Justice and punishment in two short stories: 'The Black Veil' and 'The Melancholy Hussar'

Justice and punishment in two short stories 'The Black Veil' and the 'Melancholy Hussar' draw the reader's attention to justice and punishment. In 'The Black Veil' a widower goes to a doctor, dressed in a black veil, and asks him if he can heal her son, he accepts and goes to her house and saw that her son had been hanged. The 'Melancholy Hussar' is about a woman who falls in love with a man from the Navy and he wants to her flee with him and his friends, but on the morning they are suppose to leave, her ex-lover comes back and she doesn't go along with the plan, the men were caught and shot, two of his friends were flogged. The aspects of justice and punishment in the 'Melancholy Hussar' is in the Navy, and you could be demoted for being two minutes late, and shot if you tried to desert the Navy, and in' The Black Veil', the aspects are retribution (a repayment, especially in the form of punishment) Charles Dickens is writing about the cruelty of state punishments, and if you were poor, you weren't allowed to steal food for your family, because the law came down on you very seriously. The punishments were severe because it was a violent age, so the law believed in punishing harshly. E.g. if you set fire to a haystack you would get hung. The law weren't interested in fairness it reflects the harshness of the time because there was no welfare state to help the poor. Poverty

  • Word count: 363
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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An Investigation of the way Capital Punishment is presented in

Task: An Investigation of the way Capital Punishment is presented in "Dead Man Walking" and "Let Him Have It". Introduction For our GCSE Coursework we have been watching two films, "Dead Man Walking" and "Let Him Have It". They were both based on true stories. 'Dead Man Walking' was about a man called Matthew Poncelet who supposedly raped and killed a girl. After six years had gone by, he was given the death penalty by lethal injection. 'Let Him Have It' was about a young man, Derek Bentley, who has mental disabilities and suffers from epilepsy. After spending years at home, he goes out and gets dragged into the antics of a sixteen year old Christopher Craig. After the murder of a police officer, Derek gets to death by hanging. I feel that both Matthew Poncelet and Derek Bentley are in the same, sad situation. Matthew has committed a murder and is given the death penalty, where as Derek, although did receive the death penalty, his case was different because it seemed that all of his life was bad luck due to his mental disabilities. Section 1 At the start of the film, Poncelet acted as if he shouldn't be messed with in prison using a tough voice. During the film, Sister Prejean was trying to help Poncelet hoping that if he pleads for forgiveness, then he might be released from Death Row. During this time, you could tell and see the different types of emotions that

  • Word count: 2044
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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My view on Euthanasia.

My view on Euthanasia. Euthanasia is, according to a dictionary, the act of killing an individual for the reason of mercy. This essay will examine the issue of active and passive euthanasia. Active euthanasia is an intervention that would cause death to take place when it would not otherwise happen. Passive euthanasia is the decision to withhold help from an individual, ultimately leading to the death of the individual. This essay is supposed to deal with the circumstances, if any, that euthanasia, active or passive, would be morally permissible. Before I build the wall of moral delineation between these two scenarios, consider that they are but two possible choices on a broad continuum of options about death. I would suggest that there are three hard points on this continuum; 1. Do not allow death if at all possible 2. Do not interfere with death 3. Death is a choice under this 7logic, numbers 1 & 3 define the continuum limits and number 2 the centre point. I would argue that both active and passive are between numbers 2 & 3. Active is clearly close to number 3 while passive still advocates interference with the natural process of death. Passive euthanasia is a choice to allow death when you have the option to prevent it, even in the face of the wishes of the sufferer means that you are exercising a choice about death. So maybe there are really only two hard points to the

  • Word count: 2925
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Should Capital Punishment Be Made Legal?

Should Capital Punishment Be Made Legal? In my opinion, capital punishment should be made legal. There are a number of reasons why I have formed this opinion. Although some people may argue that Capital Punishment is simply a case of 'an eye for an eye', which most people see as wrong, I don't see this as the case, and think that the information I have included here explains why I think this. The first is that the death penalty would act as a deterrent to criminals contemplating committing crime. An example of this is in Singapore, where death sentences are carried out, and there is generally far less serious crime than there is here. Secondly, the friends and family of the victim(s) get retribution. In execution the criminal is made to suffer in proportion to the crime, and is a very 'real' punishment, rather than rehabilitative therapy. Capital punishment permanently removes the criminal from society. This is much cheaper and safer than life imprisonment, and society is given complete assurance that it is safe from this person. The cost of keeping people in prison for life is much higher than the cost of executing a prisoner. (Typically, 15 years of imprisonment for an ordinary prisoner costs us £375,000). We also pay for the facilities available to prisoners whilst in prison, such as the facilities available at Parkhurst prison, on the Isle of Wight;

  • Word count: 841
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Case Study on Capital Punishment Derek Bentley and Chris Craig

Case Study on Capital Punishment Derek Bentley and Chris Craig This essay will describe the tragic story of Derek Bentley who was executed in 1953 for murder. A bombing raid over London in 1941 resulted in a young boy, Derek Bentley to be trapped under piles of rubble which may of caused some brain damage, giving Derek Epilepsy. Several years later Derek ends up with some young vandals looking for trouble, Derek gets caught and his family assign him to an approved school. After his release at the age of 19, he spent the next year in his parents’ custody. During his release he refused to leave the house and often never left his room. His caring sister Iris builds up his confidence and Derek after a year went into the outside world again. It was hard for Derek doing simple things which we often take for an advantage, things like remembering song lyrics or giving the correct tokens. It was said he had the mental age of an 11 year old. Derek’s family weren’t really that well off so they could not pay for help for Derek. Apart form Iris, his family didn’t think highly of Derek and disapprove of what ever he did. Iris was the one who helped Derek the most she was the one who helped him gain confidence in himself. Chris Craig was the other participant to this case at the age of 16; Chris was a very family influenced teenager. His brother Nivan being a high-rolling

  • Word count: 894
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Should Capital Punishment be brought back?

Should Capital Punishment be brought back? For my English assignment I have been asked to consider the question whether or not capital punishment should be brought back. I am going to be concentrating on America because it is the closest to our style of culture. Capital punishment refers to the taking of life of someone who has been found guilty of committing a crime. Some of the earlier methods were crucifixion, boiling in oil, drawing and quartering, impalement, beheading, burning alive, crushing, tearing asunder, stoning and drowning. In the United States, the death penalty is currently authorized in one of five ways: hanging, electrocution (introduced by New York State in 1890), the gas chamber (adopted in Nevada in 1923), firing squad which is used only in Utah, or lethal injection (introduced in 1977 by Oklahoma). In most nations that still retain the death penalty for some crimes, hanging or the firing squad are the preferred methods of execution. In some countries that adhere strictly to the traditional practices of Islam, beheading or stoning is still occasionally employed as punishment. Capital punishment is still used in some states of America, South Africa, China and Russia. The most common crimes committed are treason and murder. William Kemmler was the first man to be executed in the electric chair, at Auburn Prison in New York on August 7, 1890.

  • Word count: 948
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Analyse a media text documentary film called 14 days in May.

4 Days in May I am going to analyse a media text documentary film called 14 days in May. This documentary film is about a black man on death row in the Mississippi state prison, in 1979, Edward Earl Johnson charged with the shooting of a white police marshal and the attempted rape of a 60 year old white woman. Johnson has spent 8 years on death row appealing the case and is to be executed on may 20th in fourteen days time. The programme focuses on the last two weeks of the fight to save Edward Earl Johnson. Edward Earl Johnson says about the case: There was a Buick car at the scene of the crime. Johnson has a Buick car, therefore, Johnson was put into a police line up to identify the rapist. The 60 year old victim already knew Johnson and said it was not him. The death penalty is not only used in Mississippi but widely used in other states of America. In the USA there are over 3, ooo on death row. Scientific studies consistently fail to demonstrate that the executions deter people from committing crimes. In this situation it is too complex and difficult to point to any single fact or argument as the most important, because there are too many issues to cover in the abolishment of the death penalty. The states that still use the death penalty are the following, Texas, California, Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida and Tennessee. The directors choose Edward earl Johnson's

  • Word count: 1670
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Outline the arguments for and against life after death? Assess the significance of the following: reincarnation, resurrection and the immortality of the soul?

Belief in life after death has taken many forms, some which are unique in particular religious belief systems, though; others can be found in more than one religion. 'For most religions, life after death is an article of faith. In Western religions, the belief is founded in scriptural evidence, but for all religions the belief in life after death is the same: life after death has been promised to humans by an all powerful'1 There are many views of life after death in particular which have been much adhered to and much discussed by philosophers. This essay will attempt to put forward some of the key ideas and arguments for and against life after death. One view of life after death does have a venerable philosophical history. It can be found in Plato's Phaedo. Here we are presented with the figure of Socrates who is about to drink poison because he has been condemned to death. His friends are grief stricken but Socrates assures them that he is perfectly able to survive death. His friends ask Socrates how he wants to buried and he responds to them by saying "however you wish, provided you catch me, that is, and I don't get away from you". Socrates is distinguishing himself and his body, which is soon to be lifeless. He is clearly thinking of his real self as something distinct from his body. So according to this argument we shall survive as a disembodied self. Many

  • Word count: 2255
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Decide whether the rules of causation are now weighted too far against the interests of the defendant.

Deepti Teelanah Decide whether the rules of causation are now weighted too far against the interests of the defendant. When deciding on a case of death, the courts use the 'but for' test, i.e. but for the defendants act, the death would not have happened. In the case of White 1910: The accused had intended to murder his mother, he had poison in a glass ready for her but she suddenly died from a heart failure, she died due to the heart failure and not the poison. The defendant could only be liable for attempted murder but it is clear that he had desired it to happen. He could not, therefore be found guilty of murder. When deciding what the legal cause of death is, two more issues are looked at more closely: Firstly, did the act of the defendant play a significant (more than a minimal role) part in causing the death of the victim? Secondly, has any other event occurred to break the chain of causation? It has been determined that an event of this kind needs to be something completely unforeseeable. It's not thought unforeseeable that the police might return the fire of a gunman. In the case of Pagett 1983: The accused was being pursued by the police and had forcibly taken his pregnant girlfriend captive after injuring her mother and stepfather. He later came out of one the flats, using his girlfriend as a shield. He then fired his shot gun at 2 officers. The policeman

  • Word count: 1206
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Christian beliefs about death

Christian beliefs about death "Death is a comma not a full stop." Death is the gateway to eternal life. It is the start of the longest journey that you will ever take. Everyone will be judged according to how they have lived their life. If they have committed crimes that cannot be forgiven, they will be sent to Hell, a place of suffering and fire. Death is not the end. Jesus' death could have been seen as a sign of this. Telling us that death is not a full stop and that there is something to look forward to afterlife. We are only scared of the unknown. Many quotations in the bible support the theory of eternal life. Jesus says in John's gospel, "He that believes in me though he shall die yet he shall live!" Also St Paul's letter to the Corinthians, "this is how it will be when the dead are raised to life. When the body is buried it is ugly and weak, when raised it will be beautiful and strong, when buried it is a physical body, when raised it will become a spiritual body." There is an existence between Heaven and Hell, Purgatory. This is a place where no one is truly evil and no one is truly spiritually moral. They are sent here to either be prepared for Heaven or to be prepared for Hell. Theologians believe that the majority of people will go to Purgatory first. Most individuals are not morally perfect or absolute evil. Christian Burial Rituals All Christian churches

  • Word count: 1440
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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