• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Investigating the Relationship Between Temperature and Viscosity.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Investigating the Relationship Between Temperature and Viscosity

Aim:

         To investigate how the temperature of honey affects the viscosity.

Diagram:

Prediction:

                    I predict that the ball bearing will take less time to fall through the honey when it is at a higher temperature.

Liquids have frictional forces between layers as they flow through pipes. The name viscosity is given to these forces. Flow rate is reliant on viscosity. A measurement of flow rate can be used as an indication to the liquids viscosity.

Viscous drag is proportional to the weight of the object being dropped. When up thrust and viscous drag = gravity, the ball bearing has reached its terminal velocity, e.g. parachute

In honey, as speed increases, so does drag. This acceleration is important as the duration of acceleration may differ in different viscosities. If acceleration were included in the times distance that the ball bearing feel through then this would affect my results because they would show how the ball bearings acceleration changed in different viscosities.

...read more.

Middle

ML/T² = L²/T

L²/T = ML/T²

       = (ML/T²)(T/L²)

       = M/TL

Unit ML ¹ T ¹

For formula use, length is measured  in metres, time in seconds and mass in kilograms, so the unit for viscosity is – kg m ¹ s ¹

image05.pngimage05.pngimage05.pngimage05.pngimage05.pngimage05.pngimage05.pngimage05.pngimage05.pngimage05.pngimage05.pngimage05.pngimage05.pngimage05.pngimage05.pngimage05.pngimage05.pngimage05.pngimage05.pngimage05.pngimage05.pngimage05.png

This diagram shows the content of particles within the honey. Each particle has a force and is moving about colliding with other particles. As thermal energy is supplied to increase the temperature, the energy is shared out between the particles increasing the kinetic energy on each particle. If a ball bearing was to be dropped in honey at a lower temperature then it would fall slower because of the slower moving particles not moving out of its way. If you drop the ball bearing into warmer honey it will fall faster because the particles will move out of the way faster.

Method:

  1. Set up equipment as in diagram, with water bath at room temperature.
  2. Fill up plastic tube with honey above the mark of timed distance to give the ball bearing a chance to accelerate.
...read more.

Conclusion

span="1">

Average Time

(seconds)

Exp1

Exp2

Exp3

20

4.88

5.01

4.92

4.94

25

4.36

4.75

4.64

4.58

30

4.09

4.08

4.07

4.08

35

3.68

3.42

3.51

3.54

40

2.08

2.25

2.11

2.15

Temperature

°C

Velocity (metres/second)

Average Velocity

Exp1

Exp2

Exp3

20

0.0143

0.0139

0.0142

0.0141

25

0.0160

0.0147

0.0150

0.0152

30

0.0171

0.0171

0.0172

0.0171

35

0.0190

0.0204

0.0199

0.0198

40

0.0336

0.0311

0.0331

0.0326

Temperature (log)

Average Velocity (log)

1.322219295

-1.848283338

1.397940009

-1.81551588

1.477121255

-1.765914475

1.544068044

-1.703096559

1.602059991

-1.486159768

Evaluation:

                   Percentage errors:

Venire Calibre (diameter of ball bearing)

0.005/3 x 100 = 0.166%

This percentage error is very small and so will not affect my results.

Ruler (distance travelled)

0.05/7 x 100 = 0.71429%

This is again very small so my results will still be quite accurate.

The whole experiment is reliant on Newtonian physics. This means that the ball bearing will have to fall through the honey in a straight line, any variation to this would cause inaccuracies in my results.

Conclusion:

                      My results show the viscosity of honey is proportional to temperature. A variable that could have affected my results was the density of the honey but the volume of honey only raised by 1mm showing that the density change was not enough to account for the change in viscosity.

...read more.

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Forces and Motion section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Forces and Motion essays

  1. The effect of the temperature on the viscosity of the syrup.

    Although this prevents the loss of syrup from the measuring cylinder, a small amount of syrup is still lost as the syrup becomes attached to the sphere whilst being removed. To improve this experiment further, the scale should be constantly monitored and further syrup should be added to maintain a constant level of syrup.

  2. Measuring the Viscosity of Honey

    using this piece of information, we can get to measure the viscosity of honey. Likely outcomes The perfect case (theoretically): as the object falls through the fluid, it keeps accelerating until it reaches a point of force balancing [ equilibrium ] .

  1. Practical investigation into Viscosity in liquids (Stokes Law).

    I used engine oil for this experiment, as this would prove to have the most change in viscosity when heated. The medium sized ball bearing was used to complete this experiment however all other variables remained the same. The results are shown below: Temperature Time taken (s)

  2. In this experiment I aim to find out how the force and mass affect ...

    There was one result that did not fit the pattern, and was too extreme to be our reaction time. This was the result for 0g on the manually timed weight experiment. It was suspiciously lower than the others were, and we agreed that it was the fact that the trolley hit the side wasting its energy on friction.

  1. Investigation into the effect of temperature on viscosity

    ?v = 2 r� ?steel g -2 r� ?fluid g and cancel common factors 9 ?v= 2 r� (? steel - ?fluid)g divide by 9v ?= 2 r� (? steel - ?fluid) g substitute v for s/t (v=s/t) 9v ? = 2 r2 (? steel - ?fluid) g 9 (s/t)

  2. Investigating the amazingness of theBouncing Ball!

    that the higher the temperature the higher the coefficient of restitution, and the lower the decay constant. Rubber and Silicone are made up of polymer chains, to make up the balls these chains are entwined within each other, and mainly held together by covalent bonds (Intermolecular forces).

  1. Prove that "Frictional Forces are Surface dependant".

    rubber band underneath it, one side of the rubber band at a distance of 10cms apart. 6. Then, using the rubber band that has been stuck to the surface, I will place the wooden block in between the rubber band, and pull the rubber band back (with the cube)

  2. This investigation is associated with the bounce of a squash ball. I will be ...

    * The duration of a collision is negligible compared with the time spent in free motion between collisions. * A molecule moves with uniform velocity between collisions this means gravity is not taken into account. * The collisions between molecules and between walls are perfectly elastic.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work