Should capital punishment be brought back in the U.K.

English Essay Should capital punishment be brought back in the U.K When turning on the television, radio, or simply opening the local newspaper, we are bombarded with news of arrests, murders, homicides, serial killers, and other such tragedies. It is a rare occasion to go throughout a day in this world and not hear of these, this could all be stopped if we reintroduce capital punishment into the U.K. First of all, what is capital punishment; it is the most severe of all sentences: that of death. Also known as the death penalty, capital punishment has been banned in many countries. In the United States, an earlier move to eliminate capital punishment has now been reversed and more and more states are resorting to capital punishment for serious offences such as murder. There are many methods of capital punishment including lethal injection and the electric chair, hanging and hundreds of years ago there was crucifixion. It was abolished in the UK in 1965 for all crimes except treason and piracy, and in 1998 it was entirely abolished in the UK. The last people to be hanged in the U.K were hanged at the same time but at different prisons: Peter Anthony Allen at Liverpool and Gwynne Owen Evans at Manchester Prisons. Both were hanged on 13 August 1964. Subsequent people were sentenced to death, but they were all reprieved. It is still an issue because there are many murderers

  • Word count: 2042
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Capital Punishment

Capital Punishment Is Capital Punishment, otherwise known as the Death Penalty, a disgraceful and unjust way to kill a fellow Human being? Or is it a justifiable way to punish someone in a modern day society? Some nations use the Death Penalty as their most severe punishment. Capital Punishment is one of the most debated issues in current day life. Is it acceptable or not? Many politicians have put their arguments across highlighting both their benefits and drawbacks. In the past people in Britain were often executed by hanging or by having their heads severed. But nowadays very few countries allow the Death Penalty. In fact, it follows the abolition of the death penalty for treason and piracy in the 1998 Crime and Disorder Act and is part of a global trend which has made massive strides in recent years. Criminals are executed via lethal injection or electric chair. Some say this is a less painful and more 'humane' way of killing. But others argue against it. The Death Penalty existed for centuries for crimes such as: theft and treason, to crimes like murder and rape. Until 1808 execution was an 'entertainment' for the public until reforms were introduced to the English Parliament to banish the Death Penalty for more than 200 crimes including; being in the company of Gypsies for more than one month and "strong evidence of malice" in children aged between 7-14. Hundreds of

  • Word count: 2036
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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For my Personal Research Study (PRS), I am going to research Capital Punishment.

For my Personal Research Study (PRS), I am going to research Capital Punishment. Capital Punishment is about taking a life for a life(s). For example if you commit a crime like Murder and you are convicted of murdering someone you could end up being killed by "The Electric Chair" or you could get an injection that will kill you. Capital Punishment is an interesting topic because people have debated about this subject for years. The question I have chosen for my PRS is should Capital Punishment be reintroduced? My hypothesis is Capital Punishment should be reintroduced for crimes severe enough such as Mass Murder and Treason i.e. murdering a Queen/King or President of a country. The topic I have chosen is part of the Beliefs and Values unit that I have studied in Humanities. My hypothesis is based on the Key Idea. Individuals and groups have different beliefs, attitudes and values regarding cultural, moral, political, religious, spiritual and social issues. I will use a range of research methods to investigate my hypothesis. For my secondary methods I will use books, the Internet and newspaper articles. For my primary research I will design and distribute a questionnaire to discover people's views on Capital Punishment. I am a year 11 student at Aylward School. As part of my GCSE Humanities course I am required to complete a Personal Research Study. I

  • Word count: 2003
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Christianity and Capital Punishment

Capital Punishment In my essay I am going to explain what differing Christian attitudes might be to Capital Punishment and look at the statement " God gives life only God can take it away." Question 1 The subject of capital punishment is a complicated one because there are many reasons for and against capital punishment. One reason for capital punishment is that it deters( puts off ) potential murderers. Some people in our society only understand the language of violence. For these people the threat of the death penalty is the only deterrence likely to affect the way they behave. Although this could create martyrs. Amnesty international is a company against the death penalty here is one of there quotes ' Capital Punishment is the ultimate cruel, inhuman and degrading punishment which violates the right to live...' The basic right of any human is the right to live and practising the death penalty is violating that right. A very good reason against capital punishment is that in the past the wrong person has been hanged, Arthur Koestler supports this reason when he said 'Innocent men have been hanged and will be hanged in the future unless the death penalty is abolished...'. Two examples of what Arthur Koestler said are the hangings of Timothy Evans and Derrick Bentley both of these men were wrongfully accused and hanged because of it. Some Christians believe in giving people

  • Word count: 1926
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Should Christians allow capital punishment?

Should Christians allow capital punishment? The question of whether Christians should allow capital punishment is controversial and is often argued between many Christians. This question can be answered by using the bible to help them understand their morale and ways of life. The Christians believe that Christians should allow capital punishment and they argue this by using the bible in Exodus 21 24 "eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot" this suggests that the bible is saying that if a person commits a crime such as murder then the criminal should be treated with the same crime. This shows that the bible says that if a person is guilty of murder then the criminal himself should be murdered which shows that the bible is supporting capital punishment. The Christians would argue that God himself commands the use of capital punishment. We can see a good example of the first acts of capital punishment, when God was involved directly or indirectly, in taking of life as a punishment for the nation of Israel. Therefore many Christians think that they should allow capital punishment because if God himself is commanding the use of capital punishment many feel that they should allow capital punishment and follow the example of God. Many people also interpret this as if the crime has been committed that the person who has committed it must be punished. This

  • Word count: 1923
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Capital Punishment Vs Right to Life

Angie Martinez January 3, 2006 Capital Punishment Vs Right to Life Capital punishment is the execution of someone by the state for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. The question of capital punishment, however, lies on whether it is morally right to take away the life of a human being. For instance, religious beliefs oppose to this issue, their idea of God and the right to life is how they base their argument on. On the other hand, the theory of utilitarianism justifies capital punishment as long as it creates a greater balance of happiness vs. unhappiness. The Retribution theory also supports capital punishment, the idea of an eye for an eye and a tooth for tooth is what this principle defines to be human justice. Overall, capital punishment is an issue in which the right to life can be morally argued through the different views and ethical standards of religious beliefs, the theories of utilitarianism and retribution. Christians believe God is the only one who can take away peoples lives. In the early history of Christianity, Christians supported the death penalty on the grounds of secular arguments. For instance, the Pope Innocent III defended the argument of capital punishment when he suggested, "The secular power can, without mortal sin, exercise judgment of blood, provided that it punishes with justice, not out of hatred, with prudence, not

  • Word count: 1918
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Using an examination of Act One, Scene Three (punishment) as a starting point, explore the varying ways in which Wertenbaker presents different attitudes to punishment in the play as a whole?

Saturday, 14 December 2002 Jad Salfiti A2 English Literature Using an examination of Act One, Scene Three (punishment) as a starting point, explore the varying ways in which Wertenbaker presents different attitudes to punishment in the play as a whole? 'Our Country's Good' is based on events that occurred in the first penal colony to be set up in Australia in 1789. The play deals with the prisoners in the colony, who were imprisoned for minor infractions, while still in Britain. It tells of the abuse they endured at the hands of their officers, in the world's most remote outpost. Some British convicts were dragged over from Britain for petty crimes such as stealing a morsel of food. These harsh laws were imposed in direct response to public opinion. This 'public' wanted severe punishment for those crimes committed against property (i.e. theft), and was less concerned with crimes against the self (i.e. murder). After a horrendously severe voyage at sea, and with rations becoming dangerously low, the Governor of the colony, Captain Arthur Phillip realizes that morale is at an all time low. In an effort to uplift the spirits of the convicts and officers, he suggests a stage play be presented. The convicts would take the parts in this comedy; 'The Recruiting Officer'. In Act One Scene Three, political conflict in shown in attitudes towards punishment: should prison act to

  • Word count: 1918
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Imprisonment - They said that she was mad when she locked herself in the room. I did not, for I understood.

Imprisonment They said that she was mad when she locked herself in the room. I did not, for I understood. I knew what she was doing and why. If she had had her way, she would never have come out of that room. Yet they would not let her be. They carried out her limp, pale body, and I thought for a moment that she had won. But no- they took her to hospital and forced her back to life. 'Rescued'. I know why she locked herself in there, with nothing but the four, white walls for company. I understand, for I am the same, but in quite a different way. My brother died a few months ago. Murdered actually. By her. Obviously, I did make a vague attempt to murder her, but by then she had decided to lock herself in the room. I was slightly annoyed- it is, after all, my room. I had been the one who painted it white, while she just sat there, watching me, never offering to help. It was I who saw her go into the room, shut the door and lock herself in. They found out, as they do, immediately afterwards. They did not ask me anything, for they had almost forgotten my very existence. They thought it was her way of coping with her boyfriend's death. They did not know that she had no reason to grieve- after all, it was she who ended his life. She was not suicidal- full of remorse for what she had done. She had never regretted anything in her life, and this was definitely not a mistake. I

  • Word count: 1915
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Research project - The escape from Sobibor.

Michael Falotico 12/00 History- Mr. Conrad Poly Prep Research Project: The Escape from Sobibor During the Holocaust, there were many concentration and death camps. Some were used for labor, others for the sole purpose of eliminating the Jews. Some of the death camps were very well know like Auschwitz. Others were very small but were there for the same purpose. Sobibor was a very small death camp outside of the small town of Sobibor, in Poland. Nothing was very special about this camp; It was small, the living conditions were terrible, a lot of people were infected with disease, some people worked, most people died. It was a typical death camp. The only difference was that the Jews in this camp led a revolt, and won. Using the help of Russian POWs and good team work, they were able to escape the inevitable death that awaited them. I believe that the escape from Sobibor Death Camp was only possible do to excellent team work, careful planning, communication, cooperation, and trust. From the time of its creation in June of 1942 to the time of the revolt on October 14, 1943, Sobibor was responsible for the deaths of over 260,000 Jews (not to mention gypsies, POWs, and other "inferior" races). If you

  • Word count: 1908
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Evaluate the whole workshop both your work and work of others in the group. Look particularly at social, cultural and historical issues explored.

Evaluate the whole workshop both your work and work of others in the group. Look particularly at social, cultural and historical issues explored. Before the workshop began, I knew little about the death penalty, what qualifies a criminal to receive this sentence, and countries in which the death penalty was accepted. The workshop included different methods of bringing the texts to life and to develop the classes understanding of each task. Each stimulus that was studied also gave a different viewpoint to the death penalty, by displaying opinions through a speculation or a monologue. Every stimulus also described scenes which differed from others socially, culturally and historically. Though each stimulus was studied using a variety of explorative strategies, and showed different situations where the death penalty was prominent, the majority of students in the class came to a conclusion on capital punishment. By the end of the workshop, (it is unknown whether the workshop influenced these opinions entirely) a total of four out twenty three students were for the death penalty, with a huge nineteen students standing opposed to the sentence. "Long Black veil" was sung by Joan Baez, and written by Danny Dill and Marijohn Wilkin. The melody is originally a 1950s song, though it was re-released in the 1980s. The song was written and sung as Anglo-American contempory folk

  • Word count: 1901
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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