Unman, Wittering and Zigo - If you were directing Scene Three, what directions would you give to the characters involved?

Unman, Wittering and Zigo If you were directing Scene Three, what directions would you give to the characters involved? Think about how you would tell them to behave, speak, move and especially how you would have John react to the news of Mr. Pelham's death. The play "Unman, Wittering and Zigo was written by Giles Cooper and was intended for radio, but was adapted for the stage. The play follows John Ebony, a new teacher in his early twenties as he deals with his new pupils, fellow staff and his restless new wife Nadia. The play concentrates on John meeting his new class and coming to terms with the fact that they claim to have killed their previous teacher. As well as dealing with his class, John encounters Cary, a fellow teacher whom he goes drinking with. He finds it hard to come to terms with Cary's attitudes to the modern world and regularly confides his doubts to Cary. John also finds it hard to live up to the everlasting demands of his wife Nadia. Scene Three is quite possibly the most important in this play, as it leads on to a lot of the event throughout the rest of the play. This is also the scene where John finds out that his class claim to of murdered Mr. Pelham, their previous teacher before John. If I was directing this scene, I would start it off with John quite formal as he takes roll, with the boys being casual as they remark on his roll call techniques.

  • Word count: 682
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Snake in the grass.

Snake in the grass Alex Rennie Jeremy walked into the cold, dark room. He flicked the switch and a small single bulb lit up over the centre of a large table. Around the table stood three other people all tall and middle aged. "Take your seats" said Jeremy. "John, Becca, and Sam, I have asked you back to the old forge because I want to pull one more job before I retire for good." Jeremy wanted to pull a last job because he was short of money. His son Howard was addicted to drugs. Howard stole Jeremy's money to fund his addiction. The old forge was where Jeremy used to meet with five other people; two of them were shot on the last robbery. The room that they are standing in used to be the boardroom for the managers of the forge. "No!" insisted Becca, "We lost two people on the last job we don't want any more friends killed." Becca walked out of the room and left the forge. She slithered into her Lotus and sped off. Becca turned onto Frenchay Road and a police car pulled up behind her. She climbed out of her car. "What seems to be the problem?" "You are arrested on suspicion of theft!" Becca's head was pushed inside of the police car. The car drove away and Becca's car was left there. The police car pulled up outside the police station. Becca was pulled out of the car and taken to the chief superintendent. "Becca, we know that you have been part of a

  • Word count: 676
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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A Beautiful Mind

A Beautiful Mind Mathematician John Forbes Nash won the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1994, after suffering 35 years from paranoid schizophrenia. His story inspired the movie A Beautiful Mind, which recently won the Oscar for Best Picture. John Forbes Nash is a mathematical genius that is described as having "two helpings of brain and only half a helping of heart". His heroic struggle with mental illness and the incredible toll that took on his marriage forms the heart and soul of A Beautiful Mind. John Nash attended Princeton University during the cold war. He was a very competitive and arrogant human being. Today Nash's theories influence global trade negotiations, and even breakthroughs in evolutionary biology. After marrying the love of his life Alicia, John is diagnosed with schizophrenia. The on set of his disease came about in as little as two weeks. The underlying point of this film was to give people a realistic view of what life is like for someone with this disease. John Nash would not have survived for as long as he has if it weren't for his loving and dedicated wife Alicia. Together thy triumphed over his disease. MSN.com has a definition for schizophrenia, which states "schizophrenia is a severe, chronic, and often disabling brain disease. While the term schizophrenia literally means, 'split mind', it should not be confused with a 'split' or multiple

  • Word count: 622
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Brave New World

What are Mustapha Mond's arguments against freedom? Is there any validity to them? Do you think there is a 'winner' of his debate with John? Mustapha Mond's arguments are mainly put across during chapter sixteen, through his debate with John. He feels that stability and conditioning are key to society. Without conditioning, there would no be stability and to him stability is paramount to create an ideal utopia. He says, 'Our world is not the same as Othello's world. You can't make tragedies without social instability. The world's stable now. People are happy; they get what they want'. This is true to a certain extent- they're well off; they're safe; they're never ill; they're ignorant of passion, etc. 'And if anything should go wrong, there's always soma'. However, it is important to consider that do they really know what happiness really is? If they are ignorant of passion they cannot feel deeply as we do. Another value at the heart of Brave New World is consumerism- the gratification of desires or appetites. This is a world that suppresses initiative and everything we hold sacred in place for consumer values. If consumption is 'happiness', Mond refers to the other value, therefore stability. From Mond's point of view, 'Happiness and stability depend on each other'. This is economic stability but emotional, social, psychological stability are created through

  • Word count: 604
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Ladies and Gentlemen: I am here today to talk about a writer, philosopher and person; Iris Murdoch.

IRIS MURDOCH Ladies and Gentlemen: I am here today to talk about a writer, philosopher and person; Iris Murdoch. Ever since her first book Sartre was published in 1953 she has been the subject of discussion and now, even after her death she's still praised, and recently a biographical film of her life (Iris) was released with Kate Winslet. Over 40 years she wrote 26 novels, the last one was published just before her death in 1999 from the memory disease Alzheimer's. OK, I'm going to need some volunteers. (get a big bloke to be Iris Murdoch and others to hold up things and explain what they are) Iris Murdoch was born in Dublin. Her mother was Irish, and had trained as an opera singer. Will John Hughes Murdoch, her father, was an English civil servant. The family moved to London, where Murdoch grew up in the western suburbs of Hammersmith and Chiswick. She studied classics, ancient history, and philosophy at Somerville College, in Oxford. During World War II she was an active member of the Communist Party. From 1938 to 1942 she worked at the Treasury as an assistant principal, and then for the United Nations relief organisation UNNRA (1944-46) in Austria and Belgium. After a year without a job in London, She took up a postgraduate studentship in philosophy. In 1948 she was elected a fellow of St. Anne's College, Oxford, where she worked as a tutor until 1963. Her first

  • Word count: 602
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Who's Irish?

Effie Rozanitis ENG 102/Cavanaugh Summary Essay January 24, 2003 Who's Irish? Who's Irish? Is a witty and relatable story of two different cultures having a common bond of a little girl, Sophie. The characters of this short story are individuals that constitute the narrators outcome. The grandmother, who is this sixty-eight year old Chinese born widow is a fierce, traditional and broken English spoken woman of certain beliefs. Her daughter Natalie, is a Chinese-American woman who like her mother is fierce is married to John Shea, a depressed, out of work man of Irish decent. Both Natalie and John have a three year old little girl, Sophie. Sophie is a smart, wild and stubborn little girl that doesn't want to listen to anyone. Along with this happy little family is Bess. Bess is John's mother, a quiet and peaceful woman that needs female company and gets along with her the other grandmother. The point of view of this story is told through the grandmother. The grandmother's disregard for the Irish is constant obstacle that she faces throughout the story. She finds that Sophie is too wild and is not "a Chinese girl I ever see" Sophie's wild streak of taking off her clothes at the park, kicking other mothers and blatantly disobeying her grandmother is a shock and thinks that it stems from Sophie's other decent of being Irish. As the story unfolds, the grandmother

  • Word count: 577
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Dear Bernard,

Dear Bernard, I remember that when I was brought to this world I was eager to embrace a way of life I neither knew nor understood, and of course I came unstuck. At first I was pleased and excited about this world that surrounded me, and I could not explain it any better that with this quotation of one of Shakespearean s works: "O brave new world that has such people in it". You know I have a firm code of conduct. My happiness - and sorrow - don't derive from taking a soul-corrupting chemical. My beliefs contradict those of this brave new world, as he shows in my fight with the system after my mother died. The words of the director keep ringing in my head: "you're claiming the right to be unhappy. Not to mention the right to grow old and ugly and impotent; the right to have syphilis and cancer; the right to have too little to eat; the right to be lousy; the right to live in constant apprehension of what may happen tomorrow; the right to catch typhoid; the right to be tortured by unspeakable pains of every kind". After I replied I wanted each of these things he replied: "You're welcome", and it was only a few seconds before my death that I was able to understand his words. By this time the denizens of your world had become infatuated with my exotic ways, and it was not long before they hunted me down, and forced me to conform to their will. You must have already got to know

  • Word count: 576
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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American Literature

Soniat, Elizabeth Ms. Hagood American Literature 22 November 2003 Finding Courage John Quincy Adams once said, "Courage and perseverance have a magical talisman, before which difficulties disappear and obstacles vanish into air." At the age of eleven I was riding horses without a fear in the world. Twice a week since I was five I had been riding, so naturally I thought it was easy and there was nothing to it. However, one day my instructor informed me that I would be learning to jump that day. My heart probably skipped a beat with both fear and excitement. It was nothing but a small pole, hardly six inches off the ground; nevertheless, my heart pounded. As I approached the pole a million thoughts went through my head, but the most important was the last one, "I'm going to do this". John Quincy Adams was right; the obstacle in front of me disappeared when I found courage. As soon as I cleared the jump I was ecstatic and wanted nothing more than to do it again. Years later I was still advancing in my riding, finding new obstacles to overcome. I now jumped three feet rather than the miniscule inches I had been so nervous about a few years ago. However, now there was a new challenge; it was raining and wet in the arena and I was attempting a higher jump than before. As I took the turn before the jump, I hardly felt anything going wrong. Suddenly I was in the mud along

  • Word count: 573
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Factfile of John Metcalf.

Name: John Metcalf also know as "Blind John of Knaresborough. Date of birth: 15th August 1717. Height: At the age of 21 John was over six foot tall. Town of birth: Knaresborough Childhood: John had smallpox at the age of 6 years this caused him to become blind. He could play the violin. Marriage: Dorothy Benson was John's wife, she was a shoemaker. John built a house for him and his wife. There Dorothy gave birth to a boy and his first daughter. Achievements: In 1754 John realised that there was a new method, which was a stone wagon. This was the start of the road building. He realised that the state of the roads were bad, so he contracted to build three miles of road, which would run from Minskip to Fearnsby. So he sold his wagon and began thirty years of road building. There were many problems like boggy land. He surveyed the land him self. Many special tools were used to help him to build his road like the viameter, which was used to measure the distances he was able to read this by touch. He constructed a total of about 180 miles and the estimated the cost to at least £65000. His roads which was built ran through: * Harrogate and Harewood bridge * Knaresborough and Wetherby * Wakefield, Huddersfield and Saddleworth (the Manchester road). * Bury and Blackburn with a branch to Accrington *

  • Word count: 561
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Brave New World. Lindas version of the New Mexican Savage Reservation incident.

Transfer-Encoding: chunked Linda’s version of the New Mexican Savage Reservation incident When we first got off the early rocket at the Savage Reservation, I was full of joy, excitement at the fact that I was finally going to see the Savage Reservation. I had heard lots of stories about the place and I was drawn in when the first story had started. What was more was that I was going with the man whom I was with at the time. It was a feeling I had never felt before in my life. I think the people here call it love. When we first arrived, we got given our soma rations- enough for 2 half-gramme tablets a day and we started following the directions of the Delta-Minuses. Seeing them there, mindlessly repeating the directions to us, made me sure that I definitely would not want to be a Delta-Minus or any class for that matter, Beta-Minus’ get the best of both worlds. We get very good jobs and Alpha’s are attracted to us. What could be better? The first message we heard from the Delta was that we were a good few miles away before we would even see the Savage. So we set off and progressed hill after hill, a tedious and laborious job. A few hours later, we finally arrived at the Savage Reservation at dusk. Nothing could have prepared us for what we saw at that moment. The building were no more than 2 stories high and most of them were huts. The place was full of dirt,

  • Word count: 561
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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