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GCSE: Shakespeare's Sonnets

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  • Marked by Teachers essays 2
  1. Examine the literary tradition of sonnet writing with particular reference to the sonnets of William Shakespeare.

    This type of sonnet consists of an octave and a sestet. The octave has a rhyming scheme of; a, b, b, a, a, b, b, a. Whilst the sestet has a rhyming scheme which usually consists of; c, d, c, d, c, d. The metre in a Petrarchan sonnet is also iambic pentameter (10 syllables per line). The Petrarchan form may also convey the topic of love, but also other emotions as in Ozymandias by Percy Bysshe Shelley, and other sonnets.

    • Word count: 2013
  2. The Dark Lady in ShakespeareŒs Sonnets.

    My mistress´┐Ż eyes are nothing like the sun, 130.1-6 Coral is far more red, than her lips red, If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun: If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head: I have seen roses damasked, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks, Therefore my mistress´┐Ż brows are raven black, 127.9-10 Her eyes so suited, ... She is not only named Dark Lady because of her dark looks, but also because of her black moral character.4 Shakespeare describes her for example as cruel and tyrannous.

    • Word count: 2989
  3. Shakespearian Love Sonnets.

    The first image of her love tells us that her love has no bounds and is as vast and great as the sea. The second comparison shows that her and Romeo's love for each other is young and undeveloped, but could really blossom if they are patient and wait. After reading the play 'Romeo and Juliet', I realised that many traditional images of love were used by Shakespeare. These traditional images of love were used throughout Elizabethan poetry. In search of more of these traditional images of love or love conventions, I decided to read three Love Sonnets written by William Shakespeare.

    • Word count: 2592
  4. Compare and contrast the two sonnets "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" and "Sonnet 130".

    does exactly this, so in a way Shakespeare contradicts himself. The poem "Shall I compare thee..." poses with the question, "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?", this opening line gives the impression that the author is going to compare his love to all the beauties of 'summers' day, but instead it follows on to say that she is more lovely and more ''temperate'' than a summery day, as a summery day has so many faults. He goes onto explain how at the start of summer the winds are rough and that they shake ''The darling buds of May'' and he complains about the short, allocated time for summer.

    • Word count: 2617
  5. From the sonnets you have studied compare and comment upon three poems, explain why you think they are successful show which you prefered and why.

    Once this is repeated five times in each line it is known as an iambic pentameter. The most famous form of sonnet is the Shakespearean sonnet and is known as this because it is the pattern that Shakespeare used for many of his sonnets. The sonnets that I have chosen are all Shakespearean and written by Shakespeare. I am going to compare three sonnets that are all by Shakespeare, which are 'Shall I compare thee...?', 'Let me not' and 'Act I Scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet'. I have selected these poems because I believe that they will make an interesting comparison, as they are all love sonnets with different purposes.

    • Word count: 2061
  6. Compare William Shakespeare’s sonnets 12 and 73, look closely at the language use to convey the writer’s realisation of death

    This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong, To love that well which thou must leave ere long. Compare William Shakespeare's sonnets 12 and 73, look closely at the language use to convey the writer's realisation of death William Shakespeare (1564-1616) wrote a group of 154 sonnets between 1592 and 1597, which were compiled and published under the title 'Shakespeare's Sonnets' in 1609. The 154 poems are divided into two groups, a larger set, consisting of sonnets 1-126 which are addressed by the poet to a dear young man, the smaller group of sonnets 127-154 address another persona, a 'dark lady'.

    • Word count: 2373
  7. Compare William Shakespeare's sonnets 12 and 73

    This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong, To love that well which thou must leave ere long. Compare William Shakespeare's sonnets 12 and 73, look closely at the language use to convey the writer's realisation of death William Shakespeare (1564-1616) wrote a group of 154 sonnets between 1592 and 1597, which were compiled and published under the title 'Shakespeare's Sonnets' in 1609. The 154 poems are divided into two groups, a larger set, consisting of sonnets 1-126 which are addressed by the poet to a dear young man, the smaller group of sonnets 127-154 address another persona, a 'dark lady'.

    • Word count: 2351
  8. Love in Romeo and Juliet and Sonnets 18, 29 and 130.

    The plot revolves around to ?star-cross?d lovers? who fall in love at first sight. Love is first expressed at the beginning of the play through the prologue of Act 1. Here, Shakespeare includes the phrase ?star-cross?d lovers? referring to two couples that are the centre point characters of the play. He is using a metaphor to get across the fact that the two lovers will have a relationship that will be thwarted by outside forces. The chances of their relationship growing into something fruitful are unlikely and in turn empower the affair the two fall in to.

    • Word count: 2304
  9. How were some sonnets used to express different views on love?

    This sonnet takes the form of a Shakespearean sonnet - the first of which were composed by Sir Thomas Wyat (1503-1542) and Henry Howard (1517-1547) ? written in iambic pentameter, containing three four-line quatrains with a strict rhyme scheme and an ending rhyming couplet. Shakespeare uses this strict form to express his love, allowing the reader to focus more on his words and message than the structure. The sonnet starts off with the question, ?Shall I compare thee to a summer?s day?? which Shakespeare then goes on to answer in great detail.

    • Word count: 2466

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?

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