• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

GCSE: Law

Browse by

Currently browsing by:

Meet our team of inspirational teachers

find out about the team

Get help from 80+ teachers and hundreds of thousands of student written documents

  • Marked by Teachers essays 26
  1. Marked by a teacher

    Magistrates - Explain the role that magistrates play in the criminal justice system

    5 star(s)

    All summary cases are heard by magistrates. A triable either way case can be heard in a magistrate's court or in the crown court if the offence is deemed too serious. A magistrate will conduct what is known as mode of trial hearings for either way cases, which is where they decide whether the case will be heard by magistrates or by judge and jury. If the offence is considered serious enough to require a harsher sentence than 6 months prison/�5000 fine, then it will be heard in the crown court.

    • Word count: 1305
  2. Marked by a teacher

    Describe the powers the Police have to stop and search and arrest individuals

    4 star(s)

    If people have difficulty understanding English, or if they are deaf, then the police have to take reasonable steps to ensure that they understand their rights. A 'stop' is when a Police officer stops an individual and asks them to account for themselves. That is, if they ask the individual to tell them: what they are doing, why they are in an area, where they are going, or what they are carrying. Due to the Stephen Lawrence Report where the Police were said to be 'institutionally r****t', the officer must fill in a form saying why they were stopped and the individual must be given a copy (Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984- PACE, Section 3).

    • Word count: 1261
  3. Marked by a teacher

    Distinguish Criminal law from Civil law in the English Legal System. Outline the jurisdiction and composition of the courts of trial dealing with these two different types of cases.

    4 star(s)

    Criminal and civil cases are dealt with in different courts of trial. There are two courts for criminal cases, the magistrate's court and the crown court. In a magistrates court lay magistrates hear most cases normally in groups of three. Lay magistrates are part time, unpaid and do not need a legal qualification, however they are assisted by a legally qualified clerk who may advise if requested. Some, but very few cases may be heard by District |Judges. District judges are legally qualified, full time and paid, they sit alone and hear the longer and more difficult cases.

    • Word count: 1692
"
Law affects you on a daily basis although you might not realise it; from the quality of goods you are sold in shops to the relationship you have with your mobile phone provider! GCSE Law gives you an excellent grounding and insight into the Law of the United Kingdom and involves the study of the legal system, how it has developed over time and the roles and responsibilities of those who work within it. It also includes investigating the law in action such as criminal law, contract law, consumer law and human rights. You’ll develop a wide knowledge of the law in its many forms and you’ll pick up valuable skills of interpretation and analysis. Once you’ve built this knowledge you’ll be asked to begin applying it to other contexts and situations. Assessment is examination based at the end of the course and you’ll need to be able to express yourself very well in order to concisely apply what you have learnt. Marked by Teachers has over 400 Law GCSE essays which you can access and learn the successful techniques that examiners will be looking out for.
"

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • In relation to the offence of murder discuss the suggestion that the law is in urgent need of reform

    "In conclusion, it would seem that there is not an urgent need of reform even though there are possible faults at present with ambiguity. Also the uncertainty of intent and that there is no discrimination between these intentions do require clarification and perhaps considered as manslaughter. The law in relation to murder has worked for hundreds of years and as with all law has constantly been adapted."

  • Discuss how successful the courts have been in defining intention.

    "In conclusion, the explanation of foresight of consequences in Nedrick, where appropriate, are relevant to all offences and not just murder. The Criminal Law now states that a consequence is intended when it is the purpose of the accused. A court or jury may also infer that a consequence is intended, though it is not desired, when the consequence is a virtually certain result of the act and when the accused knows that it is a virtually certain consequence. This area of law has proved to be confusing to both juries and judges due to the uncertainty of precedent. As the law stands today it appears to have reached a decision of virtually certain but as before is not certain to remain."

  • Briefly describe the other main forms of Alternative Dispute Resolutions and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of ADR as a form of dispute resolutions.

    "My final conclusion is that I think Alternative Dispute Resolutions are a very good way of solving disputes without court action but I feel they are more successful in certain circumstances. For instance I think that family disputes are better to be solved with Alternative Dispute Resolutions. Family dispute's are better with Alternative Dispute Resolutions as then it means that the family can keep a better relationship and the whole process isn't as hostile. Individual vs Companies I would say is better to be solved in court. This is because in these cases, businesses may have prior legal connections making it unfair for the individual to get a just result."

Marked by a teacher

This document has been marked by one of our great teachers. You can read the full teachers notes when you download the document.

Peer reviewed

This document has been reviewed by one of our specialist student essay reviewing squad. Read the full review on the document page.

Peer reviewed

This document has been reviewed by one of our specialist student document reviewing squad. Read the full review under the document preview on this page.