A Gurdwara is a Sikh place of worship.

A Gurdwara is a Sikh place of worship, and it has one distinguishing feature from the outside, the Nishan Sahib, or Sikh religious and national flag. This serves a similar purpose to a church steeple, or the minaret on a mosque - it guides the worshipper to the place of worship. Gurdwara means 'the door or house of the Guru'. Guru means spiritual teacher or guide in religious Sikh language. When the tenth and last Sikh Guru, Guru Gobind Singh, was about to die, he decreed that the Sikh Holy Scripture should form then on be their Guru, and it became the Guru Granth Sahib. There are Gurdwaras in most of Britain's major cities. When you go inside a Gurdwara, the most striking feature is the palki, or canopy, over the place where the Guru Granth Sahib is kept during the day. The Guru Granth Sahib is placed on a specially designed wooden stool, on a raised platform called a takht. The reader sits cross legged on the takht behind the Guru Granth Sahib and a chauri, a whisk of animal hair which is a symbol of regal dignity, is waved over the Guru Granth Sahib as a mark of respect. There are no chairs in the Gurdwara so worshippers sit cross legged on the floor facing the Guru Granth Sahib. This emphasizes the importance of the Guru Granth Sahib; on its raised takht and stool, it is above everyone else and reminds Sikhs of one of their basic beliefs - that everyone, whatever

  • Word count: 1380
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

Religeous Education - Three Responsibilities

RELIGEOUS EDUCATION REVISON Guru Nanak - Three Responsibilities Firstly: Nam Japna - meditation on god's name. 'Nam' translated as name but nam means all that god is - total being and personality of god (mul mantra). This does not mean mindless repeating of words or performing actions. But the meditation on god's name (Hindu Brahmins throwing water at Hardwar and 2 Muslims praying). Secondly: Kirat Kara - earning your living honestly. Guru Nanak accepting Bhai Lalo's food > Malik Bhago (local Muslim leader) becomes angry Guru Nanak squeezed Bhai Lalo's roti and milk came out he squeezed Malik Bhago's blood came out as he got his money through exploiting the poor. Bhai Lalo worked as a carpenter. Thirdly: Vand Chhakna - giving in charity to those in need, this is liked to sewa, the service to god and humanity. Also taught is equality of birth and gender. Charitable sharing of time talents and earnings with those less fortunate than oneself. Sikhs believe that wealth within itself is not wrong providing it is gained honestly but to become obsessed by wealth is. The wealth created by hard work should be used for the benefit of the family, the Khalsa and humanity in general. Guru Arjan - Three Main Contributions . Supervised first authorised collection of Gurbani (god's word) completed in 1604. Installed in newly completed harinder sahib (Golden Temple) in

  • Word count: 1378
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

Sikh Worship

Amit Wangoo 29/04/2012 2.2 Sikh Worship Sikh worship, like many other religions is very important and it is has very specific aspects to its worship. Sikhism is considered to be a modern religion as it was founded in 15th and 16th century, despite this they have similar ways to much older religions like Hinduism. The place of worship for Sikhs is the Gurdwara. Gurdwara means ‘the doorway of the Guru’. The Sikh holy book ‘The Guru Granth Sahib’ is kept in the Gurdwara. The Gurdwara is like a community centre where other Sikhs meet each other and pray together. Outside every Gurdwara there is usually a flag that tells people this is a Sikh place of worship. The flag is called the Nishan sahib and the symbol on the flag is known as the khanda that consists of 2 curved Kirpans and a Kara (bangle). When in a Gurdwara, shoes should not be worn in the main place of worship. There are also sinks so that people can wash their hands before worship and a box of head coverings for non-Sikhs, because people must cover their heads as a sign of respect. In a Gurdwara anyone and everyone are welcome. In the main hall there is a large carpet and there are no chairs or seats so the congregation sit on the floor cross-legged. Men and women sit apart from each other in the Gurdwara; this is so they don’t distract each other. At one end of the hall there is a raised

  • Word count: 1323
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

Guru Nanak, the Apostle of Humanity 1469--1539

Guru Nanak, the Apostle of Humanity 469--1539 A turmoil was enveloping the Indian scene in the fifteenth century A.D. The political domain was in the grip of a pandemonium; the Pathan and the Mughal rulers were at daggers drawn and the poor populace was constantly trampled over. The impersonators and imposters were plundering the realm of religion. The caste discrimination was tearing off the social set up and brotherhood. The womanhood was brutally subjugated. Health, wealth and honour, all had become defenseless. Such was the predicament at the advent of Guru Nanak, the first Supreme preceptor of the Sikh Religion. He was born in the house of a revenue official, Mehta Kalu, in the year 1469 at Talwandi, in District Sheikhupura (now in Pakistan). Nearly first thirty years of his life Guru Nanak minutely studied and experienced himself with all the temporal aspects of the human life. On full moon day in the month of Kartrik in the year 1469, he emerged from his contemplative trance, and declared the real purpose of his manifestation into the mundane world. His first message to mankind echoed the Universal Brotherhood, "Na koi Hindu, na koi Musalman." To reform a society and to re-instill in it the human values, a reformist needs courage to expose the exploiters. Guru Nanak was not only endowed with Godly vision but also with the fortitude to speak against the societal

  • Word count: 1291
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

Is religion responsible for the inferiority of women

Is religion responsible for the inferiority of women? Withinn the old testament and the book of genesis it is said that God created the woman as a "helper" for the man: The LORD God said, "It is not good for the man to be alone. I will make a helper suitable for him." (NIV, Genesis 2:18) However, being a "helper" does not imply that the woman was inferior or subservient to the man; the same Hebrew word, `ezer, translated as "helper," is used to describe God, Himself, in Psalms 33:20, 70:5, 115:9-11. In fact, God created both men and women in His own image and made them equal custodians of all His creation: So God created man in his own image, in the image of God he created him; male and female he created them. God blessed them and said to them, "Be fruitful and increase in number; fill the earth and subdue it. Rule over the fish of the sea and the birds of the air and over every living creature that moves on the ground." (NRSV, Genesis 2:27-28) When God created man, he made him in the likeness of God. He created them male and female and blessed them. And when they were created, he called them "man." (NIV, Genesis 5:1-2) But the man and woman, Adam and Eve, disobeyed God in the Garden of Eden. God gave each of them punishments before evicting them from the Garden: To the woman he said, "I will greatly increase your pains in childbearing; with pain you will give birth to

  • Word count: 1268
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

A) Describe and explain the main features of a Gurdwara?

A) Describe and explain the main features of a Gurdwara? A Gurdwara is the Sikh place of worship, Gurdwara means "the doorway to the Guru". In every Gurdwara there is a Guru Granth Sahib, as well as a Nishan Sahib, which is the Sikh flag. The Nishan Sahib is the first main feature of a Gurdwara you see. The Nishan Sahib can be seen outside every Gurdwara to show a Sikh place of worship. The flag is a triangular shape and is a saffron-coloured. The colour stands for courage and sacrifice. The flag is usually on a long steel pole which is also covered in the same saffron coloured cloth. The saffron coloured cloth is changed as part of Baisakhi, the celebration in April, also on other special occasions. On the flag is the Khanda, the Khanda is the main symbol of the Sikh faith, it symbolies Gods power. The Khanda consists of four weapons in the centre is a double edged sword called a Khanda, The Khanda represents knowledge of divinity and the power of God. Surrounding the Khanda is a circular quoit, called a Chakkar which symbolies the unity of God. On either side are crossed daggers which are called Kirpans, or Piri and Miri which are named after the personal weapons of Guru Hargobind, which symbolies spiritual and temporal, power in balance. The name Khanda is taken from the double edged sword, Khanda that was used by Guru Gobind Singh when preparing Amrit for the Panj

  • Word count: 1093
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

Sikh and Christian marriage.

Sikh and Christian marriage. In any Sikh wedding the couple would probably have a traditional arranged wedding. This is when the Sikh parents find a suitable partner for their for there daughter or son. When the couples are consulted fully and meet but not alone this means that everyone can be sure the partners are suitable. The marriage cannot take place if the couple or families do not agree to it. In the past the wedding would still be arranged by both families but the couple would not be allowed to meet until the actual wedding day. ``Happy girl, now awakened to love, when the matchmaker comes with his news``. This verse is from the guru granth sahib, I think this is evidence that in the early days of the Sikh religion it was useful for parents to use a matchmaker to find a suitable partner for there daughter or son. Today young people may a suggest person they know, or leave the decision to their parents because they trust there parents and know they love them very much. In arranged wedding families would find a partner for their daughter or son by focusing on the family background, wealth, education, and cast. Unlike many marriages, many Sikh and Asian families do not see love as very important, but is something, which may develop after marriage. As long as they know they are marring their son or daughter into a stable background. Sometimes they're maybe problems

  • Word count: 1074
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

Describe and explain a Sikh’s private devotions.

Religious Studies coursework R1: Describe and explain a Sikh's private devotions. According to the rules of Sikhism, a Sikh's personal life should include three things, I. Meditation on Nam (Divine substance) and the scriptures. II. Leading life according to the Gurus teachings. III. Public spirited voluntary service. It is on these rules that Sikh's base their private lives and devotions. There are a number of daily rituals that may be practised by members of the Sikh faith. All practices are dependent on the member's religious order within Sikhism and none of these practices are compulsory. A Sikh should wake up three hours before the dawn (also known as the ambrosial hours) take bath and, concentrating their thoughts on One Immortal Being, repeat the name Waheguru which means "wondrous destroyer of darkness" or "truth is God's name." This is symbolic because by concentrating their thoughts on God whilst bathing, they are "washing away" their sins from the day before. Then this the person might sing the "Bani" at sunrise. After this they might recite particular prayers and hymns. According to the rules of Sikhism, a Sikh should recite the following scriptural compositions every morning: * The Japji * The Jaapu * The Ten Sawayyas (Quartets) - beginning "Sarawag sudh" Then they might bow down to a picture of the Gurus or just bow down and ask God to be by

  • Word count: 1061
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

Describe in detail the wedding ceremonies in Christianity and Sikhism and carefully explain the key features of each.

Describe in detail the wedding ceremonies in Christianity and Sikhism and carefully explain the key features of each. The Sikh wedding ceremony is the 'Anand Karaj' meaning the 'ceremony of bliss'. It takes place in the Gurdwara. First a meeting takes place called the Milni. It involves all relatives exchanging gifts and turbans. A reception meal is then eaten. After, the wedding ceremony takes place infront of the guru Granth Sahib. The Groom comes forward and sits facing the holy book. The bride comes in and sits at his left-hand side. The Granthi explains all the responsibilities. The couple then bow to the holy book to show they accept them. The couple stands with their fathers and a lesson is read and a hymn sung. The bride's father places garlands of flowers over the couple. He takes the grooms scarf and ties it to the bride's dupatta. On behalf of the wife, the ragis then recite a shabad. The Granthi then recites the first verse of the Lavan, composed by Guru Ram Das. This verse emphasises the performance of duty to the family and the community. Then the other three verses are sung. The second verse refers to the stage of yearning and love for each other. The third verse refers to the stage of detachment and the fourth verse refers to the final stage of harmony and union in married life during which human love blends into the love or God. For each verse, the couple

  • Word count: 1057
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

Sikh Dharma, the youngest of the world religions, is barely five hundred years old. Its founder, Guru Nanak, was born in 1469.

Sikh Dharma, the youngest of the world religions, is barely five hundred years old. Its founder, Guru Nanak, was born in 1469. Guru Nanak spread a simple message of "Ek Ong Kar": we are all one, created by the One Creator of all Creation. This was at a time when India was being torn apart by castes, sectarianism, religious factions, and fanaticism. He aligned with no religion, and respected all religions. He expressed the reality that there is one God and many paths, and the Name of God is Truth, "Sat Nam". A way of life and philosophy well ahead of its time when it was founded over 500 years ago, The Sikh religion today has a following of over 20 million people worldwide. Sikhism preaches a message of devotion and remembrance of God at all times, truthful living, equality of mankind, social justice and denounces superstitions and blind rituals. Sikhism is open to all through the teachings of its 10 Gurus The word 'Sikh' in the Punjabi language means 'disciple', Sikhs are the disciples of God who follow the writings and teachings of the Ten Sikh Gurus. The wisdom of these teachings in Sri Guru Granth Sahib are practical and universal in their appeal to all mankind. "I observe neither Hindu fasting nor the ritual of the Muslim Ramadan month; Him I serve who at the last shall save. The Lord of universe of the Hindus, Gosain and Allah to me are one; From Hindus and Muslims

  • Word count: 986
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay