturdy reminder of reality amidst all the magic and chaos in the forest. Bottom and his fellow craftsmen with their good-humoured disposition create humour through their amusing malapropisms and unsophisticated poetry. For instance the craftsmen often use words out of context to hilarious results, like when Flute as Thisbe calls Pyramus 'Jew' when he probably meant jewel. To fully understand the humour here, one must realize that in Shakespearean times, Jews were widely loathed and thus would be the opposite of 'jewel, thereby thoroughly tickling an Elizabethan audience. Another example of this is when Bottom as Pyramus mistakenly asks Thisbe to meet him at 'Ninny's' instead of 'Ninus' Tomb'. Here, a ninny refers to an imbecile, whereas Ninus' refers to the legendary founder of Nineveh. Shakespeare's audience would very likely have been able to pick this up and see

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Midsummer Nights Dream Act II Questions and Answers

Midsummer Nights Dream Act II . a) The first plot consists of the love affairs of four characters: Lysander, Demetrius, Hermia, and Helena. In basic form, Hermia loves Lysander, Lysander loves Hermia, Helena loves Demetrius but he detests her and prefers Hermia. Problem arises when Hermia’s Father chooses Demetrius over Lysander and Hermia is conflicted in either marrying him or being a nun for life. She doesn't favour both options and plots to run away with Lysander together in the forest. b) The second plot focuses on Oberon and Titania, rulers of the fairies, having relationship problems. Titania is handed an Indian boy whom she’s obligated to take care and who she adores while not paying attention to her partner Oberon. Oberon soon plots revenge against Puck, the mischievous boy. c) The last of the subplots comprises of a play "Pyramus and Thisbe", being performed by a group of peasants in order to a get grand prize from the nuptial ceremony of Theseus and Hippolyta. The one that stands out the most is the town’s weaver, Bottom, a man with very high self-esteem, and has the confidence (or so he thinks) that he can play any of the parts. 2. In the beginning, Hermia is shown to be refusing her fathers order, Egeus, upon marrying his chosen man, Demetrius. In response, Egeus goes to the duke for her disobedience in response for death, Theseus whom

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Importance of Magic in a Midsummer Night's Dream

Oliver Newland Task: Discuss the importance of magic in A Midsummer Night's Dream 0c1 English Coursework Magic is probably the main theme in A Midsummer Nights Dream. It plays a vital and extensive role in each story - line. Each time Shakespeare uses magic, there is an important - if subtle - consequence. Shakespeare explores many aspects of magic, including how it causes problems and how it solves them. Magic is often used by Shakespeare to support and implement the comedic sections of the play. Before I explore the importance of magic in the play, I must explore magic itself, as it means different things to different people and to different cultures. Magic is defined in the dictionary as "Any art that invokes supernatural powers". However, to other people and the majority of religions, magic is an evil force within the world, practiced by sinners and wrong - doers. This seems to be the main view of the society Shakespeare lived in. However, nowadays magic is generally not believed in. This seems to be Shakespeare's point of view; this can be seen by his use of magic to create a comedic and mischievous - though certainly not evil- atmosphere throughout the play. In this way, Shakespeare could be seen as a writer ahead of his time. The effects of magic in A Midsummer Night's Dream may have been influenced by the social attitude of the

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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A Midsummer Night's Dream- Play within a play

Discuss the role of the play- within- a- play in Act V of A Midsummer Night's Dream. Does the Pyramus and Thisbe story have any relevance to the main story, or is it simply a comical interlude? What effect does the mechanicals production of their play have on the tone of the play as a whole? The Pymamus and Thisbe story in Act V of A Midsummer Night's Dream plays an important role to the main story. Not only does the play- within- a- play echoes with the story of the four lovers- Helena, Hermia, Lysander and Demetrius, it also serves as a reinforcement of the theme: love. Though the mechanicals' production seems to be a comic interlude, it is a warning to both the pairs of lovers and to the audience about the potential danger brought by love's blindness. Despite the tragic content of the play- within- a- play, the mechanicals' comic illustration and performance makes the play a lot more lighthearted. On top of that, the play- within- a- play brings in the major message of the story- that "the best in this kind [of play] are but shadows; and the worst are no worse, if imagination amend[s] them." The echo between the two plays starts at the very beginning of the Pymamus and Thisbe story. Objections from the father of Thisby act as a "wall" "stand[ing] between" Thisbe and Pyramus. Despite the objection from the great father authority, the "fearful lovers" risk everything just

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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