Discuss how violent material on screen might - a) Do harm and b) Do good.

Discuss how violent material on screen might a) Do harm b) Do good The media operate relatively freely in countries like Britain, compared to those under more repressive regimes such as China. Nevertheless, there are a plethora of laws and regulations which act as constraints on media production. Television and radio are subject to the strongest controls of any media, for technological and political reasons. The BBC's licence is renewed every ten years, and the license fee set by the government, which also appoints the board of governors. Their role is to ensure that the BBC fulfils its obligations as laid down by the law, and if necessary to intervene if individual programmes are deemed to exceed the BBC's remit. Violence on screen today is over rated; people seem to blame it for a lot of the things that go on today. But in my opinion people need to take other things into account. For example, during a child's life you can't discount the role of such things as violent video games, the social values of parents and peers, or general living conditions. If you eat something that you have not tried before and immediately get sick, you will probably assume there's a direct relationship between the two events. And if at some later date you forget about your first experience and eat the same thing again-and immediately get sick again, you can be fairly sure that whatever

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Spectator violence in sports is everywhere, and it is on the rise. Just a few weeks ago a San Francisco Giants baseball fan was fatally stabbed and his friend beaten unconscious by three men following the game Barry

Aaron Gerhardstein Professor Dyer Rhetoric and Composition 131-04 25 October 2004 Spectator Violence All Too Familiar Spectator violence in sports is everywhere, and it is on the rise. Just a few weeks ago a San Francisco Giants baseball fan was fatally stabbed and his friend beaten unconscious by three men following the game Barry Bonds hit his 700th home run against the San Diego Padres. The Washington Redskins-Philadelphia Eagles game on September 20th was delayed when the Eagles had to leave their bench when a cloud of pepper spray drifted on the field as a result of the police using it to stop fights between fans. Spectator violence isn't a new thing; it dates all the way back to the chariot races in the Coliseum, where fights between the fans broke out frequently, and riots were not uncommon. Violence today hasn't reached what it was in Rome, but it is reaching new heights in today's society. The effects of the increase in violence are not limited to the increased number of spectator injuries and deaths. This increasing violence is also portraying a very negative image that sets a bad influence for society, namely children. Most of children's role models are sports figures, and if they see violence in connection with sports, they are more likely to act violently than if they had non-violent role models. The media plays the paradoxical role in transmitting

  • Word count: 1809
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Persecution.

Persecution The meaning of Persecution Over the centuries, Persecution has had many definitions. Sometimes it means more sometimes it means less but at all time, persecution is neither desirable nor anything to admire. Today we are aware of several forms of persecution but in most cases are powerless to stop it. Today the accepted definition of persecution found in the Oxford Dictionary (1993) is: "1 The act persecuting someone or subjecting someone to hostility or ill treatment; the fact of being persecuted; an instance esp. a particular course or period, of this b Harassment, persistent annoyance 2 The action of pursuing with intent to catch, injure or kill; pursuit of a subject etc." Subjecting someone to hostility or ill treatment is one of the phrases used there and this is precisely what persecution is. A person or a group of people are singled out for extraordinarily heinous treatment. A recent example of this is the holocaust that took place the mid twentieth century, referring to the mass murder and torture the Jews suffered at the hands or the Germans. In addition, when the term persecution is used it is taken to mean that the person on the receiving end of the maltreatment has done nothing to warrant it. The persecutors are acting out of malice and perhaps do not even feel the need to explain themselves and when they do their rationalization is based on

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Source based discussion on the events at Sharpville.

History Coursework a) There are some similarities between the two Sources (A+B) The first that I noticed was the presence of Saracens, both writers time and again point this out: "...the Saracens headed for the police station..." Almost directly links to "...about a dozen Saracens were on call..." in Source B. Secondly both writers agree about the influx of people to the area of Sharpville. Whereas Tyler writes about "...crowds in the street..." and source B refers to "...thousands of Africans shouting Africa! Africa!" Finally I will mention that both articles and authors agree on the time of the event. Tyler refers to "...lunch time..." and Source B uses the word "...noon..." to very loosely describe the time in which these events occurred. Together these sources should be rather closely similar information. b) Alongside the similarities there are several distinct differences between the key points in the texts; the first that I noticed was the descriptions of the crowd's attitudes and moods. Source A describes the mood as a calm "...Sunday outing..." with both Africans and Police "...waving..." at each other, whereas in source B; the writer puts emphasis on the crowds aggressive actions towards the police. "...Virtually besieged..." and "...Africans closed the way again..." make out that the Africans were being very forwardly/openly aggressive and this is backed up with

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Religion and politics

Both liberals and conservatives have become quite adept at mixing religion and politics in our current society. One also continues to observe an ongoing practice of civil religion demonstrated by presidents and office-seekers on both the left and right. Generally, the leftist merger of religion and politics has received greater social acceptability because it has been cloaked in such rights' causes as civil rights, women's rights, or economic rights (the social distribution of wealth). The advocating of these rights issues have provided an appearance of transcending religion, keeping the left relatively free from criticism of any church and state overlap. Christian Conservatives, however, have found it more difficult to reasonably combine faith and politics because they have more overtly recognized that their political positions are grounded on faith assumptions. This has resulted in numerous attacks by both non-Christians and Christians alike against the conservative attempt to merge religion and politics. Three arguments have been used most frequently against the conservative mixture of religion and politics. In what follows each of these arguments is stated and then refuted. The first argument is that politics is too worldly. The essence of the argument is that politics is part of this world's system, and Christ clearly taught His followers to "love not the world," and

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Violence in the South of Thailand

Violence in the South of Thailand By: Akashay Agarwal 11D Booklet on Problems, Causes, Effects and Solutions Contents Pages . Location 3 2. History 3 3. Problem 3 4. Causes/Reasons 4 5. Effects 4 6. Solutions 4 7. Opinion 5 8. Bibliography 5 Location The Violence in the South of Thailand has been reported in four provinces that are located at the extreme South Tip of Thailand, bordering the neighbouring country Malaysia. The names of these provinces are Yala, Pattani, Narathiwat and Satun. These are the provinces where the majorities are Muslims and where civil unrest has erupted once again since January 2004, including attacks on civilians and Army Camps. History Violence in Southern of Thailand has been a long problem, stretching over 500 years. Thailand is a Buddhist Nation with over 90% of the population being Buddhist. The next majorities are 4% Muslims that live mostly in the Southern Thailand provinces of Yala, Pattani and Narathiwat. Most of these Muslims are of Malyan origin and always wanted a Country of their own, which they wanted to call, "Greater Pattani". Since then, Muslim separatists have been fighting with security forces and have caused loss to life and property. For a brief period, violence had subsided and there was peace around. However, recently in the past few years violence has erupted again in the South due to

  • Word count: 1756
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Christians believe life is a gift from God, and therefore it is sacred. Christians believe that because God created life, life has a special relationship with God.

Lisa Wilson Christians believe life is a gift from God, and therefore it is sacred. Christians believe that because God created life, life has a special relationship with God. God is always part of everyone's life and humans do not have the right to do what they like with human life. Christians believe that the human body belongs to its creator, God. And so life and death decisions must be in Gods hands and no one else's: " Do you not know that your body is a temple of the holy spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God? You are not your own" Corinthians 6:19. Christians have different views on when life begins. Many Christians, Roman Catholics in particular believe that life begins at conception. Whereas others believe that life begins at some definite point during pregnancy, when the baby starts to move inside the womb. A medieval philosopher, Thomas Aquinas, believed that a foetus becomes a human being when God implants the soul - approximately 40 days after conception for boys and 90 days for girls. Some Christians follow that belief, though others find it unreasonable. A third view is that life begins when a baby is capable of living outside the womb. Many people believe that a baby cannot be considered as a separate life until it is capable of living outside the womb. There are therefore different views about when life begins amongst Christians. This will

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Describe the teachings of Christianity about war and pacifism

Describe the teachings of Christianity about war and pacifism Throughout Christianity, there is not just one teaching about war and peace there are many different teachings and views. Christians believe that God wants them to live in peace but there are different ways to achieve this. This is were view s on whether war is right or wrong differ. There are a variety of teachings concerning war ranging from: pacifism, non-resistance, just war, preventive and crusade. Here are two definitions of pacifism: * The belief that disputes between nations should and can be settled peacefully. * Opposition to war or violence as a means of resolving disputes1. Most Christian's are pacifist because that they believe that it is never right to use violence, whatever the circumstances, even to achieve what it 'right' or to defeat 'evil'. This is different to those who believe in non-violence, these can be Christians or non-Christians. People who believe in non-violence believe that there are other ways to get what you want. This is not doing nothing, they are just using other method's to accomplish what they want for example marches, protests, boycotts and sit-ins. A famous example of a peaceful protest that succeeded brilliantly was they boycott of the bus system for black rights in 1955. This was led by Martin Luther King even thought he was not a Christian believed very strongly in

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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'If the government wants to make a serious impact on the crime problem it should concentrate resources not on tackling street crime but on violence in the family home'. Discuss.

'If the government wants to make a serious impact on the crime problem it should concentrate resources not on tackling street crime but on violence in the family home'. Discuss. However, crime and criminals do exist, on the streets, in large cities, in fact all across the nation, only sometimes those very same crimes committed on the streets are actually happening in the one place society believes to be 'safe'..... home! 'Hidden crimes', (mainly due to the lack of public awareness) appear less personal and even less important if individuals are not directly affected. Domestic violence along with child abuse is one area, only three decades ago that was reluctantly accepted as an 'ordinary crime', forcing it to be considered a 'hidden crime'. Not only did the perpetrator himself not acknowledge what he was doing was criminal, but also society and law enforcement agencies overlooked family violence, accepting it as part of family life. With attitudes the way they were, it is not surprising that police, and their court systems, were reluctant to intervene unless, a very serious assault or even murder had occurred. Domestic violence then, was interpreted as a 'domestic' matter, which authorities were not responsible for and therefore perpetrators were justifiably 'chastising' where they felt it was necessary. Nevertheless, in the late 1960's, early 70's, women's

  • Word count: 1668
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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Describe the importance of the Bible in the life and worship of Christians

Part A Describe the importance of the Bible in the life and worship of Christians The Bible is paramount in the life and worship of Christians. It is a guide to worship, belief, practices and values. It carries God's authorities in matters of belief and behaviour. In 2 Timothy 3: 16-17, St Paul states that "All scripture is inspired by God and is useful for teaching the truth, rebuking the error, correcting faults, and giving instruction for right of living, so that the person who served God may be fully qualified and equipped to do every kind of good deed." Christians read the Bible for a numerous amount of reasons, such as inspiration, encouragement, guidance, comfort, or to bring them closer to God. They can use the Bible to look for principles to help them make decisions about certain moral and social concerns, such as abortion, prejudice, poverty, war etc. Christians are taught to live their lives as the Bible tells them to. Good Christians have great faith in God and worship him through prayer, they have been taught to do this from the stories of Jesus and his miracles. This should be an active influence on their lives, in the way that they make decisions on a moral level and the way they will choose to bring up their children. In many ways the whole idea of Christianity is based on worship and having the faith to worship only God. In the Ten Commandments given to

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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Religious Studies (Philosophy & Ethics)
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