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Muliebrity- Sujata Bhatt. The writer seems unwilling to let go to the memory of this girl and that unwillingness is portrayed in several ways throughout the poem.

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Introduction

Muliebrity- Sujata Bhatt Bhatt portrays the woman character in the poem as a strong (' Power glistening through her cheekbones') woman who is not ashamed of her job as this is her means of income. The writer seems unwilling to let go to the memory of this girl and that unwillingness is portrayed in several ways throughout the poem. Firstly you notice the free verse format of the poem. ...read more.

Middle

The most effective way in which Bhatt conveys the importance of the memory to her and how unwilling she is of letting it go, is through the phrases 'unwilling to user for a metaphor for a nice image' and 'most of all unwilling to forget her or to explain to anyone the greatness...' By stating that she wont turn the girl into a metaphor for something nice (perhaps something you've seen in a tourist photo), Bhatt is emphasizing that the girls greatness is so grand that turning her into anything else would not do her justice. ...read more.

Conclusion

She may do this, perhaps, because no one else would understand the strength and greatness the girl portrays. The poet then does not write to entertain, but to put down the memory of something important to her that she can not speak aloud, for if she speaks of the memory, out it into words, her mind may put the image to rest. When she wants it to stay vivid and strong (just like the girl). ...read more.

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