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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Maths
  • Word count: 1172

statistics coursework

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

image00.png

Introduction

Investigation between key stage 2 results and IQ

I will investigate if higher Key Stage 2 has an affect on IQ. I am going to collect IQ and Key Stage 2 Maths Results randomly. I am going to get the data for this investigation from the Mayfield High School folder. I choose this source of information because reliable as it is the only data the school gave me, it was easy to get and it is easy to use. Any data that is missing or anomalous I will delete. I will use a total sample size of 30 if there are not enough results I will use all of them.

I will use this data to establish if there is a relation ship between IQ and Key Stage 2 Result

...read more.

Middle

Level 2     -     76.17647

Level 3     -     93.36667

Level 4     -     101.2

Level 5     -     110.9

Level 6     -     119.15789

Overall     -     100.36592

Cumulative Frequency Tables

Level 2

IQ

Frequency

Cumulative Frequency

66 – 70          

///                          

3

71 – 75          

//////

9

76 – 80          

///

13

81 – 85          

/        

14

86 – 90          

///

17

Level 3

IQ

Frequency

Cumulative Frequency

76 – 80

/

1

81 – 85

/

2

86 – 90

//////////

12

91 – 95

///////

19

96 – 100

//////

25

101 – 105

/////

30

Level 4

IQ        

Frequency

Cumulative Frequency

86 – 90    

/

1

91 – 95    

//

3

96 – 100

////////////

15

101 – 105

//////////

25

106 – 110

////

29

111 – 115

/

30

Level 5

IQ

Frequency

Cumulative Frequency

96 – 100

/

1

101 – 105

/////

6

106 – 110  

///////////

17

111 – 115

///

20

116 – 120

//////////

30

Level 6

IQ

Frequency

Cumulative Frequency

106 – 110

////

4

111 – 115

//

6

116 – 120

/////

11

121 – 125

11

126 – 130

///////

18

131 – 135

/

19

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To extend my research I am going to do the extension. In the following research I am going collect the IQ for level 3 in Key Stage 2, Year 7 and Year 11 to compare the set of results. I will

...read more.

Conclusion

In the first section of the coursework I had to investigate if Key Stage 2 Results has an effect on your IQ. The graphs and the data show that they have a positive correlation between them that means as one goes higher the other one goes higher as well.

The first extension I had to investigate if the tests are getting harder or easier from year 7 up to year 11. The graphs and the data show that the tests get harder from year 7 – 11.

The second extension was to show which gender is smarter then the other. My graphs show that the boys are smarter then the girls. The girls have a lower minimum IQ and the Boys also have a higher maximum IQ.

...read more.

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