What the Mayor of Casterbridge tells us About 19th Century Wessex - Discuss

What the Mayor of Casterbridge tells us About 19th Century Wessex The plot of The Mayor of Casterbridge is slightly confusing and complex to follow, the pages of this well known novel are filled with scandal and alcohol, but provides for a very interesting and unique story. The novel is written by Thomas Hardy was a man who was very interested in agriculture and therefore was able to create a great a successful story. The story takes place in one main location, an old village created from Dorchester called Casterbridge and the other; Weydon Priors which is a smaller version of the typical market towns. The plot of the story is unusual and certainly a little out of the ordinary but still it makes a fantastic story line. Thomas hardy uses a great descriptive vocabulary of words which creates images and pictures in your mind. Hardy says and describes that the surroundings of Casterbridge are mainly tree plantations and row after row of fields planted wit corn. From the beginning, it is obvious that something is strange about this family. It was one summers evening when the three (Michael, Susan and Elizabeth-Jane) begin the voyage to Weydon-priors. Although the man, woman, and child are not poorly dressed, "..... The thick hoar of dust which accumulated on their shoes and garments from an obviously long journey lent a disadvantageous shabbiness to their appearance just

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Many would say that Michael Henchard brought all his troubles on Him self, would you agree?

English coursework Many would say that Michael Henchard brought all his troubles on Him self, would you agree? Introduction: The name Michael Henchard fits the character; it sounds like wrench hard. Henchards personality dominates the novel, some would same that henchards character is complex, it's made up of a mixture of positive and negative trails. He is a very superstitious man; he is a victim of fate. I'm a strong believer that Henchard brought all his troubles on him self, but also was not the luckiest of men either. As I go though this essay I will be picking bits out of the story to prove what I have just said. Main body To some up Michael Henchards character perfectly would be to say that he is the tragic hero of the story. This means that he was the obvious hero of the story but under tragic circumstances. There are many terms, words, and phrases that would some up Michael Henchards character perfectly; such as cruel and impulsive at times, he was a very heavy-framed man. In this part of the essay I am going to talk about how Henchard brought all his troubles on him self. In think the first thing Henchard did wrong was to sell his wife. This is one of the most important parts of the novel. They both had enough of the old village they were living in, they though it would be bad for there daughter, Elizabeth- Jane. So they moved and set out to find a clean

  • Word count: 1478
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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The mayor of casterbridge

Pre-1914 Prose Thomas Hardy: The Mayor of Casterbridge Demonstrate how, in the first two chapters of The Mayor of Casterbridge, Hardy presents a powerful image of a central character against a vivid background The book is set in the summer of around 1830, we know this because "before the 19th century had reached one-third of its span." As it was set in the 1830's the landscape would have been very different from today. This is demonstrated from the start of the book. Michael and Susan Henchard are "plainly but not ill clad" This tells us that they are not badly off. On the other hand they are covered in a "thick hoar of dust" telling us that the roads are unpaved. This also implies that although the Henchards are not badly off they cannot afford transport indicating that it is still expensive at this time. Henchard is described as "of fine figure, swarthy, and stern in aspect." His clothing is old fashioned "short jacket of brown corduroy" and a "waistcoat with white horn buttons." This "stale familiarity" between Henchard and Susan is an example of another common theme in the novel, which is that of frustrating and imprisoning relationships. This is portrayed as a normal state as she "appeared to receive it as a natural thing." Susan Henchard is carrying a baby called Elizabeth-Jane. As the Henchards continue they come across a Turnip-Hoer implying that the residents

  • Word count: 1453
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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"Discuss how the passage of time is presented in the first chapters of The Mayor of Casterbridge. What effect does it have on the characters?"

THE MAYOR OF CASTERBRIDGE. "Discuss how the passage of time is presented in the first chapters of The Mayor of Casterbridge. What effect does it have on the characters?" This essay will answer the preceding question by discussing how the key characters and places develop and are affected by the passage of time in the first few chapters of the book. The author of the book is Thomas Hardy, a very descriptive writer, although this is one of his faster paced books. It was written in the 1880's and is set in the 1830's. The book begins with Michael Henchard walking along a dusty road with his wife Susan. She is carrying a baby called Elizabeth -Jane. After getting to the fair taking place in the village Henchard becomes drunk and sells his wife. The next day he regrets what he has done and consequently swears an oath that he will not touch a drop of liquor for 21 years. At this point in the book (chapters 2-3) there is an 18 year gap in the book. The book is set in the summer of around 1830 we know this because "before the 19th century had reached one-third of its span." As it was set in the 1830's the landscape would have been very different from today. This is demonstrated from the start of the book. Michael and Susan Henchard are "plainly but not ill clad" This tells us that they are not badly off. On the other hand they are covered in a "thick hoar of dust" telling us that

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  • Word count: 1431
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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What the Mayor of Casterbridge tells us

What the Mayor of Casterbridge tells us About 19th Century Wessex The narrative of 'The Mayor of Casterbridge' is intricate and complex, making it hard to follow. The pages of this acclaimed novel are filled with scandal, but it provides for an interesting and unique story. Hardy's personal interest in agriculture and study in architecture enables him to create a great a successful and very visual story. The story is set in one main location, an old village created from Dorchester called Casterbridge and the other; Weydon Priors, a smaller version of the typical market towns. The plot of the story is unusual and certainly a little out of the ordinary but still, it makes results in a compelling story. Thomas Hardy uses an extensive descriptive vocabulary to create images and pictures in the reader's imagination. Hardy describes the surroundings of Casterbridge as mainly tree plantations and row after row of fields planted with corn. From the beginning, it is obvious that something is strange about this family. It was one summers evening when the three (Michael, Susan and Elizabeth-Jane) begin the voyage to Weydon-priors. Although the man, woman, and child are not poorly dressed, "...The thick hoar of dust which accumulated on their shoes and garments from an obviously long journey lent a disadvantageous shabbiness to their appearance just now". The first scene is works

  • Word count: 1431
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Essay describing the author's views on The Character Michael Henchard.

Essay describing the author's views on The Character Michael Henchard My first impression of the Character Michael Henchard was that he was a fool but as I read on through the book I began to respect him in some way, as he was so honourable while so many bad things were happening. The Character of Michael Henchard Strikes me as being a Tragic Hero type character and after looking at the definition of a Tragic Hero I was certain that Hardy had written that way. The Definition that I read was that "In Greek literature, a tragic hero is a well-known and respected individual whose tragedy usually involves some kind of fall from glory. His downfall has been precipitated by his own flaw of character or judgement, some mistake or series of mistakes that has serious consequences. A key element is that the hero's experiences don't simply end with the mistake or catastrophe; true tragic heroes must come to discover or recognise what has happened to them and ultimately pay their ramifications." As you can see this description fits Michael Henchard in the Mayor of Casterbridge perfectly. It is even more of a tragedy since there was so much embarrassment and scandal surrounding his fall as an important member of Casterbridge. Also at the beginning of the novel Henchard is a poor man, but he gains fortune and respect when he starts his new life in Casterbridge, giving him the

  • Word count: 1322
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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The untimely demise of Michael Henchard

Sunday, 14 October 2001 Henchard can never escape the events of his past. What do you think drives Henchard to his end? All page references are for the new windmill classics version. There are many factors which lead to the untimely demise of Michael Henchard "the Mayor of Casterbridge". Some of these factors are partly down to bad luck whereas some of the more important ones are down to the bad decisions that he makes. To find out why Henchard actually does make such devastating mistakes one has to look closely at his character. Henchard is a proud man with a short temper. This is probably the worst combination of traits possible in any man. This is because once he makes a decision he cannot possibly go back on it as this will impinge, or so he thinks, on his majestic reputation. This unforgiving nature also leads to the finalising of the deal to sell Susan and Elizabeth-Jane for five guineas. Even when Susan gives him the chance to back down when she says "Before you go further Michael, listen to me. If you touch that money, I and this girl go with the man. Mind, it is a joke no longer." (page 12) Henchard refuses to back down. I think that this is because he is in front of the crowd and greatly emboldened by the illicit rum that he drank in the furmity even though he will greatly regret it later. Another of Henchard's traits also leads to his downfall. This is his

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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In ‘The mayor of Casterbridge’ Henchard is presented as atypical tragic hero. How far do you agree with this statement?

In 'The mayor of Casterbridge' Henchard is presented as atypical tragic hero. How far do you agree with this statement? 'The mayor of Casterbridge' presents Henchard as atypical tragic hero in that he suffers and dies through his own character and a concentration of events. Firstly, he was an alcoholic; his relationship with Susan and his relationship with Elizabeth-Jane are three points, which show this. Another three are that he had an affair with Lucetta, what happened with Farfrae and fate in general. The first point, which I am going to use to show that he is typical tragic hero, is that he was an alcoholic, this played a big part at the begging of the story. As it was then that he became drunk and sold his wife, Susan and daughter, Elizabeth-Jane. "I'll sell her for five guineas to any man that will pay me the money," so he sold her to a sailor called Newson for five guineas in the furmenty tent at Weydon-Priors Fair. We see that when he gets drunk he does things, which he later regrets. We can tell this as the morning after he sells Susan he wishes that he hadn't and takes an oath not to drink again for twenty-one years. "I, Michael Henchard...take an oath...to avoid all strong liquors...for...21 years" He then goes on to complete his oath by not drinking for twenty-one years, which shows that he is a man who sticks to his principles. The second point that shows

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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Whom or what is most to blame for Henchards downfall, to what extent do you believe he was right to blame himself

Wing Kay Chan The Mayor Of Casterbridge English Coursework Whom or what is most to blame for Henchards downfall, to what extent do you believe he was right to blame himself for his own ruin? Thomas Hardy was born on June 2, 1840, near Dorchester in Dorset in Southwest England. Thomas was famous for his poets and novels. He developed his affection of music from his father and a devotion to literature from his mother. After his success in novels and poetry he died in 1928. Much of his writing in 'The Mayor Of Casterbridge' reflects his life in the countryside and his attachment to the local towns folk. One such character is Henchard, the main male in 'The Mayor Of Casterbridge; who finally becomes the mayor. At the start of the novel, we can observe Henchard as poor, fierce, ambitious and a drunk. One situation that arises which is important in this novel, which I believe is to blame for Henchard's downfall is indeed at the start. He is at the fair at Weydon Priors with Susan and baby Elizabeth Jane and he is drunk, he hastily sells his wife for 5 guineas to a sailor. However earlier on Hardy indicates that their relationship had always been week. 'The young woman his wife, who has seemed accustomed to such remarks acted as if she did not hear them.' After this point, Henchard realizes his mistake; this is how he lost Susan. Here Henchard has mixed sentiments but he does

  • Word count: 1138
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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'Short stories can be remarkably effective' this statement is proved very successful by the short story 'One of These Days' by Gabriel Garcia Marquez.

'Short stories can be remarkably effective' this statement is proved very successful by the short story 'One of These Days' by Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Marquez uses descriptive language, metaphors and various other techniques, which give 'One of These Days' its unique effect. 'One of These Days' has a gripping and effective opening making the reader want to read on. Immediately in a very short space of time Marquez introduces the main character and describes the 'warm and rainless day', which comes across as unusual and also ties in with the title! When Marquez describes the dentist, 'Aurelio Escovar' you get a very vivid image of his 'erect and skinny' appearance, without giving too much away leaving the reader asking questions. There are many themes suggested by Marquez in 'One of These Days'. A theme of importance, success and wealth is introduced when the fact that the dentist is wearing a 'gold stud' is mentioned. There is also a very opposite theme of poverty. This theme is questioned when you find out that the dentist is working 'without a degree'. This brings the reader to wonder what kind of community the dentist is living in if he is working as an unqualified dentist. Mystery and tension is added to the story when the dentist 'arranges his instruments in size order as if they were on display' giving the impression that he is a neat, particular and anxious

  • Word count: 1056
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
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