Buddhist Worship - Temples and Symbols

Buddhist Temples Buddhist Temples are found all over the world. They are built in large numbers in China, Japan and all over Asia. They comprise monks and nuns who live a rather extreme lifestyle. They live on donations by the people living near the temple. A conventional temple will have a set of buildings. Each building has its own purpose. These are: Buddhist Temples Symbolise 5 things: . Fire 2. Water 3. Earth-symbolised by the square base. 4. Water 5. Wisdom Sadafha Gatarma: Sadafah Gatarma is often referred to as Buddha. He was the founder of Buddhism. Sadafah was a prince in Lumbini(Nepal). He was the prince of the Shakya Clans village of Kapilavatthu/kapilvastu (in the foothills of the Himalayas). Sadafah married at the age of 29 and had a wife and a child. However when he discovered the difference between a life of aristocratic luxury and life of suffering he left his family, wealth, power and inheritance. After six years, around 528 BC, he believed the practices did not lead to greater understanding into the purpose of life. He abandoned them and concentrated on meditation. This enlightenment is called a state of "Bodhi," this lead to the name: "Buddha," or "enlightened one." The Buddha emphasized that he was not a moral god or any supernatural force and that there are no messengers of a god-prophets-and that enlightenment . For the remaining 45

  • Word count: 859
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Select and explain the religious teachings and beliefs that might influence Buddhists in their daily lives

Collette Lewis GCSE RE Coursework: Buddhist 2002 Question 1: Select and explain the religious teachings and beliefs that might influence Buddhists in their daily lives Through doing my research in order to answer this question I found out that there are many different teachings and beliefs that might influence Buddhists in their daily lives. Firstly there is the life of Siddhartha Gotama. He had a 'perfect' life with everything you could want, money, a wife, a child power etc. However as we know nothing is ever perfect and he felt something was missing. When he visited the city to search for the meaning of life he saw four sites. An old man, a sick man, a dead man and a holy man. The only man who looked happy was the holy man and all he had were the rags he was wearing and his bowl. Sid then became and ascetic and gave up all his luxuries in life. He learnt great control of himself and his mind but through being an ascetic he became weak and unwell and so he followed the eight fold path, the middle way. While sitting under a Bodhi tree he accepted his first meal and meditated. He gradually gained insight to human nature and perfect peace. He had reached enlightenment and became known as the Buddha. The Buddha then taught others how to live a good life by teaching them three main things. The Three Marks Of Existence, The Four Noble Truths and The Eightfold Path. The

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Buddhism and Buddhist teachings.

??????? I think that all of the Buddhist teachings affect them in their daily lives but some affect them more than others. The first teaching that affects their lives is the three marks of existence. These are: * Dukka - all life is suffering, * Anicca - everything changes, * Anatta - there is no soul. Through Dukka Buddhists accept that we have to suffer in life. They are aware that even if they are not suffering themselves, someone somewhere in the world will be suffering at that moment in time. They accept that it's inevitable that they will suffer from things like illnesses, loss of a relative and eventually death. This helps them understand why they must reach enlightenment as this is the only place where they will experience true joy and stop suffering. This will also give them an incentive in life to gain more good Karma and meditate so that they can reach enlightenment. Through Anicca Buddhists learn to accept that all life changes. This shows them that they have to move on from bad experiences and not think about what could have been. This will help them because they won't be yearning for what they can't have. For example if they can't get the job they wanted they will learn to make the most of the job they do have. Change can also be physical, and they will learn not become obsessed with the fact their bodies are ageing and they will accept and be happy with

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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The Buddhas life of poverty was more important for his enlightenment, than his life of riches Do you agree or disagree with this statement?

Assessment Question: 'The Buddha's life of poverty was more important for his enlightenment, than his life of riches' Do you agree or disagree with this statement? Some people think that the Buddha's life as a rich prince was more important for his enlightenment, than his life as a poor man. When the Buddha was born a fortune teller paid a visit to the palace informing the king that his son, Siddhartha Gotama, will grow up to be either a holy man or a king. His father wanted Siddhartha to become a king, so he locked him the palace and didn't allow him to go outside so he would never be able to become a holy man. Siddhartha had everything he wanted, but he still was not happy. His life as a rich prince was important because he understood that having everything you want does not bring happiness, and made him curious as to why he was still unhappy, which allowed him to start his mission in finding out the route to happiness. Siddhartha told his chariot driver to take him outside secretly. Siddhartha went outside four times, and saw four things. On the first three trips, he saw sickness, old age and death, which his chariot driver told him no one can escape from. This was important, because it shows that even though Siddhartha was rich, he still can't escape suffering. On his fourth trip, he saw a wandering monk who had given up everything he owned to seek an end to suffering,

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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give account of the social and religious conditions in northern India at the time of the Buddha.

Give an account of the social and religious conditions in northern India at the time of the Buddha. In the time of the Buddha economic developments began to increase . the introduction of iron plough shares and other tools produced agriculture surpluses which led to prosperity and strong trade. The period is characterised by the growth of large towns and the first use of money. one of the main effects of these changes was the creation of new professions, such as trade officials and traders, which had no place in the ancient class system. Life in northern India improved at this time. Population increased dramatically at this time and also the economic growth increase. Nuns and monks depended on ordinary people to help them for food and equipment. It is therefore arguable that urban development was pre-condition for the growth of Buddhist monasteries. People still believed in the four casts although many people did start to take less notice of the casts due to his teachings, but there were still the poor and the rich and there was plenty of poverty and suffering and many men devoted there life to faiths mainly Buddhism due to the impact of the Buddha. The status of women was still unclear. Socially a women's was would be determined by her birth just as for men and she would marry in her class. However women did not directly wield power politically and it is possible women

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Buddhism is among one of the largest and oldest religions in the world.

BUDDHISM Buddhism is among one of the largest and oldest religions in the world. Buddhism originated in India and is based on the teachings of Buddha or the Enlightened One. It is believed that Buddha lived somewhere around 563 and 483 BC. Buddha was an Indian philosopher who was born in Lumbini, Nepal. Buddha was the son of the head of the Sakya warrior caste. It is hard to determine what the truth is about Buddha and his life but it is generally accepted that Buddha, at young age showed interest and took part in meditation and reflection on life; this caused his father to be unhappy as he wanted Buddha to be a warrior and leader, like him. Buddha was blinded of the reality of life and lived luxuriously but as time went on he came to realize that his life was dull and he set out in search of enlightenment. Approximately 533 BC, Buddha met an aged man, a sick man and a corpse; from his discovery he came to realize that human life is full of suffering and pain. Later he met a monk who was calm and wise. Upon meeting the monk Buddha decided to give up family, wealth and power in order to find the truth. This was a turning point in Buddhism that is referred to Great Renunciation; this is a celebrated event as the turning point in history. Buddhism is divided into two major parts, Theravada which is the way of the elders and Mayahana which refers to Hinayana, the lesser

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Consider the factors which have contributed to the establishment of various forms of Buddhism in the west.

a) Consider the factors which have contributed to the establishment of various forms of Buddhism in the west. Buddhism has many different traditions that have been adopted by and adapted for life in the west. Buddhism became popular in the west for several different reasons, for example, aspects of contemporary scientific thinking are more easily appropriated into a religion that has no God. Philosophers questioned the validity of Christianity and the Bible's historical authenticity. Furthermore the role of Charles Darwin's theory of evolution meant that Biblical criticism flourished. Additionally travel around the world was popular especially as the British Empire spanned almost one third of the eastern world was very appealing. Buddhism is undogmatic and imposes no ritual or other requirements; this means that it can be easily adapted in a multi-cultural society. Moreover Buddhist meditation techniques and the emphasis on personal development reinforce the ethic of individual attainment and self-help found in many modern west countries, also Buddhism has a modern approach to ethical dilemmas. Buddhism attracts westerners by offering something that will accommodate the needs of everyone; new Buddhist groups emerged especially suited for western society. The Friends of the Western Buddhist Order was founded in Britain in 1967 by an Englishman called Venerable

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Hinduism VS. Buddhism

Megan Webster 01/10/11 Updike Global Studies Hinduism vs. Buddhism Religion is one of the most controversial subjects. Throughout the ages people have fought and died for it. But what are they fighting about? Their differences? Well of course they have those, but the one thing that is sometimes over looked is that their similarities outweigh their differences. An example of these different yet so similar religions is Buddhism and Hinduism. The concepts and morals of the religions parallel each other, but the details are unbalanced. To better understand their beliefs, we must know their histories. Hinduism is the world's oldest religion, and one of its more mysterious ones. For many hundreds of years there has been a search for who founded Hinduism and when it even came into place. Even the authors of its sacred texts are widely unknown. We know of many Gurus, Rishis, saints, and leaders who have reformed and revived the culture, but that is really it. We also know that Hinduism developed out of Brahmanism. There is no single founder of Hinduism and it existed from time unexplored, as a religion. Hinduism is open to interpretation, and is a collection of a path to wisdom. Though its history we know little of, its future is bright. Hinduism is the third largest religion in the world, after Christianity and Islam. It has about 950 million followers, or 14% of the world's

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Explain how Buddhist teachings affect believer's attitudes and the environment When first looked at Buddhism seems a world-denying religion. Nirvana is outside of this world and the principles of dukkha, anicca

Explain how Buddhist teachings affect believer's attitudes and the environment When first looked at Buddhism seems a world-denying religion. Nirvana is outside of this world and the principles of dukkha, anicca and anatta could be said to reinforce this belief. About a thousand years after the Buddha dies, a theory of creation did emerge. This theory said the world would always evolve only to be destroyed, this is an on-going cycle and there is no creator of the Earth. And because of this on-going cycle, there is no meaning to the created world. Ergo a Buddhist's aim should be to reach Nirvana and not be reborn into the world again. The world is seen as an obstacle that prevents people from reaching Nirvana "How can there be laughter, how can there be pleasure, when the whole world is burning?"1 Many people during the time of the Buddha reached enlightenment. However in modern day society, the process to reach nirvana is much longer. And for this reason attitudes towards the world have changed so that they are more positive. It was believed that there are six destinies open to us these being, humans, animals, ghosts, gods, demons and demi-gods. These were known as gatis. In each of these gatis there were many different lives. This idea is shown in the wheel of life. It was also believed that if an animal became extinct, it was nothing to be sad about, as it was all part of

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Explain how a Buddhist might put these teachings into practise in his or her daily life

R.E Buddhism Coursework - Part B Explain how a Buddhist might put these teachings into practise in his or her daily life There are many teachings in Buddhism that Buddhists may try to follow in daily life. For example a Buddhist in the five precepts it states that we should not harm any living beings. For instance, it is believed in Buddhism to be wrong to harm animals and the environment. The Buddha said: "Life is dear to all beings. They have the right to live the same as we do." We should respect all life and not kill anything. Killing ants and mosquitoes is also breaking this precept. We should have an attitude of love and kindness towards all beings, wishing them to be happy and free from harm. Taking care of the earth, its rivers and air is included. There are many ways Buddhists might try to carry out this precept in daily life, for example they may become a vegetarian to refrain from eating meat. This precept also limits the amount of careers available to a Buddhist, as they can not have a livelihood such as a butcher. They might consider a job like a gardener, but could not work in an animal testing laboratory or become a vet. Buddhists might also try to wear appropriate clothing, for example they might not wear leather as a cow had been harmed making it. They may also not feel comfortable wearing woollen clothing as it has come from a sheep. Buddhists will

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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