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Lulworth Cove Coursework

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Lulworth Cove Geography Coursework David Hutton 10A Page Contents 2 Aims and Introduction 4 Method 6 Data Presentation 6 Data Analysis/Interpretation 14 Conclusion The management of Lulworth Cove benefits and sustains coastal environment Aims and Introduction In this coursework I am going to be exploring the advantages and disadvantages of tourism to the Lulworth area and how the management of Lulworth Cove benefits and sustains the coastal environment. The aim will be to show how the council are trying to slow down the erosion rate of the area, and if tourism has helped or has been a disadvantage to the region. While doing this, many methods were performed to get the most accurate results, as I will discuss later. Lulworth Cove is situated on the south coast of England; in the county of Dorset. It is near the village of west Lulworth which is located around 8 miles west of Weymouth on the Jurassic coast world heritage site. Lulworth Cove and its surrounding area is one of the most visited geographical sites in the world. This means that there is a vast amount of tourists visiting the region each year; over 1 million a year. ...read more.

Middle

Generally on average the same numbers of men go into the Heritage Centre every minute but pre dominantly it is the female gender that went into the heritage centre over the 5 minute period. If constantly it was the female gender going into the Heritage Centre at the highest rate it may tell me that on average females have more interest this facility more than males. Bi-Polar of Durdle Door Litter 4 Noisy 5 No Facilities 4 Un Natural 5 Dirty 5 Figure 9 - Table of results from the Bi-Polar of Durdle Door Figure 10 - Graph of the Bi-Polar of Durdle Door Figure 11 - Table of result from the Bi-Polar of Stair Hole Bi-Polar of Stair Hole Litter 5 Noisy 3 No Facilities 4 Un Natural 4 Dirty 5 Figure 12 - Graph of the Bi-Polar of Stair Hole Bi-Polar of Lulworth Cove Litter 5 Noisy 5 No Facilities 5 Un Natural 4 Dirty 5 Figure 13 - Table of results from the Bi-polar of Lulworth Cove Figure 14 - Graph of the Bi-Polar of Lulworth Cove Bi-Polar of the High Street Litter 4 Noisy 3 No Facilities 5 Un Natural 4 Dirty 5 Figure 15 - Table of results of the Bi-Polar of the ...read more.

Conclusion

Conclusion After thoroughly going through every aspect of the tourism management in Lulworth I believe that the council have managed the area in such a way that tourism and the natural environment can exist together. This is because when you look closely, you notice that they have though about the best materials to use and if they are really necessary. Although saying this I have only seen Lulworth on one particular day of the year so my theory may not be strictly true so to get a full understanding I may need to go back at different times of the year. I think our methods used were effective and reliable as they covered every topic and aspect to the best of our ability. The time in which we went to Lulworth was not peak tourist season which meant that our results may not be completely accurate. However, for the time of year we took our results, I think they are as accurate as we could have made them. One thing to improve on to get more accurate results would be to repeat these surveys and methods several times a year in different climates to get a wider range of results. ?? ?? ?? ?? Geography Coursework 1 David Hutton 10A ...read more.

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