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Why is Act 1 Scene 5 an important scene in Romeo and Juliet?

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Introduction

Why is Act 1 Scene 5 an important scene in Romeo and Juliet? Act 1 scene 5 is a crucial scene in the play 'Romeo and Juliet', a tragedy by William Shakespeare. In this scene, Romeo and Juliet meet for the first time at a Capulet feast in which Romeo, a Montague, secretly enters after getting persuaded by his best friend Mercutio. Romeo initially intends to see Rosaline who he suffers unrequited love with. However, it is love at first sight when he sees Juliet. The scene develops further with both love struck teenagers conversing and gradually comes to an end as Romeo and Juliet both find out the true identity of one another; both of them are children of ever-fighting enemies, The Montague family and The Capulet family. Other characters in this scene include Capulet, Tybalt and The Nurse. Furthermore, Shakespeare has included all the themes in this scene; love, hatred, fate and family. There are five main characters in the scene, firstly there is Romeo Montague. In Act 1 Scene 5, he is displayed to be mesmerised by Juliet's beauty as he catches sight of her, he praises her beauty: "O she doth teach the torches to burn bright. It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night Like a rich jewel in an Ethiop's ear; Beauty to rich for use for earth to dear." Romeo uses a simile: 'Like a rich jewel in an Ethiop's ear' which suggests that Juliet stands out and that her beauty is superior to other women. This is shown as he uses the words 'rich jewel' which implies that he sees her as precious and very valuable. Furthermore, Romeo is shown to speak in blank verse and rhymed verse - 'bright' and 'night', which indicates him to be a higher class character. Romeo is seen enticing Juliet as he continues to praise her for her beauty; 'for earth too dear', this proves that he is in love with her and that he is a caring character as he is generous in complimenting the person whom he loves. ...read more.

Middle

Due to his actions, Tybalt is made more furious. "I would not for the wealth of all this town Here in my house do him disparagement. Therefore be patient, take no note of him; It is my will, the which if thou respect, Show a fair presence, and put off these frowns, An ill-beseeming semblance for a feast." Capulet uses the words 'my house' to show that he is in charge, also he tries to calm Tybalt down by saying 'be patient' and 'take not note of him'. Furthermore, he does not use direct imperatives to order Tybalt as he is his nephew but he does question Tybalt and his respect for him: "the which if thou respect", this shows that he expects to be respected and followed as he knows he is in charge but doesn't not want to anger Tybalt further by ordering him about. This may suggest that he cares about his family's pride, so the theme of family is represented in this scene. In Shakespeare's era, pride respect and honour were very important, therefore this is showing that Capulet doesn't want a fight at the feast as he wants to protect the family name. As he is head of the Capulet family, he is of a higher status thus meaning he talks in blank verse and rhymed verse. If I were to direct Capulet, I would have him wear royal blue clothing to represent him to be serious and important. I would have his tone stay calm and firm throughout this scene but make it change slightly to an angry tone to show his frustration at his nephew. I feel that this way the audience then and now would be able to see clearly who is in charge and important. The last main character is the Nurse. She is very close to Juliet; however she is not actually a Capulet. ...read more.

Conclusion

This may be because of his own views on how marriage and love worked or perhaps to make the play dramatic and really draw the audience in as it may relate to them or seem absurd. Furthermore, you can see that as Romeo and Juliet's love grows stronger, the hate grows as well as the tension, and ultimately this leads to the loss of many lives. Overall, Act 1 Scene 5 is a vital scene in the play, 'Romeo and Juliet' as Shakespeare answers the questions of the audience from the prologue. He has entwined all the themes into this one scene, so that you can see the contrast and perhaps guess what is to happen. The play tries to make you feel shocked and emotional as it aims to try and make you see how Romeo and Juliet feel and how they want to be together. Shakespeare makes it so that the themes get stronger from the beginning to the end. Shakespeare did this to show that love can't be where hatred exists; Romeo, Juliet and Paris die for love. Thus the young lovers' lives must have been taken to show that they died due to their fathers' hatred and need for family pride and status. Moreover, Shakespeare may have wanted to have this act as a warning; these things do happen and this is what hatred can lead to. He wants to put across the reality of life and show people what tragic things can happen and that maybe this would make them think twice as it may happen to them. All in all, the whole play could have been considered to be a metaphor - To show the futility of hatred and that it all leads to a tragic loss. Shakespeare's plays often contain a moral that tries to teach the audience, the moral for this play may have been that there is a fine line between love and hate and that either can overrule each other and can cause a tragic loss as in this play the hatred is stronger. ?? ?? ?? ?? Kirandeep Dhillon 10L ...read more.

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