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Most of the sources endorse statement A 'Van Der Lubbe was a madman and he set fire to the Reichstag all by himself, but the Nazis' genuinely believed the fire was the start to a communist uprising.

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Introduction

Question 6 Broadly speaking, most of the sources endorse statement A 'Van Der Lubbe was a madman and he set fire to the Reichstag all by himself, but the Nazis' genuinely believed the fire was the start to a communist uprising. Firstly, source A which is an account by Rudolf Diels the head of the Prussian political police agrees with Statement A. The source agrees as Rudolf Diels also believes that Van Der Lubbe started the Fire alone and also that there was Communists involved. Nevertheless we still have to question the reliability of this source; first I looked at the date when this source was published which was after the second world war which was nearly 12 years after the fire took place. Therefore Diels probably would not be able to remember the incident so clearly from 12 years ago. In addition this questions the reliability of this source. Secondly, the second source which agrees with statement A is source B. ...read more.

Middle

Source F also partly agrees with statement A. This source is a piece of evidence given by Goring in which he denies any claims that he started the Reichstag fire. Source F agrees with the statement because Goring denying the charges makes Van Der Lubbe look Guilty. Overall, there are 5 sources which agree with statement A and that Van Der Lubbe started the Reichstag Fire. Also many of the sources endorse statement B 'The Reichstag Fire was started by the Nazis to give them an excuse to take emergency powers and lock up or kill the communists. Van Der Lubbe was used by the Nazis.' The first source which agrees with statement B is source A. this source agrees because in this source Rudolf Diels believed that Van Der Lubbe was not helped by communists so maybe the Nazis did 'the voluntary confessions of Van Der Lubbe made me believe he had acted alone.' Also this source agrees because Diels is attempting to distance himself from the Nazis 'I said to a colleague, "This is a madhouse".' ...read more.

Conclusion

This source agrees because Van Der Lubbe is yet again involved with the fire. Nevertheless we still have to question the reliability of this source as the Communists were the publishers of this and may have exaggerated to make it look as though the Nazis were behind the fire as it says 'we would be serving the Fuhrer'. This again backs up statement B as this source shows that the Nazis were behind the fire after all. After analysing all of the sources I have found that 5 sources agree with statement B proving that he Nazis were behind the fire and Van Der Lubbe was involved with the fire. Finally after comparing all of the sources I have came to a final conclusion that Statement A is backed up further than Statement B. My reasons for this are that many of the sources blame Van Der Lubbe and he himself actually admitted setting fire to the building alone. Sophie Scott Question 6 ...read more.

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