Islam and capital punishment!

Islam and capital punishment! Capital punishment is permitted in Islam under guidelines found in the Koran, the holiest book of Islamic scripture, and hadith, authoritative doings and sayings of Muhammad and his companions. In the case of a murderer, the victim's family can demand death, said Farhat J. Ziadeh, a scholar who has written on Islam and criminal law for the Oxford Encyclopaedia of Modern Islam. Death is also sanctioned in adultery, he said. But death is imposed less often than scriptures allow. In the case of adultery, execution is not warranted unless the crime was witnessed by as many as 4 people. As a result, "the measure of proof is so difficult that (the likelihood of a death sentence) is practically nullified," Ziadeh said. In murder cases, at least 2 "trustworthy" male Muslim witnesses to the crime are needed for a sentence of death. "Especially when it comes to the death penalty, circumstantial evidence is not acceptable -- there should be concrete witnesses," said Muhammad Sahli, a Muslim chemist and businessman in Richmond. But even when murder is proved through eyewitnesses, death is not mandatory. Any Muslim who has murdered is encouraged to ask forgiveness from the victim's family, Sahli said. "If those people genuinely have the fear of God in their heart and I seek forgiveness, they should forgive me, because only God can be the judge of

  • Word count: 574
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

Capital Punishment.

Capital Punishment In the 1960's capital punishment was still an issue in our country. It brought up many questions about morality which finally led to its abolition in 1969. In the 1950's the houses in Rillington Place were divided into 10 flats. From the outside Number 10 looked the same as every other, however the horrors that were found in it in March 1953 made it one of the most infamous addresses in England. John Christie's murder method was to lure women to his house, get them drunk then gas them. Once they were unconscious he strangled them and finished by raping their corpses. In 1949, Timothy Evans returned home to find his wife and 14 month old daughter strangled to death. With shock and panic he fled to London. A few days later he went to the police in Wales and told them of the murders- he blamed his neighbor John Christie however he was charged and tried for both murders and hanged in 1950. John Christie had also fled his flat but a tenant found three dead prostitutes hidden in Christie's kitchen. Upon further examination they found Mrs. Christie under the floorboards in the bedroom and body parts and bones in the garden. When he was found he confessed to have killing his wife and eventually others. Altogether he was charged with 9 murders and hanged on July 15th, 1953. Timothy Evan was an innocent man hanged for a crime he did not commit. Who has to decide

  • Word count: 574
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

Explain why the suffering, death and resurrection of Jesus are important for Christians today? Although Christians worship and live by many of Jesus' teachings, actions and miracles

R.S. Coursework Question 2 Explain why the suffering, death and resurrection of Jesus are important for Christians today? Although Christians worship and live by many of Jesus' teachings, actions and miracles, the most celebrated of his actions and miracles are his death, suffering and resurrection. This is because the sacrifice reunites with us God, and forgives us of our sins. I am going to give detailed reasons of why this means so much to Christians, and why they use a symbol of a man being tortured to death as a symbol of victory. Suffering and Death One of the biggest questions asked by Christians about Jesus' sacrifice is "why did he do it?" Why would man go through being tortured to death for us? There are many reasons for this. The main reason is he did it for our sake. Jesus dies for the sins of humanity, and in order to do that he has to make a great sacrifice. This is to symbolise that the sins of humanity are so great that they cannot be forgiven simply by a small death, the sacrifice has to be one of full suffering and one of the most painful deaths imaginable. The great thing about Jesus' sacrifice is not just that it was extremely painful, but also because he went through it for us. It is hard to imagine any one being tortured to death for people, half of whom wouldn't know or care who he is. It is also great because Jesus is the son of God. This is

  • Word count: 574
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

Romero. "I do not believe in death without resurrection," he said. "If they kill me, I will be resurrected in the Salvadoran people."

"I do not believe in death without resurrection," he said. "If they kill me, I will be resurrected in the Salvadoran people." * Even at his death he was still strong in his faith. Romero begged for international intervention. He was alone. The people were alone. In 1980 the war claimed the lives of 3,000 per month, with cadavers clogging the streams, and tortured bodies thrown in garbage dumps and the streets of the capitol weekly. With one exception, all the Salvadoran bishops turned their backs on him, going so far as to send a secret document to Rome reporting him, accusing him of being "politicized" and of seeking popularity. The night Romero drove out of the capitol to Paisnal to view Grande's body and the old man and seven year old who were killed with him, marked his change. In a packed country church Romero encountered the silent endurance of peasants who were facing rising terror. Their eyes asked the question only he could answer: Will you stand with us as Rutilio did? Romero's "yes" was in deeds. The peasants had asked for a good shepherd and that night they received one. * Romero loved the people who he fought for and helped. "God needs the people themselves," he said, "to save the world . . . The world of the poor teaches us that liberation will arrive only when the poor are not simply on the receiving end of hand-outs from governments or from the churches,

  • Word count: 570
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

Death Penalty.

Death Penalty ) The text is about a famous Britain hangman called Albert Pierrepoint. He worked 25 years as an executioner and in this period he carried out over 100 executions. He was known as a very professional man, who kept his feelings away from the job. But suddenly seven months after he had hanged Ruth Ellis, he resigned. He didn't give any reason, but in 1974 he published a biography called "Executioner Pierrepoint, in which he admitted to have been emotionally involved in some of the executions. Furthermore he said that all the executions had "achieved nothing but revenge". But he still didn't feel any guilt, even though he admitted that he could have executed innocent persons. Both his father and his uncle had been executioners to, so it was only natural when he as 13 years old dropped out of school and got apprenticed to his uncle. He was a very enthusiastic kid and very thorough with his job. Later he began travelling to other countries, where he officiated executions. He once executed 27 people in a 24 hours period in post-war Germany. At home Pierrepoint was a normal guy, who liked singing Irish ballads and joking about all sorts of things, but one the thing he never did, was to bring his work with him home, he didn't even discuss it with his wife. 3) In 1972 the Supreme Court declared the death penalty as forbidden, but in 1976 it was taken into use again.

  • Word count: 562
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

english original writing

As I stare at the 4 same grey walls I know I don't have long left before they execute me. It is my own fault I have to say sorry to the families of the men I killed. I truly am sorry for what I have done. It was a cold dark foggy night and I am trying to get away from my abusive husband. I have tried to leave him before but he always manages to get me back by saying he will change and he is sorry but he never is. This time is different though I am nearly there my sweaty hand reaches for the door handle and someone grabbed my from behind dragging me back by my hair. WHERE DO YOU THINK YOUR GOING!!!!!. My husband James screamed in my face. Then I saw it my only way out, the knife, I grabbed it and plunged it into his heart again and again. I felt like I was finally getting my own back 10 years of hate filled me up and I couldn't stop after 47 times I finally stopped and stepped over his lifeless body I was free finally. Well at least I thought I was as I opened the door at my husbands best friend lee was stood there and he knew what I had done so in his heart went the knife this time I knew I was free. I walked out of the bathroom of the hotel I have been staying in since I have killed my husband. I glanced at the TV and I saw a picture of me splashed all over the news it was so unlike what I am now happy and smiling while now I am sad and I look years older than 26.the police

  • Word count: 562
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

I Would Reintroduce The Death Penalty.

I Would Reintroduce The Death Penalty An eye for an eye a tooth for a tooth, therefore a life for a life. Every individual has a right to 'life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness'. Those who violate this right must pay the ultimate penalty. There have been many debates and protests about the death penalty for years and two views dominate this debate. On the one hand the criminal must be given the punishment they deserve which may be death but on the other hand under no circumstances is it possible to justify the use of the death penalty. The aims of the punishment are to find a way to deal with criminals and at the same time protect society and the individual. It is hoped that the punishment will discourage the person from repeating the crime and also prevent others from committing that crime. There are many reasons for and against the death penalty; here are some arguments for the death penalty. * When someone is sentenced for life it normally means 25years or less. Life should mean life but far too often the prisoners are released after a much shorter sentence and can be regarded as a great risk to society. * Sometimes the death penalty is the only way for criminals to understand what will happen if they commit such a crime. * Quite often criminals prefer to be executed than to spend the rest of their lives in prison. Some even commit suicide, as they cannot live

  • Word count: 560
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

Flatliners review.

Flatliners Essay The story behind the movie Flatliners is very deep. On the surface Flatliners can be taken as a normal psychological-horror film. The mysteries of death compel the five medical students (Julia Roberts, Kiefer Sutherland, Kevin Bacon, William Baldwin, and Oliver Platt) in Flatliners to experiment with their own mortality by putting each other in a suspended animation like state. Delving deeper into the film the viewer can see that the film also reflects issues of ethics, spirituality and on existential questions. The death experiences of the five main characters suggest to the viewer that there is a life after death. The biggest and most obvious existential question asked in Faltliners is simply "Is there life after death." All of the characters that experienced the brain death all concluded that there was something beyond. Dave Labraccio the atheist of the group saw mountains, flashbacks of his former life and even a girl he picked on as a child. When Joe was brought back to life he told the group that he felt a good presence guiding him through his dream like state. The movie tries to suggest to the viewer that there is something beyond life. However the movie also does suggest through the Julia Roberts character "Rachel Manus" that every person has a different death experience. The movie also reflects spirituality in almost every death experience scene.

  • Word count: 555
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

All by Myself - Night by Ellie Wiesel

Kris Scheller Adv. Comp. 2/15/01 Literary Analysis All by Myself In the novel Night, an autobiography by Elie Wiesel, he tells how the horrific encounters during the battle for survival effects a person. These encounters are enough to drive anyone to death, but not everyone has the heart of Elie Wiesel. The actions of fellow inmates, guards, and family members are enough to negatively affect Elie. The gloomy conditions of the camps and the bland surroundings can only assist in the destruction of his life. Just stripping someone from their home or family can change anyone dramatically. Taking Elie from his home started the beginning of his road to misery. At the beginning of the novel, the family learned that they would be transported in a few days to a place they've never seen or probably even heard of. The jam-packed ride to Birkenau could have only sent chills down through Elie's body, knowing this was only the start of what could become. The screams of Madame Schachter just made the crammed ride into a tiny, overcrowded vehicle worse. "Jews, look! Look through the window! Flames! Look!" (25). Seeing adult men hit her to the brink of death only terrified Elie even more. Birkenau became a place full of uncertainties for Elie. Would this become the place where he last saw his family? Could this become the place where he saw his father suffer until his

  • Word count: 548
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay

Capital punishment.

The Death Penalty is no doubt an expensive and brutal death form that has been practiced for many years and is a way to end any convicted persons life. Capital Punishment is an upright alternative for dealing with convicted criminals, but changes must be made to improve this form of discipline. Many things must be considered when dealing with the death penalty such as, historical records which show the earliest recorded of the death penalties, the reasons for punishments due to what they did, and certain methods used. The seven most popular ways in which capital punishment is performed in our society today will be discussed as well. Historical records show that the earliest records of the death penalty can be dated all the way back to 1750 BC in the Code of Hammurabi. From the fall of Rome to the beginning of our modern era, the death penalty was practiced all throughout Western Europe (Bedau, 3). The movement for the abolition of the death penalty began in the 18th century with the writings of Montesquieo and Voltaire. In Great Britain, Jeremy Bentham was a very influential person who has had the number of capital crimes reduced in the 18th and 19th centuries. Some of the first countries to abolish the Death Penalty included Venezuela in 1863, San Marino in 1865, Costa Rica in 1877 and Portugal in 1867. There are many reasons for punishment due to extreme crimes.

  • Word count: 548
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
Access this essay