Conflicts in Midsummer Night's Dream

In William Shakespeare’s play, ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’, there are lots of different conflicts. The audience finds conflict interesting to watch because it creates drama and tension. Throughout the play, the theme of conflict with authority is apparent and is the cause of the problems of the characters, there is conflict between friends and lovers, parents and children, governors and the governed. As in Shakespeare’s different dramas, the thematic of mistaken identities, hidden identities and deceptive identities creates many of the conflicts between the characters. The passage below, spoken by Theseus in the opening scene of the play, clearly states this theme: “Be advised fair maid. To you your father should be as god- One that composed your beauties, yea, and one To whom you are but as a form in wax By him imprinted, and within his power To leave the figure or disfigure it” – Act 1, scene 1. The first example of conflict in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, is in the exposition scene and it sets up the conflict for the rest of the play. Hermia and Lysander, two young Athenians, are in love. They want to get married but Hermias father, Egueus, disagrees. He wants her to marry Demetrius, who is in love with her. She refuses to follow her father’s instruction, he declares that if Hermia won't marry Demetrius, she will die: This is the law of

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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More then one type of love in Mid Summer Nights Dream

Gabriel Patino 12/8/11 Doc Schmidt English More than one type of love By definition love is a profoundly tender and passionate affection for another person. Love is a disease that can make you do things you’ve never think of doing. This powerful emotion affects your behavior and personality and is demonstrated through the characters of Midsummer Nights Dream. But what determines whom we love; is it beauty, intellect or both? Is it possible for love to be perfect? Lysander proclaims, "The course of true love never did run smooth." Act 1, Scene 1, line 134, this means that no matter how much you love someone there will always be obstructions in the way. Thesesus, Egeus, and the fairies are all obstacles for the four main lovers, Hermia, Lysander, Demetrius, and Helena. The biggest obstruction to love is love itself, because it is an emotion that can change drastically in a blink of an eye. But is there more than one type of love? Prior to reading Midsummer Nights Dream, we read two sonnets by Shakespeare discussing two different types of love and gave of an insight on his views. One of the two loves described was the love of infatuation. Shakespeare considers this love as a fever longing still. This type of love is similar to a rollercoaster, it goes up and down and right when you think your going straight and everything is stable,

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Comment on the different kinds if dramatic speech in this extract - Act 3 Scene 2 (413-463) A Midsummer Nights Dream.

Comment on the different kinds if dramatic speech in this extract. Act 3 Scene 2 (413-463) In Act 3 Scene 2, there is a confrontation between the four lovers Helena, Hermia, Lysander and Demetrius. Towards the end of the scene, Puck leads the lovers in the wood through 'drooping fog' to sleep in order to restore their proper vision. Puck does this by imitating the voices of Lysander and Demetrius which Shakespeare uses as a speech rather than a conversation. Shakespeare uses many different techniques in this extract such as, repetition, rhyming couplets, quatrians and dramatic irony . Lysander's language reflects his feelings of revenge and as he seeks Demetrius to fight a duel, he is very competitive, 'I follow'd fast, but faster he did fly'. 'He goes before me, and still hares me on;' This shows that Lysander is immature and selfish as his character is presented through his words of revenge and competitiveness. Lysander's last line in his speech further emphasises the obsession with revenge, 'I'll find Demetrius and revenge this spite'. The character of Demetrius is also presented in a manly macho way where all his thoughts involve revenge on Lysander, 'Nay then, thou mock'st me. Thou shalt buy this dear'. Demetrius is also competitive and this emphasises his macho behaviour. Demetrius is presented in the same light as Lysander in which he is obsessed with revenge and

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Where does the chaos lie in the first two acts of A Midsummer Nights Dream?

Where does the chaos lie in the first two acts of "A Midsummer Night's Dream"? It seems the main source of chaos in the first two acts of A Midsummer Night's Dream is love. Indeed, in Act 1 Scene 1, we can find many love relations : Theseus, duke of Athens, and Hippolyta, Queen of the Amazons are engaged and are going to get married very soon. In this case, both of them love each other and everything goes well. This is the initial situation. Nevertheless, there come on stage four young Athenians, who all have different lovers from those they must marry. Our four characters are Lysander, Hermia, Demetrius, and Helena. Helena loves Demetrius but the latter doesn't love her, which causes her complete desperation. As a matter of fact, Helena's problem brings more chaos : she submits herself, and even comes to a point where, in Act 2 Scene 2, she says : line 203, page 39 "I am you spaniel" which shoes her complete submission. This way of behaving shoes real chaos there. As well, Demetrius loves Hermia, but Hermia loves Lysander. That's the only two among the four Athenians who love each other : Lysander and Hermia. But, chaos comes another time because they are not allowed to marry, but this is another type of chaos. In the end, we understand that this situation his really complicated, and chaotic for most of the characters except Theseus and Hippolyta. In Act 2 Scene 1, we

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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What qualities would you look for in casting the actors playing Helena and Hermia and how would you direct the opening scene of the play in order to convey their similarities and/or differences to an audience?

Stacey Barlow What qualities would you look for in casting the actors playing Helena and Hermia and how would you direct the opening scene of the play in order to convey their similarities and/or differences to an audience? Helena and Hermia are the young women involved in the confusing love tangle that develops through the play. They were very close when young and have been friends for a while so they are likely to be similar in ways but yet different in others. When casting Helena I would cast her as a tall young woman. I would do the opposite when casting Hermia and have her has a short young woman. I decided to have this difference because it is indicated in the text that they are physically like this. I.e. in Act 3, Scene 2 they are arguing. Hermia is often referred to as "dwarfish" or "little". Helena is referred to as a "painted maypole" which suggests she is tall. It also suggests that she wears a lot of make-up. I would therefore have both the young women as very pretty; but Hermia would have more natural beauty whereas Helena would need make-up to make her stunning. This would give Helena a reason for why Demetrius' affection is with Hermia, and so a reason for wanting to look like her. I would also have Hermia as dark skinned and short dark haired because in the play she is referred to as an "ethiop", which is a racist comment suggesting she is darker

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Midsummer Nights Dream

A Midsummer Night's Dream, quote response/analysis There are many themes in William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream(1595 or 1596), the main theme of the play is love. The main plot of the play is composed of the interaction of two Athenian couples(Hermia and Lysander, Helena, and Demetrius), and Theseus(the duke of Athens), Hippolyta(Theseus' soon to be wife), and Egeus(Hermias father who does not consent of her love to Lysander. Whose romantic purposes are complicated even more when they enter the woods, in which the King and Queen of the fairies(Oberon, and Titania), and Puck,(also known as Robin Goodfellow)the mischievous imp all reside. Then all goes wrong when the fairies interfere between the lovers, but in the end all is restored back to its natural order. In the subplot of the play, another set of characters-Bottom the weaver and his band of "rude mechanicals"-stumble into the main doings when they go into the same enchanted woods to rehearse a play that is based on the myth of Pyramus and Thisbe, their hilarious piece takes up Act V of Shakespeare's romantic comedy. In this play, Shakespeare creates three worlds: the noble, aristocratic world of the Athenian court, the mundane world of the mechanicals, and the fantastical fairy world. Through the language of the inhabitants Shakespeare give each world its distinct atmosphere. Through the language of:

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Forced Love in "A Midsummer Night's Dream"

Price Alison Price Mr. Stam English I 0 May 2012 Forced Love The play “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” by William Shakespeare is about four Athenian lovers who run away to escape the Athenian law. Hermia and Lysander go into the forest to get married while Demetrius and Helena follow. Puck and Oberon are very mischievous fairies. They put love potion that comes from a flower on the lovers and mix up who loves whom. The potion causes a person to love the first thing they see, even an animal. Dreams cause confusion by forcing love. The potion causes the four lovers and Titania love the wrong person while dreams make things more confusing. The potion majorly affects the Athenian lovers: they fall in love with the wrong person. Helena is in love with Demetrius, and Demetrius can’t stand Helena. Oberon and Puck see them conversing in the woods and Oberon decides to put the flower juice on Demetrius, “ A sweet Athenian lady is in love With a disdainful youth; anoint his eyes, But do it when the next thing he espies May be the lady”(Shakespeare, II.i.25). Oberon demands that Puck must put the flower on the Athenian man’s eyes. Oberon wants Demetrius to fall in love with Helena. But something goes wrong: “What has thou done? Thou hast mistaken quite/ and laid the love juice on some true-love’s sight.”(III.ii.43). Oberon realizes that Puck put the

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Puck's Mischief

Puck may be mischievous, but he is not cruel or evil. Do you agree? I agree to a large extent that; although Puck may be mischievous and playful, it does not mean that he is inherently cruel and evil. Mischievousness, implies a sort of roguish fondness for trickery and pranks, this however does not necessarily dictate that Puck is evil at heart. At the outset, the first impression the audience receives of Puck is that of a merry prankster and not a hard-hearted plotter who wishes ill. The first fairy the audience meets describes Puck as a 'shrewd and knavish sprite' referring directly to his mischievous spirit. The fairy describes Puck's pranks of making 'the drink to bear no barm' and Puck himself talks about how he 'jest[s] to Oberon, and make[s] him smile' and even pretends to be a stool only to disappear when one wants to sit; all of which though they may sometimes be unkind, do not mean any serious harm. Thus from the beginning, Shakespeare creates the impression of a character that delights in mischief, but does not go out of his way to harm people. Though Puck catalyses the conflict between the lovers, it is not because of evil intent that he does this. In fact if anyone should be deemed cruel or evil in A Midsummer Night's Dream, it should be Oberon. As it was due to carrying out Oberon's orders, Puck caused the confusion amongst the lovers seen in Act 3 Scene 2.

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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What devices does Shakespeare use to show the differences between the Court and the Mechanicals in Act I of A Midsummer Nights Dream?

What devices does Shakespeare use to show the differences between the Court and the Mechanicals in Act I of A Midsummer Night's Dream? In Act I of A Midsummer Night's Dream, Shakespeare uses a variety of devices to illustrate the differences between the aristocrats of Theseus' Court and the humble workmen, the Mechanicals, ranging from setting and imagery to humour and formality. The Court are very serious-poor Hermia has to worry about being put to death if she doesn't marry Demetrious-whom her father (Egeus) has chosen for her to marry, whereas the Mechanicals are very humorous-Bottom considers himself to be a professional actor when he actually just makes a complete fool out of himself when he tries to impersonate the Court in their language. One of the devices Shakespeare uses is language. The language of the Court is presented in verse, balanced, in iambic parameter, elaborate and dignified, whether talking in love or anger. Theseus apologises formally to Hippolyta for having conquered her in battle: "Hippolyta, I woo'd thee with my sword, And won thy love by doing these injures, But I will wed thee in another key, With pomp, with triumph..." Egeus accuses Lysander angrily; "Thou hast by moonlight at her windows sung, With feigning voices of feigning love, And stolen the impression of her fantasy, With bracelets of thy hair, rings, gauds, conceits, Knachs,

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Love in "A Midsummer Night's Dream".

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM There are various types of “love” found in A Midsummer Night’s Dream”, which Shakespeare explores through the constant evolution and changing of relationships between the characters. The first of these relationships is that of the duke, Theseus, and his bride-to-be, Hippolyta. Although his enthusiasm over their wedding can be interpreted as a sign of love, it belies his actual dominating nature. He had “wooed” Hippolyta with his “sword”, and “won (her) love doing (her) injuries”. This is a clear example of how Theseus is not the righteous man he claims to be, another example of which is given in Act II Scene I: we discover that he had “ravished” Perigouna, and “broke his faith” with Aegles, Ariadne, and Antiopa for Titania. The Fairy Queen’s relationship with her husband Oberon is where we once again see male domination and female subservience, as was common in Victorian society. But in reciprocal, Ritania is depicted as a strong woman who is loyal to and cares for her friends, even if one such friend was a “votress of her order”. Oberon is, comparatively, rather shallow, bordering on cruel. Throughout the play, he shows more companionship towards his servant Robin Goodfellow than his own wife, calling her a “rash wanton”. He demands that she hand over an Indian changeling boy to be his “henchman” solely

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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