Explain how the Sermon at Sarnath contains the key teaching of Buddhism.

Explain how the Sermon at Sarnath contains the key teaching of Buddhism. The Buddha's first sermon is imperative as it outlines the major teachings of Buddhism; he explains what he has discovered in terms of the four truths. His sermon began by explaining to the ascetics that he has found through his personal experiences that both a life of pleasure seeking and of denial of pleasure was harmful and furthermore was enlightened to see a new way of life, which was that of moderation, the middle path. This discovery enabled him to see clearly the four truths. The middle path is the concept which all Buddhist must both learn bust also become intuitive, it is the concept of avoiding extremes, this is outlined in the sermon " To indulgence of pleasure in the objects of sensual desire... and there is devotion of self torment to discover nibbana... one avoids both extremes." This belief is fundamental to Buddhism as it provides a basis of all moral and ethical decisions. The first Nobel truth is a statement that there is something fundamentally wrong with how humans see life and existence. The word used to explain the Buddhist teaching of dukka is 'suffering' yet the understanding of this is far beyond the limitations of the English word. Buddha describes it in his first sermon in Benares as "Birth is suffering, ageing is suffering, sickness is suffering, death is suffering,

  • Word count: 1230
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Describe Buddhist teachings about how people should treat the environment and animals

R.E Buddhism Coursework - Part A Describe Buddhist teachings about how people should treat the environment and animals At the moment there are many terrible things going on in the world which are caused by the fault of humans and the way they treat the environment. For example the rain forests over the world have dramatically decreased in size due to the fact that humans continue to chop it all down, whilst knowing that rain forests are essential for oxygen. Also by chopping down the rain forests many different species of plants and animals are being wiped out. Buddhists are very against anything to do with harming the environment. Buddhists would never get involved with anything to do with harming the environment, for example you would never find a Buddhist helping or even justifying chopping down the rainforests. They do everything they can to preserve the earth that they are so grateful to live on. Another aspect of the environment is that humans are harming is by polluting the world. The main factors that are polluting the world are factories and vehicles. This is a quote by W.O Cole "Modern Buddhists believe that being socially involved to protect our environment simply neglecting, destroying and polluting our planet will result in people living on a neglected and polluted planet because of the Laws of Karma" Buddhists are also very keen to keep the environment

  • Word count: 1223
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Buddhism and Buddhist teachings.

GCSE RE Coursework: Buddhist 2002 All Buddhist have an aim in life and that's to reach enlightenment and escape samsara (the cycle of death and rebirth.) To do this they have to follow certain rules and teachings, which affect their daily life in many ways, for example their diet, Buddhists aren't aloud to eat after midday. The numbers 3,3,4,4,5,8 and 10 may seem like a long list of numbers but in fact these numbers help me to remember the Buddhists teachings and beliefs... 3 stands for the three signs of life. Every Buddha wants to escape samsara the cycle of death and rebirth. To do this they must cope with the three signs of being, Dukkha, Annicca and Anatta. Dukkha means 'suffering' everyone has to suffer to succeed in something, it means more than just pain. Being uncomfortable or even bored. "Nothing in life is perfect and the Buddha said that no one can escape dukkha" meaning everyone has to suffer sometime in their lives, for example, losing a relative or close friend and no one can escape this happening to themselves or anyone else. Annicca means everything changes, for example, humans change, plants change and animals change, nothing lasts, and Buddhists believe that there is no rest except nirvana. Anatta means no soul. Buddhists believes that you don't own your soul your soul owns you. In other words your soul owns you until you gain enlightenment and

  • Word count: 1140
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Describe The Social and Religious Conditions of India When Gautama The Buddha Was Teaching.

Describe The Social and Religious Conditions of India When Gautama The Buddha Was Teaching (33) Siddharta Gautama was born in North East India around the 6th century BCE. This was a time of great prosperity. The area was very fertile and much of the land remained forested ready for cultivation. There was a great trade in agriculture and there were many merchants. This prosperity brought peacefulness. There was a very structured civilisation with a caste system. Due to the prosperity there was a much more complex society. People had time to discuss life and religion without upsetting anyone. Unlike England and America in the past when people could be tried as 'witches' for the most minor of incidents. Especially in the main towns there was a much wider range of people; merchants, businessmen, nobles, teachers, intellectuals, musicians, actors dancers, and even prostitutes. There were quite a few religions around at the time of the Buddha's teaching. The oldest was the Vedic tradition; this was the main religion, It came with the Aryans when they moved into India around 1500 BCE. The Aryans influenced Indian society a lot, and it is believed the caste system came from the Aryans. The caste system had four levels; The Brahmins who were the priests and considered closest to God, the Vaishyas who were usually soldiers and civil servants, the Shudras who were the servants and

  • Word count: 1076
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Explain How a Buddhist Might Put These Teachings Into Practice In His Or Her Daily Life

Explain How a Buddhist Might Put These Teachings Into Practice In His Or Her Daily Life The Buddhist principle of the oneness of self and environment (esho funi) means that life (sho) and its environment (e) are inseparable (funi). Funi means "two but not two." This means that although we perceive things around us as separate from us, there is a dimension of our lives that is one with the universe. At the most fundamental level of life itself, there is no separation between ourselves and the environment. "Like the Buddha, we too should look around us and be observant, because everything in the world is ready to teach us. With even a little intuitive wisdom we will be able to see clearly through the ways of the world. We will come to understand that everything in the world is a teacher. Trees and vines, for example, can all reveal the true nature of reality. With wisdom there is no need to question anyone, no need to study. We can learn from Nature enough to be enlightened, because everything follows the way of Truth. It does not diverge from Truth." (Rajah Cha) Buddhists must also beware of getting ill as there are so many medicines that are tested on animals. Buddhists cannot take such medicines as they do not wish to harm animals and they follow "right intention" by abstaining from anything that could possibly hurt the environment or any animals. A Local Buddhist

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Buddhism and Buddhist teachings.

GCSE RE Coursework: Buddhist 2002 Siddatha Gotama also known as the Buddha, is the person that all Buddhists look up to, they follow his teachings and try to achieve enlightenment just like he did. On Siddathas travels he came across a sick man, a dead man, a poor man and a holy man these are called the four sights. Siddatha was very disturbed by the sights and decided to give up everything, his family his house and his money just to find the answer to these problems. After six years spent with teachers and monks Siddatha gained enlightenment. Many Buddhists are inspired by this and are also willing to give up everything for their beliefs. All Buddhist have an aim in life and that's to reach enlightenment and escape samsara (the cycle of death and rebirth) To do this they have to follow certain rules and teachings which affect their daily life in many ways, for example their diet, Buddhists aren't aloud to eat after midday. In order to reach enlightenment and go to Nirvana Buddhist's have to follow the eight fold path, a list of eight teachings, here are a few as followed: "Right speech, a Buddhist will avoid lying, gossiping and swearing. They will try not to cause any harm through what they say to others." An example to this would be if a Buddhist were to ask for their life to end this would cause them bad karma. "Right Action, don't harm any living being including

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Analyse the pencil and explain how it might be applied to a persons employment.

Guy Mitchell Tuesday, 11 March 2003 Analyse the pencil and explain how it might be applied to a persons employment The Pancil consists 5 basic guidelines on how a Buddhist should construct there life. They are not rules but merely guidelines and pointers to help a Buddhist on his / her way to enlightenment. The Pancil is fundamental to the Buddhist teaching on morality (sila) and supports way of morality in the noble eightfold path. Right speech is one is one of the precepts. Right livelihood is fulfilled tough observing the guidelines of the Pancil. I am now going to analyse the Pancil and show how it can be applied to a person's employment. Each precept has a positive quality to be developed as well as a negative condition which is to be avoided. I undertake to abstain from taking life, in basic form this means not to kill. This would out rule a job in the army or arms manufacturing also working for a company that supplied either of those would be out. Taking life also can mean making someone's life un-enjoyable this can be applied to someone's job so that they make sure that any one below them has got fair pay and equal rights also that they should not have a job in a company works in a way that upsets other people. The positive side of this is By deeds of loving kindness I purify my body. This means that a Buddhist should try and help others to give other life

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Buddhists are taught to understand that everything in life happens for a purpose and all actions have consequences.

Buddhists are taught to understand that everything in life happens for a purpose and all actions have consequences. This can also be in relation to the environment and animals. Karmic consequences result in karma being collected through all actions in a Buddhists life, good or bad. Buddhists believe in reincarnation and that the karma you collect in this life will play a major role in the outcome of your next. If a Buddhist harmed the environment or animals they would collect bad karma resulting in a life of ignorance, suffering and possibly a lower rebirth. Reincarnation demonstrates we have all been animals in our past lives from being reborn time and time again. Potentially we could have been related to all beings, animal or human. These beliefs would have a definite influence on how Buddhists treat animals. Animals around them could be creatures they have loved and cared for and by harming them or treating them unjustly, Buddhists may be being disrespectful to beings they once cherished. Reincarnation also alters Buddhist views on the environment. They believe we depend on the world for survival, not and in the future. If they destroy, damage and harm the environment now they will only have to suffer a bad life next time round as consequence of their own actions. Engaged Buddhism is when the teachings of Buddhism are applied to the lives of Buddhists. This relates to

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Select, describe and explain the events in the life of Siddatta Gautama which illustrate his religious development.

. Select, describe and explain the events in the life of Siddatta Gautama which illustrate his religious development. Siddatta Gautama, who became the Buddha or 'the enlightened one' was born about 560 BC and died at the age of eighty. He was the founder of the Buddhist religion. Siddatta lived in north-eastern India, an area which followed the Hindu religious tradition, which was, in those days a great variety of Indian traditions and practices. Indian society was then divided up by the Hindu caste system. The highest caste were the Brahmins or priests, with the next caste down being the Kshatriyas, who were rulers or soldiers. Siddatta was born in a place called Lumbini, into the Shakya clan. He was a prince, and was therefore in the Kshatriyas caste. The story of his birth to Queen Maya, wife of Raja Shuddhodana of the Kingdom of Kapilavastu, said that his mother had a dream that eight Brahmins or priests said was a good omen. They said the child would be holy and achieve perfect wisdom. When Siddatta was born, he was born out of the side of his mother and he immediatley took seven steps towards each quarter of heaven, and at each of these steps sprung up a lotus flower. Siddatta's mother died seven days after his birth, and his aunt brought him up. There is a tradition that a seer predicted that Siddatta would become a great religious leader. His father tried to stop

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Describe Buddhist teachings about how people should treat the environment and animals

Describe Buddhist teachings about how people should treat the environment and animals Buddhism is known as a peaceful religion which treats humans and animals as equals. As a result of this, many Buddhists are vegetarians whom also embrace a kind attitude towards nature. Buddhist teachings give the basic moral teachings of life, which are then incorporated into their actions towards animals. These teachings include The Four Noble Truths and the Eight Fold Path. The Eight Fold Path compromises of eight aspects to further morality and mental training. All of these can be applied, in some way, in Buddhists treatment towards the environment and animals. Right Intention, Right Livelihood, Right Action and Right Mindfulness are four key aspects of the Eight Fold Path and can be taken further to examine how Buddhists should treat the environment and animals. Right Intention is thinking and reasoning in situations. If the action is wrong, at least the intention is still there. With Right Intention, a Buddhist is able to intend helping the environment: thus, the motive is there. This is then carried forward through Right Action. Right Action helps guide a Buddhist and states: "do not destroy life." Some people inadvertently tread on insects or kill insects without realizing, but a buddhist must try hard not to do so. This has become such a problem, that one group of

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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