• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6

Biology Investigation What affects the crawling speed of maggots?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Biology Investigation

What affects the crawling speed of maggots?

Plan

This is an investigation to find out what affects the crawling speed of maggots, there are lots of different variables which could affect the speed at which a maggot might crawl, we will control one of these conditions and investigate it fully to find out its affect. The variable I have chosen to investigate is the surface area of the maggot. I am going to observe how fast different size maggots can complete a set length, and then attempt to draw a conclusion by using precise measurements and observations.

The key variables I will have to observe for my investigation are of course the size of the maggots and their dimensions. Other variables will have to be kept constant however for it to be a fair and exact experiment, these include:

  • Temperature of the room
  • Dampness
  • Light
  • Length the maggots will crawl
  • Keeping the level of the platform stable

My prediction to the outcome of this experiment is an obvious one, the smaller the maggot is in dimensions, the greater its agility therefore the faster it will crawl. This kind of natural phenomenon is apparent especially in evolution of species.

...read more.

Middle

14

15

750

31

14

700

19

12

600

22

18

900

42

12

600

11

13

650

13

11

550

9

15

750

29

5

250

4

Preliminary Conclusion

From the result table above, I can draw the conclusion that In most cases, the greater the length of the maggot, the greater the amount of time it took for the maggot to complete the set distance. Ofcourse these experiments will have been affected by a lot of variables which we could not control, but seeing as these were only preliminary we did not attempt it. Also, I have not shown the speed of each maggot for my preliminary as this was just to test my method.

I will now improve on this experiment by introducing surface area, and conduct experiments to see how each of these factors effected the maggots overall performance.

I will also look at ways to improve my experimental method and list the apparatus we used in order to get our results as fair and precise as possible in our given conditions.

To see how the surface area affected the speed at which a maggot completes a set distance

In order to improve my method of experimentation, I will use a narrower track than before, this

...read more.

Conclusion

 One way which would vastly improve the accuracy of our experiment would be the use of video streaming equipment; with this we could record each maggot making its individual run. We could put these recordings onto a computer and use a program to slow down and very accurately record each run.

After we have these accurate results (accurate to within milli-seconds maybe) we could use Microsoft Excel to create a spreadsheet, which would tell us each maggots speed, surface area, volume and surface area to volume ratio.

A good way to improve my experiment without the aid of additional funding however would be to use surface area to volume ratio manually without the computer. This data would tell me a lot more about how each variable affects the maggots speed and would give good accurate results if plotted onto a graph.

A completely new approach to our experiment would be to use some sorts of movement sensors hooked up to computers, these sorts of high tech equipment would be able to give us a lot more freedom of choice.

 Also, control over a room with central heating would be an ideal way to keep the temperature exact, giving compensation for human body heat.

...read more.

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Forces and Motion section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

3 star(s)

*** An interesting report but there are some concerns over the validity of the results.
Planning. There needed to have been much more thought put in regarding the control of key variables. Maggots are very sensitive to light and temperature and there seems to be little mention on how these are to be controlled. There is no discussion as to why different sized maggots were timed over different distances and since this is a key variable it seems to make the experiment invalid.
Obtaining Evidence Results were recorded clearly but more care was needed in the headings of tables. There was no graph or discussion of results obtained.
Evaluation There are few practical suggestions for improving the method. There seems to be little point recording the time in milliseconds when other key variables are not being controlled.

Marked by teacher Stevie Fleming 03/01/2013

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Forces and Motion essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    The aim of this experiment was to compare the elasticity of arteries and vein ...

    4 star(s)

    Conclusions: As stated earlier on in this paper, due to the thicknesses of the artery and vein not being exactly the same, the results can only depict a trend, as opposed to an exact calculation, this aside, based on the graphs, it is quite clear to see that arteries have more elasticity than veins.

  2. Investigate and measure the speed of a ball rolling down a ramp.

    And when the G.P.E increases this means that when the object is moving downwards the kinetic energy also increases, because there would be more speed when rolling down. And that graph and results fully support my prediction number two, which states that when Gravitational potential energy increases the Kinetic energy also increases proportionally.

  1. Bouncing Ball Experiment

    The higher the air pressure the more air particles per cubic meter. The more particles per cubic meter, the more drag acting upon the ball. The material ball is made from will affect the ball as if it is smooth then the drag will be significantly less than if it is rough.

  2. The effect of the temperature on the viscosity of the syrup.

    Hence it will also affect the viscosity of the syrup. Temperature of the syrup - When the temperature is altered, the speed at which the molecule travels also changes. In effect the viscosity of the syrup also changes. Preliminary work To have an idea of the effect of different temperatures on syrup I will carry out preliminary work.

  1. INVESTIGATING HOW STEEPNESS AFFECTS SPEED

    There are many controlled variables to consider in this experiment such as the size and mass of ball, surface type (ball and ramp) force of the push and the distance rolled/ length of slope. Expected results Speed (cm per second)

  2. Investigation is to see how changing the height of a ramp affects the stopping ...

    It should have been the other way round because as I have predicted the greater the height of the ramp the greater the stopping distance and velocity and therefore as 9cm is greater than 8cm it should have a grater velocity and stopping distance when the ramp is 9cm high.

  1. To investigate how the angle of a slope affects the acceleration of a marble.

    Time taken for marble to roll down slope (sec) (?) 1 2 3 4 5 Average 30 3.00 1.01 1.03 0.96 1.06 0.93 1.00 40 5.06 0.75 0.79 0.77 0.74 0.79 0.77 70 8.92 0.59 0.61 0.56 0.56 0.56 0.58 I can now compare my set of results to the

  2. Rocket Essay. How Do Rockets Work?

    [Inventors] This diagram shows how Newton?s third law of motion (for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction) is applied on rockets. [NASA] Basic explanations of how rockets work have been given above, but how do Newton?s third law of motion applies on rockets?

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work