• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Number Grid.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Number Grid. Using the following rule: find the product of the top left and bottom right number in a square. Do the same thing with the bottom left and top right. Calculate the difference. Investigate. To start this investigation I used a number grid from which I could take a box out and use to find the differences. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 ...read more.

Middle

85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 This grid contains one variable, The fact that the box, contained inside the grid is a square. For each example I will show that I worked out the differences both by using the existing maths I knew and by using a formula, which I devised. Existing Maths/Multiplication. 13 ? 22 = 286 12 ? ...read more.

Conclusion

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 For this example I used a 4 ? 4 square. This could be classed as changing a variable but it is not as it is changing the value of a variable. Multiplication 17 ? 44 = 748 14 ? 47 = 658 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Number Stairs, Grids and Sequences section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Number Stairs, Grids and Sequences essays

  1. Number Grid Investigation.

    z ( n - 1 )� So, if for example we were given a 3 X 3 square taken from a 9 wide grid the calculation would be: 9(3-1)�. For 3 X 2, 4 X 2, 5 X 2 etc...

  2. Maths - number grid

    I am now going to continue my investigation by increasing again to a larger square. Furthering my investigation I will now continue on and increase my square size to 4x4 as I did in chapter one, this is to help me come to an overall formula.

  1. number grid

    right number and the bottom left number in any 2 X 4 grid inside a 10 X 10 grid will always be 30. Now I will draw a 2 X 4 grid to test if my theory is correct. 71 72 73 74 81 82 83 84 71 x 84

  2. Mathematical Coursework: 3-step stairs

    15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1. 1+2+3+13+14+25= 58 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 109

  1. number grid investigation]

    I will now investigate to check if all examples of 5x5 grid boxes demonstrate this trend in difference. I will conduct this research using another 2 of these boxes from the overall cardinal10x10 number grid. My predication also seems to be true in the cases of the previous 2 number boxes.

  2. number grid

    = 160 When finding the general formula for any number (n), both answers begin with the equation n2+44n, which signifies that they can be manipulated easily. Because the second answer has +160 at the end, it demonstrates that no matter what number is chosen to begin with (n), a difference of 160 will always be present.

  1. Algebra Investigation - Grid Square and Cube Relationships

    Although it is quite certain that this trend would be observed in all number boxes of this instance, it is necessary to find an algebraic formula to prove that the difference remains invariable. Any 5x5 square box on the 10x10 grid can be expressed in this way: n n+1 n+2

  2. Number grid Investigation

    78 79 80 88 89 90 98 99 100 78 x 100 = 7800 98 x 80 = 7840 7840 - 7800 = 40 The difference is always 40 in a 3x3 box. After proving and verifying 4 times that 3x3 box in a 10x10 grid difference is 40, I

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work