Puja: Buddhism

R.s homework- Puja . Describe a typical Buddhist Temple. Modern temples are usually very bright and colourful, with three main features. There will be a shrine room with a main Buddha image and many other images, either statues or wall paintings telling the story of the Buddha's life. There are also gigantic statues of the Buddha to make him look massive. Horns may be blown; there may be the chanting of mantras over and over again. The robes are richly coloured. There may be candles, both in front of the images and around the shrine room. There may also be incense burning. Tibetan Buddhists use prayer wheels. Mantras are written out on paper and tucked into prayer wheels. Small prayer wheels are carried in the hand. Larger ones are fixed and people turn them with their hand as they pass, reciting a mantra. A temple is made up of a few different buildings. Firstly there is the temple itself. This is a very ornate building where the Buddhists will meditate, pray and worship. Secondly is the building that the monks live in. The walls of the temple will be elaborately decorated with images from the Buddha's life and in some temples the walls will also picture events from recent times. In the temple that I visited in Birmingham, the walls had images of nuclear war heads, old prime ministers and technology. The ceiling of the temple pictured the Buddha in the different

  • Word count: 461
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

Buddhism vs. Hinduism

Marcus Cendro Cendro 1 0/12/02 Period 1 Mrs. Scott Buddhism/Hinduism Paragraph Buddhism vs. Hinduism Here are some similarities and differences between the Buddhist and Hindus religion. First of all there are the two religions diet, which are basically the same. Hindu's do not kill animals for fear they will be destroying someone's soul, so therefore some Hindu's do not eat meat at all. The Buddhist diet can be explained in modern terms with the word "vegan", which refers to one who does not eat animals, but also no animal products nor derivatives. Next is the topic of afterlife, which is a difference between the two religions. Hindu's believe that humans and animals die and then are reborn in another form and that form is an indication of how well he/she behaved in their past life. As for the Buddhist belief if the mind does not achieve enlightenment in this life, or enter a Pure Land at death, it will have further rebirths, and An Enlightened Being may choose to leave the Pure Land and be reborn in human form to lead others to enlightenment. Now for the religions highest goal, which is somewhat of a difference. The goal of Buddhism is to win enlightenment. In addition to meditation, morality is very important in the pursuit of this goal. The Buddha gave us precise guidelines about how we should act as individuals, how we should treat others and how we should

  • Word count: 412
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

Explain what followers of another religion believe about the reasons why there is suffering in the world

Explain what followers of another religion believe about the reasons why there is suffering in the world The question of suffering -mentally and physically- is fundamental to the Buddhist faith. Many of its teachings are centred around it. The four noble truths are the key most important Buddhist teaching . All life is suffering (Known as dukkha) 2. Dukkha arises because of our desires and craving. 3. Dukkha can cease to exist if we put an end to our craving 4. The way to overcome dukkha is to follow the eightfold path, (Action, Livelihood, Effort, Mindfulness, Concentration, Understanding, Thought and Speech). Prince Siddhartha Gotama (who later became the Buddha) first encountered suffering when he left the palace for the first time. He was met by the four sights: old age, sickness, death and a Holy man. Whilst being in the palace he had been protected from all the different types of suffering and when he came across these affected by so much suffering he decided to leave the comfort of the palace and all of his glorious possessions and seek out the meaning of life and the truth behind life. Buddha believed there are three features all things in life share; firstly, nothing ever lasts, nothing stays unaffected all life is impermanent and ever changing this is called Anicca. Secondly, all life forms are affected by suffering Dukkha, and thirdly nothing has a soul

  • Word count: 400
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

Buddhist Views on Marriage

Buddhist Views on Marriage In Buddhism, marriage is regarded as entirely a personal, individual concern and not as a religious duty. Marriage is a social convention, an institution created by man for the well-being and happiness of man, to differentiate human society from animal life and to maintain order and harmony in the process of procreation. Even though the Buddhist texts are silent on the subject of monogamy or polygamy, the Buddhist laity is advised to limit themselves to one wife. The Buddha did not lay rules on married life but gave necessary advice on how to live a happy married life. There are ample inferences in His sermons that it is wise and advisable to be faithful to one wife and not to be sensual and to run after other women. The Buddha realised that one of the main causes of man's downfall is his involvement with other women (Parabhava Sutta). Man must realise the difficulties, the trials and tribulations that he has to undergo just to maintain a wife and a family. These would be magnified many times when faced with calamities. Knowing the frailties of human nature, the Buddha did, in one of His precepts, advise His followers of refrain from committing adultery or sexual misconduct. The Buddhist views on marriage are very liberal: in Buddhism, marriage is regarded entirely as personal and individual concern, and not as a religious duty. There are no

  • Word count: 377
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

Life of Siddhattha Gautama

Life of Siddhattha Gautama Siddhartha Gautama was a spiritual teacher from Ancient India and the founder of Buddhism. He was known generally recognized by Buddhists as the Supreme Buddha. We don't know the actual date of when he was born or when he died but many historians say that he was born in 563 BCE and died in 483 BCE. He was also known as Sakyamuni or Shakyamuni. He was the key figure in Buddhism. After he died accounts of his life, discourses, and monastic rules were taken into account. When he was young he was spoiled by his parents. He was built 3 palaces in his name. Siddhartha was brought up by his mother's younger sister. As the boy reached the age of 16, his father arranged his marriage to Yasodhara that was his cousin. In time, she gave birth to a son, Rahula. Siddhartha spent 29 years as a Prince in Kapilavastu that is now in Nepal. His father offered him anything to his need butr he did not want anything as he thought that money wasn't everything in life. At the age of 29, Siddhartha left his palace in order to fulfill his ambitions. On his trips he saw a diseased man, a decaying corpse, and an ascetic. This made him very depressed and he escaped the palace and pretended to be a beggar on the streets. After being taught the teachings of Alara Kalama. Siddhartha is said to have discovered what Buddhists call the Middle Way that was a path of moderation

  • Word count: 302
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay