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The Rocking Horse Winner

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Introduction

Toni Vargas Professor Stoddart English 102 April 13, 2009 For the Love of Money In David Herbert Lawrence's "The Rocking-Horse Winner," Paul was a young child from a money-oriented family whose personality evolved from an introverted and inquisitive little boy seeking his mother's attention to an obsession with trying to please her. Paul's mother was merely attracted to material possessions and uninterested in her offspring. She was in debt and continued to live beyond their funds. Paul was starving for love and attention from his mother and struggled to please her. He became captivated with laying a bet on horse racing and making money to satisfy his mother. Paul's obsessions with trying to gain his mother's warmth eventually lead to his downfall. D. H. Lawrence shows of the traumatic ruin of an upper middle class family stressed to maintain appearances in the face of customary overspending. The most terrible offender is the status-conscious mother because unfortunately, no matter how much capital Paul earns, her over-elaborate tastes only grows rapidly. In literature, theoretical analysis behaves as a crucial function in the understanding and critical meaning of a text. Some writers supply hidden meaning that is suitable to these theories to produce a greater density in the plot of the story. ...read more.

Middle

Through the story, it is obvious that the mother concentrates primarily on her misery in life, predominantly that she lacks all the wealth she desires. This is noticeable where she mentions to her son "I used to think I was, before I married. Now I think I am very unlucky indeed." (Kennedy 595) When Paul makes an attempt to get her to see that despite her bitterness towards her life, his outlook on luck is distinct from hers. Despite her resentment, he states at one point to her "I'm a lucky person." The mother's great denial of any opportunity of happiness though transforms the Paul's plan. In addition, the action alone unmistakably manifests the son's desire to please his egocentric mother. The son seems determined to give his mother some good luck. It was not until she was married that she claimed her bad luck began. This is apparent when her son asks her if she received anything pleasant for her birthday, which to she responds coldly "Quite moderately nice." Paul was never fully satisfied with his earnings for the reason that he felt it wasn't sufficient for his mother. Every time the house chanted, "There must be more money! There must be more money!" ...read more.

Conclusion

The cold and unloving quality of the mother is demonstrated clearly by Lawrence. "She married for love, and the love turned to dust. She had bonny children, yet she felt they had been thrust upon her, and she could not love them" (Kennedy 594). The quote creates an image of how cold the mother is towards her children. Hester stopped respecting and loving her husband, once he was unable to provide her with all her extravagant taste. Hester blames their financial failure to her "unlucky" husband. The situation made her grow bitter. Hester's priorities; obviously not the children but her greed, has made her unable to display any affection toward the children. This story critically judges those who associate love with money and luck with happiness. The mother with her insatiable desire for material possessions believes that money will make her happy despite the obvious fact that so far it has not. Paul, who learns from his mother to associate money with love, represents the desperate search for values in a cash culture. Mothers mold their sons into men who are the opposites of their undesirable husbands. Since mothers cannot change their husbands they create desirable sons. Making her feelings known the mother coldly characterizes her husband as "very unlucky". By telling Paul this she sets in motion the boy's useless mission to please her to be the man his father could not. ?? ?? ?? ?? Vargas 1 ...read more.

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