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How did the attitudes of the Protestants develop in the 19th Century? (eg towards issues such as Home Rule)

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Introduction

History Coursework Part A Question 3:How did the attitudes of the Protestants develop in the 19th Century? (eg towards issues such as Home Rule) Since the plantations of the Protestants into Ireland in the 16th and the 17th Century, Britain had put a lot of money in Ulster to support Protestants so that the plantation project would work. ...read more.

Middle

This is why Protestants were so against Home Rule because they thought that if Home Rule was finalised the Catholics would rebel and take all the good land back and they that they would take all the good jobs because at this time the Catholics did not have very good land and there jobs were no were near as good as the Protestants jobs. ...read more.

Conclusion

After the famine many Protestant landlords evicted the Catholic tenants to increase the value of their land. So in opposition to Home rule, Protestant Orange men in the north founded the Ulster Unionist Party. The UUP had a reaction against the Home Rule proposals saying that they wanted to be ruled by Britain directly. A man called Parnell led the Home Rule Parnell. Richard Villers ...read more.

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